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| FRIDAY, MAY 16, 2014

INTERNATIONAL NEW YORK TIMES

page two
IN YOUR WORDS
Kidnappings in Nigeria

I’m always curious why we’re ready to
launch missiles when oil is involved, but
when true acts of terrorism occur, we sit
back and lament the state of the world. We
have military strike teams. Coordinated
with the Nigerian government, we should
exercise some of the ‘‘precision strike’’
capability we’re supposed to have learned
so well in this pitiful decade of war. . . . We
should be on the side of the righteous
when the line is this clear and bright.

The streets as a canvas

One union,
but various
agendas

SB

Alan
Cowell

It is a relief that these young girls made it to
freedom and to hear their testimonies. One
has to wonder where are the supervisors
and teachers of this school and what
happened to them on the night their
students were kidnapped. . . . Let this never
happen again.

LETTER FROM EUROPE
BERLIN The flight from London to Ber-

a 2012 interview with The Times. ‘‘It’s a
perfect story. It has the human element,
the music aspect, a resurrection and a
detective story.’’

lin takes less than 90 minutes but,
measured in less tangible ways on one
recent journey, the distance was much
greater, not least because it came on
the anniversary of Nazism’s defeat and
the beginning of Europe’s effort to seek
a new self-definition.
In Berlin, the traveler senses, the
gaze strays eastward, drawn by the
crisis over Russia’s intentions in
Ukraine that has once again illuminated
Germany’s fraught relationship with
the Kremlin, seen through the prism of
economic bonds and energy supplies.
In London, by contrast, the political
class peers inward, at the prospects
and prognostication for European Parliament elections this month that are
widely trumpeted as a watershed moment, strengthening the upstart, euroskeptic, anti-immigrant U.K. Independence Party’s claim
to
sway the political
The sense
agenda.
of Europe’s
But, if there is a
enfeeblement strand that binds
emboldens
these splintered viMr. Putin
sions, it is that both
show the European
and his allies.
project to be an uneasy coalition of national agendas — heating bills in Germany, political survival in Britain —
that cannot focus far beyond narrow interests.
That is especially evident these days,
when President Vladimir V. Putin’s maneuvers threaten to halt what had once
been seen as an inexorable Western
advance into post-Soviet domains from
the Baltic to the Balkans that would redraw Europe’s political frontiers.
‘‘The European Union, the greatest
political and economic power on this
continent, has yet to find a language to
deal with Putin’s behavior,’’ the columnist Bernd Ulrich wrote in the newspaper Die Zeit, published in Hamburg.
‘‘The campaign for the European Parliament is proceeding practically without any connection to the conflict that
will define the European Union far more
than any parliamentary election,’’ he
said, referring to the crisis in Ukraine.
While the 28-nation European Union
had prevented the unimaginable —
war between its members — ‘‘it stands
by helplessly when it is confronted
with the phenomenon of war outside its
borders,’’ he said.
But it is not simply about physical
frontiers. The gulf between Moscow
and Berlin or London is as much about
competing visions of social values and
the limits of tolerance as it is about territorial demarcation.
That was clear enough when a peculiarly European pageant — the Eurovision song contest — produced a
somewhat idiosyncratic winner in
Copenhagen last weekend in the
slender, sequined form of Conchita
Wurst, the stage name of Thomas
Neuwirth, known widely as the
bearded lady. ‘‘For me, my dream came
true,’’ said Mr. Neuwirth, a 25-year-old
drag performer from Austria. ‘‘But for
our society, it just showed me that there
are people out there who want to go into the future and go on, you know, not
stepping back or thinking in the past.’’
In contrast to the acclaims that
greeted the Austrian victory, Russia’s
entrants — the twins Anastasia and
Maria Tolmachevy — were booed during the semifinals, and Russian judges
speaking from Moscow were jeered by
the live audience at the final.
That reflected not only Western discomfort with the Kremlin’s actions in
Ukraine but also the wider question of
Russian attitudes to Western sexual and
social norms, depicted by some in Moscow as the heralds of social collapse, but
by Conchita Wurst and many others as
a hard-won victory for diversity.
‘‘What Putin sees as decadence,’’ Mr.
Ulrich said, ‘‘is Europe’s real strength.’’
It is that collision that is playing out,
in part, in developments in Ukraine,
driven by a much more hard-nosed instinct in Moscow to revive and expand
Russia’s imperium. Yet it is that sense
of Europe’s enfeeblement from within
that emboldens Mr. Putin and his allies
to resist the further encroachment of
values defined more in Brussels, Washington or Berlin than on the barricades
of Donetsk or Luhansk.
At the Eurovision song contest, the
British blogger Alex Stevenson said,
Ukraine garnered more votes for its
entry than Russia. But ‘‘in the real
world where realpolitik and guns take
the place of glitz and confetti,’’ he said,
the standoff ‘‘is far from over.’’

Ashley Southall contributed reporting.

