Fichier PDF

Partage, hébergement, conversion et archivage facile de documents au format PDF

Partager un fichier Mes fichiers Boite à outils PDF Recherche Aide Contact



SLA mechanism Cell death .pdf



Nom original: SLA_mechanism_Cell_death.pdf

Ce document au format PDF 1.3 a été généré par Apple Keynote 5.1.1 / Mac OS X 10.6.8 Quartz PDFContext, et a été envoyé sur fichier-pdf.fr le 05/12/2011 à 12:50, depuis l'adresse IP 109.12.x.x. La présente page de téléchargement du fichier a été vue 876 fois.
Taille du document: 2.3 Mo (49 pages).
Confidentialité: fichier public




Télécharger le fichier (PDF)









Aperçu du document


Mechanisms of
Motoneuron death
in Amyotrophic Lateral
Sclerosis
G Le Masson, MD, PhD
INSERM - Neurocentre Magendie
Motor System Disease

lundi 5 décembre 2011

ALS - Summary
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
lundi 5 décembre 2011

Definitions
Etiology  and  diagnosis
Superoxide dismutase
Affected  motoneurons
Motoneuron  degeneration:  Mechanisms
Motoneuron  vulnerability  and  axon  die-­back
Compensatory  sprouting
ALS  – time  course  of  disease  

1.1. Motor Unit: a lower motoneuron and
all the muscle fibers that it innervates

‡

http://www.agen.ufl.edu/~chyn/age2062/lect/lect_19/180.gif

lundi 5 décembre 2011

1.2. Motor unit types

S  units
lundi 5 décembre 2011

FR  units

FF  units

1.3. The disease of Amyotrophic
Lateral Sclerosis

‡ An  adult-­onset,  neurodegenerative  disease  that  
preferentially  affects  the  upper  and  lower  
motoneurons

‡ Progressive  muscle  weakness,  atrophy  and  
spasticity
‡ Death  within  3-­5  years  of  diagnosis
‡ No  effective  treatments  available
‡ Now  beginning  to  understand  the  disease  
processes  underlying  preferential  motoneuron  
death

lundi 5 décembre 2011

2.1.1. Amyotrophic Lateral
Sclerosis: Etiology

‡ Global  incidence:  2/100,000  (ALSA  
website)
‡ High  incidence  (same  as  MS)
‡ but low  prevalence  

‡ Age  of  onset:  ~55  yrs  of  age
lundi 5 décembre 2011

2.1.2. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis:
Etiology

‡ Known risk factors
‡
 Gender  1.5:1  male  to  female  
‡
Family  history        
‡
Age

-­  20%  of  ALS  cases  are  familial

lundi 5 décembre 2011

2.1.3. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis:
Etiology

‡ Possible risk factors:
‡ Athleticism
‡ Exposure to  heavy  

metals/herbicides/chemicals

‡ Smoking
‡ Trauma
lundi 5 décembre 2011

2.2.1. ALS: Diagnosis

‡ Initial  presenting  symptom  dependent  on  
whether  bulbar  or  spinal  form  of  disease  

‡ Spinal  form  is  more  common  (75%),  and  
presents  as  weakness  in  one  distal  limb

‡ Upper  AND  lower  motoneuron  signs  must  
be  present  for  diagnosis

‡ Present  in  3  of  4  body  segments  

Must  include  one  of  cervical,  thoracic,  lumbar  
or  sacral

lundi 5 décembre 2011

2.2.2. Diagnostic clinical signs of ALS

From  Strong  &  Rosenfeld,  2003  

lundi 5 décembre 2011

3.1. Superoxide dismutase in fALS

‡ ~10-­20%  of  fALS cases  (~1-­2%  of  all  ALS  cases)  are  
associated  with  autosomal dominant  mutations  to  the  
superoxide dismutase (SOD1)  gene  that  transcribes  
sarcoplasmic Cu/Zn  SOD1  

