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Table 2-1
IARU Band Plan
Region 1
1810 to 1838: CW
1838 to 1840: Digimode
Packet, CW
1840 to 1842: Digimode except
Packet, Phone, CW
1842 to 2000: Phone, CW

Region 2
1800 to 1830: CW, Digimode
1830 to 1840: CW, Digimode
(DX CW window)
1840 to 1850: (DX Phone window), CW
1850 to 2000: Phone, CW

Region 3
1800 to 1830: CW
1830 to 1834: RTTY, CW, DX
1834 to 1840: CW
1840 to 2000: Phone, CW

3500 to 3510: Intercontinental DX
CW
3500 to 3560: CW, Contest preferred
CW segment
3560 to 3580: CW
3580 to 3590: Digimode, CW
3590 to 3600: Digimode, Packet
Preferred, CW
3600 to 3620: Phone, Digimode, CW
3600 to 3650: Phone Contest
preferred phone segment, CW
3650 to 3775: Phone, CW
3700 to 3800: Phone Contest preferred
phone segment, CW
3730 to 3740: SSTV, FAX, Phone,
CW
3775 to 3800: Intercontinental DX
Phone

3500 to 3510: (DX CW window)
3510 to 3525: CW
3525 to 3580: CW, (Phone permitted,
non-interference basis)
3580 to 3620: Digimode, (Phone permitted,
non-interference basis), CW
3620 to 3635: Packet Priority, (Phone
permitted, non-interference basis), CW
3635 to 3775: Phone, CW
3775 to 3800: Phone (DX Phone window),
CW
3800 to 3840: Phone, CW
3840 to 3850: SSTV, FAX, Phone, CW
3850 to 4000: Phone, CW

3500
3510
3535
3775
3800

7000 to 7035: CW
7035 to 7040: Digimode (except
Packet), SSTV/FAX,CW
7040 to 7045: Digimode (except
Packet, SSTV/FAX), Phone, CW
7045 to 7100: Phone, CW

7000 to 7035: CW
7035 to 7040: Digimode with
other Regions, CW
7040 to 7050: Packet with other Regions,
CW
7050 to 7100: Phone, CW
7100 to 7120: Digimode, Phone, CW
7120 to 7165: Phone, CW
7165 to 7175: SSTV, FAX, Phone, CW
7175 to 7300: Phone, CW

7000 to 7025: CW
7025 to 7030: NB, CW
7030 to 7040: NB/Phone, CW
7040 to 7100: Phone, CW
7100 to 7300: Phone, CW (See
footnote 5). This segment is allocated
on a secondary basis to amateur
service in Australia and
New Zealand

before a new exclusive area is created, and this should be
done through planning with existing operators (CW and
Phone)—rather than dictatorship—or the result will be a real
mess and many hard feelings will be created. Before isolat­
ing several kHz from a prime area, the rule makers should
make sure the operators already there (for many years) will
have a suitable place to move and will be found willing to do
so. As Tom, W8JI wrote on the Topband Reflector: “We need
a long-term plan that does not displace primary users. The
IARU needs to seek input for 160 operators before they mess
things up for everyone, and cause a lot of hard feelings that
last for many years.”
Let’s look at the ARRL-published 160-meter band
plan (Feb 2003). For some unknown reason, this is different
from the IARU Region 2 band plan (same publication date).
The ARRL band plan certainly makes more sense than
the IARU-published one when it comes to digital modes on
160 meters.
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Chapter 2

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3510: DX, CW
3535: CW
3775: Phone, CW
3800: DX Phone, CW
3900: Phone, CW

ARRL Band Plan 160 Meters
1800 to 1810
Digital Modes
1810
CW QRP
1800 to 2000
CW
1843 to 2000
SSB, SSTV and other wideband modes
1910
SSB QRP
1995 to 2000
Experimental
1999 to 2000
Beacons
There is a major problem area in the choice of the
frequencies for digital modes in the present (Feb 2003) IARU
band plan. This band plan, where digital modes are squeezed
in-between the CW and the Phone (+CW) section, is really
unacceptable. Once 160 meters is hot again at the bottom of
the solar cycle, this band plan is a guarantee for continuous
conflicts and battles. The only reasonable solution is to use
1800 to 1810 kHz in Region 2 and 1810 to 1815 kHz in Region
1 (so long as Region 1 does receive 1800 to 1810) for digital
modes. I suggest that all readers contact their national radio

2/8/2005, 9:43 AM