Fichier PDF

Partage, hébergement, conversion et archivage facile de documents au format PDF

Partager un fichier Mes fichiers Convertir un fichier Boite à outils PDF Recherche PDF Aide Contact



MALARIA GUIDE UK VERSION .pdf



Nom original: MALARIA GUIDE UK VERSION.pdf
Titre: Microsoft Word - GUIDE CONSEIL PALUDISME ENG.doc
Auteur: Aude GIRARD

Ce document au format PDF 1.3 a été généré par Microsoft Word / Mac OS X 10.5.8 Quartz PDFContext, et a été envoyé sur fichier-pdf.fr le 28/03/2011 à 10:05, depuis l'adresse IP 85.170.x.x. La présente page de téléchargement du fichier a été vue 1278 fois.
Taille du document: 3.7 Mo (7 pages).
Confidentialité: fichier public




Télécharger le fichier (PDF)









Aperçu du document


Guide for Residents of Tropical Areas 
where Malaria is Prevalent 
 
And more precisely, in its most 
dangerous form :  
 
« PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM » 
Malaria. 
 
 
 

 

 

 

In Memory of Aymeric Girard 
Who died on May 10th, 2010 in Dakar 
From Plasmodium Falciparum Malaria. 
He was only 7 years old.  
 
 

Who is this guide aimed at ? 
 
 
This guide is aimed at anybody who has made the choice to travel for a few months, or 
years, to tropical or sub tropical areas. 
  
It  has  been  written  with  the  help  of  Doctor  Strady,  a  doctor  in  the  Infectious  and 
Tropical Diseases Department of the Reims Hospital in France. I would like to thank him 
for his availability and his humanity. 
  
Let’s  stop  burying  our  heads  in  the  sand !  Every  year,  350  ‐  500  million  people  are 
infected and more than 1 million die from malaria. In France alone, there are between 
6500 and 7000 cases of imported malaria. Some cases are fatal. 
 
Malaria is an illness caught through the transmission of a parasite by a mosquito. Only 
the female mosquito bites as she needs certain elements contained in blood to produce 
eggs. She only bites between sunset and daybreak. 
  
Before leaving on your trip, like many travellers, you will go and see your doctor, nurse 
or pharmacist or go to a travel clinic to check if there is malaria in the country you are 
travelling to. You will have the necessary vaccinations and you will be given advice 
regarding any health risks.  
 
With malaria, there is no vaccine. You may be given advice on how to prevent malaria. 
You may be advised not to take anti‐malarial tablets for a long length of time due to the 
side  effects  of  these  drugs.  Some  doctors  may  advise  you  to  take  the  drugs  for  a  few 
months  but  then  to  stop.  Others  may  suggest  you  take  the  drugs  during  and  after  the 
rainy season. Others may even advise you take nothing. Among all this conflicting advice, 
you need to make a decision for the well being of your family.  
 
There is official advice through the National Travel Health Network 
http://www.nathnac.org/travel/factsheets/malaria.htm, 
the 
NHS 
http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/malaria/Pages/Introduction.aspx 
and 
the 
Health 
Protection 
Agency  
http://www.hpa.org.uk/web/HPAwebFile/HPAweb_C/1279888824011 
The  French  Health  Ministry  recently  published  the  following  advice  for  long  stays  in 
malaria‐infected areas.  
 
 
«To prevent malaria it is necessary to arm patients with in­depth information 
and in written format. We must insist on protection from mosquito bites (mosquito 
nets,  insect  repellent,  etc…).From  the  1st  trip,  a  course  of  Chemoprophylaxis 
(malaria tablets) adapted to the level of resistance, should be followed for at least 
the  first  6  months.  Past  6  months,  and  knowing  that  taking  anti­malarials  for 
several  years  is  unrealistic,  the  chemoprophylaxis  course  can  be  adapted  by  local 
doctors. Intermittent courses of the anti­malarials should be considered during the 
rainy season or when visiting rural areas. It is indispensable that if a fever should 
manifest  itself,  the  patient  should  see  a  doctor  straightaway.  Patients  should  be 
aware that the risks of malaria persist even on their return to an uninfected area, 
particularly during the first two months. » 

 



 
The  prophylaxis  is  not  a  guarantee  against  infection,  but  it  increases  the  body’s 
resistance to malaria and in some ways prepares the body to fight against the disease.  
 
If  you  go  to  risky  areas  with  a  baby  or  small  child,  closely  follow  the  prescription  for 
anti‐malarial syrup that your paediatrician will prescribe. 
 
Anybody can get infected. Nobody is safe. 
 
After a while we start to fall into bad habits, we forget to protect ourselves and this is 
when the risk is at its highest. 
  
Contrary to other guides covering the same subject, this one is going to start the other 
way around. 
 
Most existing guides start by giving advice as to preventative measures. These measures 
are  necessary  but  you  must  remember  that  these  are  not  100%  effective.  Certain 
prospectuses provide a description of the most frequent symptoms. You will sometimes 
find information on « Plasmodium Falciparum » which is the most dangerous and deadly 
form  of  malaria.  Whatever  the  symptoms,  as  soon  as  there  is  even  the  slightest 
temperature, you must consider malaria. 
  