– the  most  common  mutation  is  A4V
‡ The  discovery  of  a  genetic  mutation  has  led  to  the  

development  of  mouse  model(s)  of  familial  ALS  (Gurney,  
1994)
– G93A  SOD1  mouse  lives  for  130  days  of  age,  signs  of  
symptoms  at  90  days  of  age  coincident  with  loss  of  
motoneurons  from  the  lumbar  spinal  cord

lundi 5 décembre 2011

3.2. SOD1: The oxygen paradox
‡ Neurons  are  highly  oxidative
‡ Aerobic metabolism  – generates  more  ATP
‡ Oxygen reduction  –addition  of  4  electrons  in  
‡

mitochondria
2%  of  oxygen  generates  free  radicals  that  are  not
reduced
Cytochrome oxidase complex                                

O2

e  -­

O2

e  -­
2  H+
SOD

lundi 5 décembre 2011

H2O2      

e  -­

OH

OH

e  -­
H+

H2O

Glutathione  peroxidase

‡
‡

3. mSOD1 – gain of cytotoxic function
Pathology: Mutations to SOD1
yet  to  be  determined  gain  of  cytotoxic function
At  first,  thought  to  be  associated  with  aberrant  SOD1  
chemistry,  resulting  in  



reduced  enzyme  function  of  buffering  free  radicals  or  

OR Abnormal  enzyme  function  generating  more  free  radicals  and  
hence  oxidative  stress

‡
‡

BUT  toxicity  NOT associated  with  level  of  SOD1  enzyme  
activity  
AND  increased  markers  of  oxidative  stress  are  NOT
found  in  all  SOD1  mediated  human  disease  and  
transgenic  mSOD1  mice.    

lundi 5 décembre 2011

4. Affected motoneurons in ALS

‡ Upper  and  lower  motoneurons
‡ Only 2  groups  of  motoneurons  are  not  affected  in  ALS
Onuf’s nucleus  and  the  oculomotor  nucleus

These motoneurons  have  Calcium buffering  proteins,calbindin and  
parvalbumin

‡ Calcium  is  neurotoxic in  excess
can  initiate  a  cascade  of  cell  death  by  activating  caspases
can overwhelm  calcium  buffering  systems,  causing  energy  deficits  
1st clue  into  ALS  disease  progression  – Ca  influx may play  a  role  in  
triggering  motoneuron  death
lundi 5 décembre 2011

5. Events leading to motoneuron death in ALS

1.Protein  
Aggregation

4.Glutaminergic 5.Oxidative
2.Cytoskeletal
Excitotoxicity
Stress
Derangement
3.Inflammation

Neurodegeneration and  death

lundi 5 décembre 2011

5.1.1. Events leading to motoneuron death in
ALS

4.Glutaminergic
5.Oxidative
2.Cytoskeletal
1.Protein
Excitotoxicity
Stress
Derangement
Aggregation
3.Inflammation

Neurodegeneration and  death

lundi 5 décembre 2011

5.1.2. Protein aggregation

‡folding  of  
Aberrant  

mSOD1  
proteins  –
monomers  
and  dimers

‡self-­aggregates  and  may  
Abnormal  SOD1  protein  

ƔAberrant  oxidative  

chemistry  from  wrong  
substrate
From  Cleveland  &  Rothstein,  2001

lundi 5 décembre 2011

aggregate  with  other  
proteins

‡co-­aggregation
Loss  of  function  through  

5.1.3. Protein aggregation
‡folding  of  
Aberrant  

mSOD1  
proteins –
monomers  and  
dimers

ƔAberrant  

oxidative  
chemistry  
from  wrong  
substrate
From Cleveland & Rothstein, 2001

lundi 5 décembre 2011

‡function  of  
Loss  of   ƔChaperone  activity  
ƔProteosome
reduced  as  they  
aggregated  
proteins
attempt  to  mediate  

normal  folding  and/or  
assembly-­>choking

activity  reduced  
due  to  ‘choking’  
with  ubiquinated
protein  aggregates

5.1.4. Normal motoneurons and
surrounding astrocytes (normal SOD1)
SOMA  and  DENDRITES
‡ glutamatergic synapses  
‡ NMDA  and  AMPA  receptors
‡ Functioning  intracellular  chaperone  and  
proteosomes
‡*Ou transporters  (also  on  astrocytes)