EMAIL:

MISS LEY, NEW YORK

The whole U.N. organization should try to
make this nightmare come to an end.
Fanaticism is a global challenge, and it
requires global collaboration to eradicate it.
ANDRES HOLGADO, S PAIN

Anti-China riots in Vietnam

As a tributary country under old Chinese
dynasty for almost a thousand years,
Vietnam has inherently been seen as a lowlevel territory by many nationalist Chinese.
Vietnam can learn from South Korea, also
a past tributary, which has earned dignity
and status through impressive
development. Conflicts won’t solve any
problems.
YA NG, SEAT TLE

I applaud the Vietnamese for standing up
against China. Why don’t other
surrounding nations do the same when the
Chinese claim their shirts and pants? Next
time China will think twice and not act as
they can dictate whatever they want.
THOMAS K ASAR, DELHI

See what readers are talking about and
leave your own comments at inyt.com

IN OUR PAGES

International Herald Tribune

1939 Princesses Ride Third Class

LO N D O N Princess Elizabeth and Prin-

cess Margaret Rose gratified a royal ambition today [May 15] by riding in a London subway train for the first time,
something their grandmother, Queen
Mary, has never done in her 71 years.
Recognized only by two ticket collectors,
the Princesses rode in an ordinary thirdclass smoking-car, traveled up and down
escalators and in general had the fun of
their young lives at a total cost of four
cents each. Accompanied by Lady Helen
Graham and their governess, Miss
Crawford, the Princesses drove from
Buckingham Palace to Saint-James’s
park station. There began the novel and
exciting process of getting tuppenny
tickets from an automatic machine.

1964 McNamara Report Pessimistic
WAS H I N GTO N Anxiety about the anti-

Communist war in South Vietnam
deepened here today [May 15] as Defense Secretary Robert McNamara outlined recent developments there in a report described as ‘‘very discouraging,
very pessimistic.’’ Mr. McNamara, who
returned yesterday from his fifth trip to
South Vietnam since May, 1962, made his
report at an 80-minute closed-door
meeting with President Johnson, National Security Council members and 17
congressional leaders.
Find a retrospective of news from 1887 to
2013 at iht-retrospective.blogs.nytimes.com

PHOTOGRAPHS BY CHARLES PETIT

Charles Petit began exploring
the streets of Paris with a camera in 1976, at
the age of 18, and has continued his photographic journey in many other cities, including Budapest, London, Prague, Venice, Vienna and Los Angeles. ‘‘Streets,’’ a show of
his several decades of work, is at the Galerie

WANDERING

Intervalle in Paris through July 19. Among
Mr. Petit’s photographs are ‘‘Paris 1979,’’ top,
and ‘‘Los Angeles 1995.’’ Of his style, he has
said: ‘‘I was diagnosed as nearsighted at the
age of 8. Before then, I believed the world
was a blur beyond two meters. So I probably
developed a taste for close things.’’

Malik Bendjelloul, Oscar winner for ‘Sugar Man,’ dies at 36
BY BRUCE WEBER

Malik Bendjelloul, a Swedish filmmaker
who won the 2013 Academy Award for
best documentary with his debut feature, ‘‘Searching for Sugar Man,’’ about
a forgotten American balladeer who,
unwittingly, had achieved fame halfway
O B I T U A RY

around the world, was found dead on
Tuesday in Stockholm. He was 36.
The police there confirmed the death
without immediately giving the cause.
But his brother Johar later told The Associated Press that Mr. Bendjelloul had
committed suicide, giving no other details. He told the daily newspaper Aftonbladet, The A.P. reported, that his brother had struggled with depression for a
short period.
A largely inexperienced filmmaker
when he started the project that became
‘‘Searching for Sugar Man,’’ Mr. Bendjelloul edited the film in his Stockholm
apartment and paid for most of it himself.
The film tells the story of Sixto

Rodriguez, a singer, songwriter and guitarist from Detroit who recorded two
blues-tinged folk-rock albums under the
single name Rodriguez in the early
1970s and then vanished from the music
scene, a casualty of poor publicity and
meager sales.
For decades, he supported himself
and three daughters doing manual
labor, unaware that his music — songs
of protest and hardscrabble life
rendered in a heartfelt tenor — had resonated in South Africa, where opponents of apartheid especially admired
his anthems of struggle.
The film takes its title from ‘‘Sugar
Man,’’ a song about a drug dealer that
appeared on Mr. Rodriguez’s 1970 album, ‘‘Cold Fact.’’
The film unearths Mr. Rodriguez’s
tale in the manner of a detective story,
telling of the search for information
about the singer that had been started
by an ardent fan, Stephen Segerman, a
Cape Town record store owner.
Reviewing the film in The New York
Times, Manohla Dargis called it ‘‘a
hugely appealing documentary about
fans, faith and an enigmatic Age of

Aquarius musician who burned bright
and hopeful before disappearing.’’
Mr. Bendjelloul was born in Ystad,
Sweden, on Sept. 14, 1977, and grew up in
Angelholm.
Published sources say that his father,
Hacène Bendjelloul, was an Algerian
doctor and that his mother, the former
Veronica Schildt, was a translator and a
painter. Information about survivors
was not available.
As a youth in the early 1990s, Mr.
Bendjelloul appeared in a recurring role
in the Swedish television series ‘‘Ebba
and Didrik,’’ about siblings in a seaside
village. (The director was his uncle.)
He studied journalism at the University of Kalmar (now Linnaeus University), and went on to make short documentary features for Swedish television
featuring interviews with musicians
like Björk and Elton John.
Restless, in 2006, he quit his job and
traveled to Africa in search of a story for
a movie of his own. In Cape Town, he
met Mr. Segerman, who in 1997 had created a website, The Great Rodriguez
Hunt, hoping to gather information
about the singer.

ANDERS WIKLUND/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE

Malik Bendjelloul, the director of the documentary ‘‘Searching for Sugar Man,’’ in 2012.

Ultimately, Mr. Bendjelloul was able
to interview Mr. Rodriguez and tell the
tale of the search in the film.
‘‘This was the greatest, the most
amazing, true story I’d ever heard, an
almost archetypal fairy tale,’’ he said in

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