But  before  talking  about  preventative  measures  or  disease  symptoms,  this  guide  will 
start  by  providing  advice  to  families  returning  to  Europe  on  holiday,  with  or  without 
children;  and  to  grandparents  or  other  relatives  who  look  after  children  visiting  from 
infected regions.  
 
This guide will then provide advice for friends and relatives who may decide to come to 
visit  you  in  infected  regions,  before  addressing  preventative  measures  and  common 
symptoms of malaria.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 



ADVICE TO RESIDENTS 
 
 
1. Returning to Europe on holiday 
 
The  year  has  been  great.  You  have  made  the  most  of  the  wonderful  country  you  are 
currently living in. The children have settled into their new schools and are happy. The 
school holidays arrive and you decide to return to Europe for a few weeks. In some cases 
you  may  decide  to  return  to  Europe  for  the  summer  or  you  may  decide  to  send  the 
children back to Europe to go to a summer camp or stay with their grandparents.  
 
You no longer think of malaria as you have left the infected region. You are wrong! 
 
The  first  symptoms  of  malaria  appear  between  7  days  and  2  months  (for  the  most 
deadly form) after the insect bite. The people in charge of your children (or you) will call 
a doctor if the children get a fever, sweat or have muscular pain. They/You may forget to 
mention that your children live abroad. The doctor may diagnose flu, a stomach ache or 
constipation. In the case of malaria, each day counts. 
 
Noone is safe ! 
 
Which is why, at the SLIGHTEST FEVER (even a very light one), you (grandparents, 
relatives,  the  childminder  or  even  your  children)  MUST  ABSOLUTELY  CONSIDER 
THAT  IT  COULD  BE  MALARIA  BEFORE  CONSIDERING  ANY  OTHER  DIAGNOSIS.  If 
possible,  go  directly  to  the  Accident  and  Emergency  Department  of  the  nearest 
hospital  and  ask  for  a  blood  test,  peripheral  smear  study  and/or  a  Quantitative 
Buffy Coat (QBC) (learn these names off by heart if necessary).  
 
We often hear about these tests without knowing what they are. Here are some simple 
explanations:  
 
‐ The Peripheral Smear Test : 
Light microscopy of thick and thin stained blood smears remains the standard 
method for diagnosing malaria. It involves collection of a blood smear, its staining 
with Romanowsky stains and examination of the Red Blood Cells for intracellular 
malarial parasites. Thick smears are 20–40 times more sensitive than thin smears 
for screening of Plasmodium parasites.  
In falciparum malaria, parasites may be hidden in tissue capillaries resulting in a 
falsely low parasite count in the peripheral blood. In such instances, the 
developmental stages of the parasite seen on blood smear may help to assess 
disease severity better than parasite count alone. One negative blood smear 
makes the diagnosis of malaria very unlikely (especially the severe form); 
however, smears should be repeated every 6–12 hours for 48 hours if malaria is 
still suspected. 

 



The smear can be prepared from blood collected by venipuncture, finger prick 
and ear lobe stab. In obstetric practice, cord blood and placental impression 
smears can be used.  


 
QBC : 
 
This is a new test that is very simple to use and can be bought in pharmacies. 
The  test  contains  all  of  its  staining  agents  within  a  single  tube.    Blood  is 
collected  by  a  finger  prick  and  then  centrifuged  in  the  QBC  centrifuge  for  5 
minutes. Since the tube has been concentrated by centrifugation, the malaria 
parasites  will  be  concentrated  and  it  can  be  quite  simple  and  fast  to  get  a 
result. 

 
 
 
If  you  are  going  to  an  isolated  area,  you  should  take  a  box  of  « COARTEM »  or 
« RIAMET »  or  « LARIAM »  or  « MALARONE »  in  your  suitcase,  and  follow  the 
instructions  as  soon  as  even  a  small  fever  is  detected,  just  in  case.  Go  to  your  doctor 
before you leave. He will prescribe the anti‐malarial. But don’t think you needn’t go to 
your nearest emergency medical centre. You must get a test to have a quick and reliable 
diagnosis.  
 
 
2. When your family come to visit 
 
We  tend  to  be  careful  to  begin  with  and  then  lapse.  Anti‐malarials  are  expensive. 
Nothing has happened to you so you say to your visitors that there is no need to worry 
and you will be careful when they get there. 
  
Again, you are wrong ! 
 
Your family/friends are only coming for a few days/weeks so it is essential they take the 
anti‐malarials prescribed by their doctor. The prescription must be followed to the letter 
and the anti‐malarials must be taken before, during and for several weeks after the trip 
(depending  on  the  drug).  There  are  certain  exceptions  for  people  taking  other 
medication or with certain medical conditions, but only doctors are in a position to make 
these decisions. 
Your friends and relatives should NOT stop the medication when they return home just 
because they think they have not been bitten! 
You hear sometimes that people do not want to take the anti‐malarial drugs because it 
makes them feel ill. Try to take the pill at a regular time, ideally in the morning, with a 
dairy product and with food. This helps a lot. 
 