A.  Normal  

AXON
‡ Axonal  transport
‡ Acetylcholine  release  at  the  neuromuscular  
junction

lundi 5 décembre 2011

5.2. ’SICK’ motoneurons and surrounding
astrocytes (mutant SOD1)
1.  mSOD1  
aggregates
‡ saturate  (‘choke’)  
the  chaperones  and  
proteosomes
affecting  both  cells
‡ Inhibit  transport

A.  Normal  

From  Cleveland  &  Rothstein,  2001

lundi 5 décembre 2011

‡ 2.  Neurofilament
disorganization  
‡ Associated  with  
hyperphosphorylation
due  to  5.  oxidative  
stress

5.3. Events leading to motoneurons
death in ALS
1.  Protein  
Aggregation

3.  Inflammation
2.  Cytoskeletal
Derangement

Glutaminergic Oxidative
Excitotoxicity
Stress

Neurodegeneration

lundi 5 décembre 2011

5.3.1. Microglial inflammatory
response
‡ Reactive  microglia
‡ accumulate  in  regions  of  
motoneurons
‡ Released  factors  
‡ inflammatory
‡ glutamate
‡ free  radicals
‡ Cytokines  activate  
astrocytes
‡ release  glutamate
CYTOKINES  AND  EXCESS  
GLUTAMATE
Adapted  from  Strong,  2004

lundi 5 décembre 2011

5.4. Events leading to motoneurons
death in ALS
1.  Protein  
Aggregation

3.  Inflammation
Oxidative
4.  Glutaminergic Stress
2.  Cytoskeletal
Excitotoxicity
Derangement

Neurodegeneration

lundi 5 décembre 2011

5.4. Glutaminergic Excitotoxicity
Excitotoxicity: “A  phenomenon  
whereby  the  excitatory  action  of  
glutamate  and  related  excitatory  
amino  acids  becomes  transformed  
into  a  neuropathological process  
that  can  rapidly  kill  CNS  neurons.”  
lundi 5 décembre 2011

5.4.2. Glutaminergic Excitotoxicity:
Ca leaky AMPA receptors
Metabo

Presynaptic
NMDA

AMPA

Astrocyte
lundi 5 décembre 2011

Neuron

5.4.2. Glutaminergic Excitotoxicity: Ca
leaky unedited AMPA (GluR2) receptors
Normal

‡ Post-­transcriptional  modification  

of  mRNA  for  one  aa:  from  glutamine  
to  arginine (Q  to  R)  in  the  GluR2  
subunit  

‡ Normal  GluR2R subunit  –

relatively  low  Ca  permeability

ALS

‡

Abnormal  unedited  GluR2Q  
isoform -­highly  permeable  to  Ca
From  Kwak &  Kawahara,  2005

lundi 5 décembre 2011

5.4.3. Glutaminergic Excitotoxicity:
Loss of GLU transporters (EEATs)

Metabo

Presynaptic
EEATs

Glu
GluR2Q

EEATs

Astrocyte

lundi 5 décembre 2011

Neuron

NMDA

++
Ca

5.4.4. Glutaminergic Excitotoxicity: High
glutamate, Ca accumulation
No  Ca  binding  
proteins:  calbindin
and  calmodulin
Presynaptic

Metabo

Glu
GluR2Q
EEATs

Astrocyte

lundi 5 décembre 2011

Neuron

EEATs NMDA

High
intrac Ca++

5.4.5. Glutaminergic Excitotoxicity: High
glutamate, Ca accumulation and neuronal
damage
No  Ca  binding  
proteins:  calbindin
and  calmodulin
Presynaptic
EEATs