You MUST INSIST that your friends/relatives take anti malarial drugs. You will feel very 
guilty for the rest of your life if anything happened. Remember that. 
There  is  no  exception  for  friends/relatives  already  living  in  another  country  where 
malaria is present. The fact that they are coming to another country with malaria makes 
them  more  vulnerable.  It  is  best  to  advise  them  to  take  a  course  of  anti‐malarials, 
particularly children.  

 



PREVENTION 
 
 
You have just arrived in your new home country. The removals van is in front of your 
new house and you are moving in. Perhaps you are currently staying in a hotel or other 
temporary accommodation while you wait for your new house to be ready/available. 
  
One  of  the  first  things  to  do  is  to  buy  mosquito  nets  impregnated  with  insecticide  for 
each member of the family. If you are not sure you will find them in the country you are 
going  to,  buy  some  on  the  Internet  (there  are  several  sites)  or  from  your  pharmacist 
before leaving. 
  
Every  evening  check  that  there  are  no  holes  in  the  mosquito  net,  particularly  at  the 
edges and tuck it into the bed to make sure there are no possible entry points. Always 
cover your baby’s cot before going to bed.  
 
Do  not  think  that  mosquito  nets  are  unnecessary.  Sleeping  in  an  air‐conditioned  room 
does not mean that you are protected. Mosquitoes don’t like air‐conditioning but it does 
not kill them or prevent them coming in to the room. 
  
You  can  also  use  anti‐mosquito  plugs  in  bedrooms.  You  plug  them  in  but  if  there  is  a 
power  cut  and  you  don’t  have  a  back‐up  generator,  there  is  a  risk  that  you  become 
unprotected. 
 
When  you  go  out  in  the  evening,  make  sure  you  wear  long  sleeves  and  long  trousers. 
Always keep anti‐mosquito spray on you at all times as you never know when or for how 
long you will be outside. If possible re‐apply anti‐mosquito spray every 4 hours. Before 
going to bed, have a shower to remove the cream. Never use an adult spray on a child 
and  vice‐versa.  The  doses  are  different.  Protect  babies  and  children.  Some  parents, 
rather than put chemicals onto their babies skin, prefer to mix ordinary body lotion with 
lemon eucalyptus oil (found in most pharmacies). It smells good and is less of an irritant 
than most of the anti‐mosquito lotions available on the market. 
 
If you are going to dine outside, think to light anti‐mosquito candles. You can leave them 
under the table. They diffuse an odour that mosquitoes hate.  
 
 
 
 
EVEN  IF  THEY  ARE  NOT  100%  EFFECTIVE,  IT  IS  ESSENTIAL  TO  FOLLOW 
RECOMMENDATIONS TO ENSURE MAXIMAL PROTECTION. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 



SYMPTOMS 
 
 
Malaria is vicious as the symptoms are not always the same or obvious. 
 
Certain  symptoms  must  be  taken  very  seriously  and  you  should  consult  a  doctor 
immediately: 
 
‐ Headache 
‐ Fever 
‐ Sweating 
‐ Shivering 
‐ Muscle pains 
 
Some of these symptoms could be mistaken for flu.  
 
But  be  careful,  as  the  most  serious  form  of  malaria,  « Plasmodium  Falciparum »,  is 
difficult  to  detect  as  the  symptoms  are  not  always  very  noticeable,  especially  in 
children ! 
 
The fever can be low 
There may be a stomach ache with diarrhea and/or constipation. 
Respiratory problems 
 
ONLY  ONE  THING  TO  REMEMBER :  AS  SOON  AS  A  FEVER  MANIFESTS  ITSELF, 
HOWEVER  SMALL,THE  RISK  OF  MALARIA  MUST  BE  CONSIDERED  BEFORE  ANY 
OTHER DIAGNOSIS 
 
You  must  ask  for  a  malaria  diagnostic  test  (smear  and/or  QBC)  even  if  they  are 
considering a different diagnosis. Listen to your instincts ! 
 
Malaria  can  become  fatal  within  only  a  few  days.  In  the  case  of  « Plasmodium 
Falciparum », the parasite transmitted by the mosquito into the person’s blood, travels 
to the liver and then into the red blood cells where they grow and multiply and infect the 
whole body. It can attack the brain (cerebral malaria), the lungs or the digestive tract. 
 
 
 
 
My name is Aude Girard. My beloved son, Aymeric, died at the age of 7yrs old 
on May 10th, 2010 in Dakar from Plasmodium Falciparum malaria. He had a 
stomach ache and a very low fever. The doctor had diagnosed a gastric problem and 
did not ask for the malaria test. He died a few days later ...  
there was nothing we could do.  
 
We never want this to happen again...to anybody 
audegirard@yahoo.fr 

 




Documents similaires


malaria guide uk version
7567
how to lose belly fat at home
acute cerebellitis eleven year retrospective study
biotoxin protocol pdf2082363964 2
discitis1


Sur le même sujet..