Metabo

Neuron

NMDA

Glu

Mitochondria

++
Ca

AMPA
EEATs

Astrocyte
lundi 5 décembre 2011

Nucleus

Membrane

5.4,5. Events leading to
motoneurons death in ALS
1.  Protein  
Aggregation

3.  Inflammation
4.  Glutaminergic
2.  Cytoskeletal
Excitotoxicity
Derangement
5.  Oxidative  
Stress

Neurodegeneration

lundi 5 décembre 2011

5.4,5.Oxidative stress and neuronal
damage
No  Ca  binding  
proteins:  calbindin
and  calmodulin
Presynaptic

Metabo

Neuron

NMDA
EEATs
Mitochondria

Glu

++
Ca

Reactive  oxygen  
species  including  
free  radicals  such  
as  ONOO

AMPA
EEATs

Astrocyte

lundi 5 décembre 2011

Nucleus
Membrane

5. Events leading to motoneurons
death in ALS
1.  Protein  
Aggregation

3.  Inflammation
4.  Glutaminergic
2.  Cytoskeletal
Excitotoxicity
Derangement
5.  Oxidative  
Stress

Neurodegeneration
lundi 5 décembre 2011

Summary: multiple and convergent pathways

3.Inflammation
1.Aggregates
4.Glu Toxicity

lundi 5 décembre 2011

4.Stress
Oxydatif

6. Motoneuron vunerability and
axon die-back

‡ Motoneurons  are  large,  highly  metabolic  with  long  
processes  

‡ The  motoneurons  that  are  selectively  vulnerable  do  
not  have  calcium  buffering  proteins  

‡ Hypothesis:  Their  large  size  and  consequent  high  

metabolic  load  and  associated  oxidative  enzymes  
predisposes  motoneurons  to  be  vulnerable  in  
ALS.  

‡ Remember!  There  size  is  one  of  the  characteristics  
that  differentiates  the  motor  units.

lundi 5 décembre 2011

6.1. Counting surviving motoneurons in the
lumbar ventral horn

‡
lundi 5 décembre 2011

Nissl staining

6.2. Motoneuron vunerability and
axon die-back: Research question

‡Is there evidence of disease prior to the
significant loss of motoneurons reported
after 80 days?
(G93A transgenic ALS mouse – 4m
lifespan)

‡

‡Specifically, is there loss of functional
motor units?

lundi 5 décembre 2011

6.3. ALS – course of the disease?

When are functional
motor units lost?
Preferential loss of
some motoneurons and
not others?
Axons of intact motor
units SPROUT and
reinnervate
denervated muscle
fibers?

lundi 5 décembre 2011

6.3.1. Measuring loss of functional
motoneurons and compensatory
sprouting

‡G93A  mSOD1  transgenic  mouse    model  of  ALS
lundi 5 décembre 2011

6.3.2. Selective muscle type vulnerability:

Whole  muscle  tetanic  force  (mN)

Fast EDL but not slow SOL already affected
at 80d in ALS mouse
350
300
250
200
150
100

Fast  EDL
2Gur
ALS
1Gur
Normal
1Gur
2Gur

350
300

Slow  Soleus
ALS

250
200
150

Normal

100

50

50

0

0

Whole  muscle  tetanic  force  (mN)

0

350

200  ms

300
250
200
150
100
50
0

2Gur

1Gur

EDL
lundi 5 décembre 2011

2Gur

1Gur

Soleus

6.3.3. Selective motoneuron vulnerability:
Motor units lost in fast EDL but not
slow SOL at 80d in ALS mouse
MOTOR  UNITS

350

Normal
ALS

50

300
250

Motor  unit  number

Whole  muscle  tetanic  force  (mN)

MUSCLE  FORCE

200
150
100
50
0

2Gur

1Gur

EDL

lundi 5 décembre 2011

2Gur

1Gur

Sol

40

30

20

10

0

2Gur

1Gur

EDL

2Gur

1Gur

Sol

6.3.4. Very early loss of
functional motor units in fast but
not slow muscles
MOTOR UNITS
100

100

Gur1  motor  units    (%)  
(%  of  2Gur)

Gur1  muscle  tetanic  force  (%)
(%  of  2Gur)

MUSCLE FORCES

80

60
40

20
0

40d

80d

EDL

lundi 5 décembre 2011

40d

80d

Sol

80

60

40

20

0

40d

80d

EDL

40d

80d

Sol

6.3.5. Motor unit loss reflects a rapid loss
and die-back of the largest motoneurons
during asymptomatic ALS disease
Asymptomatic

Symptomatic

Motor  units  remaining  (%)  

100

Paralysis

80

SLOW  

60

FAST

40

20

0
0
WT

20

40

60

80

100

120

Very  early,  presymptomatic
Age  (days) loss  of  motor  units
lundi 5 décembre 2011

6.3.6. ALS – course of the disease

Functional motor units
lost during
asymptomatic disease
Preferential loss of
fast motor units
Only axons of intact
slow motor units
SPROUT and
reinnervate
denervated muscle
fibers

lundi 5 décembre 2011

7. Does compensatory axonal
sprouting of surviving motor
units occur?
Is there any effective axonal
sprouting that compensates for
loss of motoneuron ie. do
surviving motoneurons sprout to
enlarge their motor units with
more muscle fibers than normal?
lundi 5 décembre 2011

7.1. Poor sprouting capacity of ALS motor
nerves fails to innervate denervated muscle
fibers
EDL
40

Motor  unit  number

40d  2Gur  (mean  +  se)

30

20

10

73%

64%
32%

0

40d

60d

90d

Age

~70%  denervated endplates  and  few    (~5%)  sprouts

lundi 5 décembre 2011

Degenerating  IM  sheath

7.2. Limited sprouting capacity of motor
nerves in ALS
40  days

90  days

50  days

90  days

Innervated  end-­plate
Denervated end-­plate

lundi 5 décembre 2011

Nodal  sprout
Ultraterminal sprout

Degenerating  IM  sheath

7.3. Very little axonal sprouting
to compensate for loss of motor
units
At all ages, irrespective of the extent of
muscle fiber denervation, there is evidence of
sprouting only at ~5% of endplates in all the
muscles, these being the endplates on the slow
muscle fibers only.
As a result, the rapid withdrawal of the
terminals of large fast motoneurons leads to
rapid denervation of the fast muscle fibers

lundi 5 décembre 2011

8.1. ALS disease - Time course
‡ Early  die-­back of  motor  axons  from  fast-­twitch  
muscle  fibers
‡ Cytoskeletal derangement – concomitant  with  
axon  die-­back?
‡ Inflammatory  activation of  microglia and  
astrocytes
‡ Cellular  aggregation of  mSOD1,  saturation  of  
chaperones  and  choked  proteosomes
‡ Cellular  aggregates  inhibit  axonal  transport  with  
associated axon  die-­back

lundi 5 décembre 2011

8.2. ALS disease - Time course
continued
‡ Glu excitatoxicity with  loss  of  Glu transporters,  
glutamate  accumulation
‡ Elevated  intracellular  Ca,  mitochondrial  dysfunction  
and oxidative  stress – largest  fast  motoneurons  the  
most  susceptible
‡ Caspase activation and  progressive  death  of  
motoneurons
‡ Paralysis  and  death

lundi 5 décembre 2011


Documents similaires


Fichier PDF sla mechanism cell death
Fichier PDF sclerose laterale amyotrophique rdp 2016 5 555
Fichier PDF 51 s2 0 s0246037815458002
Fichier PDF systeme moteur 1
Fichier PDF recapitulatif motricite2011
Fichier PDF kevin richardson pure natural healing ebook


Sur le même sujet..