Pierre Hemon Poster Master Project Gedabek 2013 .pdf


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The Gedabek epithermal Cu-Au deposit, Lesser Caucasus, Western Azerbaijan:
Geology, alterations, petrography and evolution of the sulfidation fluid states.
Pierre Hemon1, Robert Moritz1, Vagif Ramazanov2
1: University of Geneva, Department of Mineralogy, Rue des maraîchers 13, CH-1205 Geneva
2: University of Baku, Baku, Azerbaijan

Platform
European margin
( V = Volcanic Arc)
Tauride-Anatolide
and Armenian block(s)

1

45°N

European Platform
Caspian Sea

40°N

Metamorphic massifs
Black Sea

Sevan-Akera
suture zone

Ar

me

nia

nB

Strike slip faults

loc

k(s

)

Iranian
block(s)

1 - Introduction:

The Gedabek epithermal Cu-Au deposit is located within the Gedabek-Karadagh porphyry-epithermal ore district. It belongs to the SomkhetoKaradagh island arc, in the Lesser Caucasus, formed by the subduction of the Tethys ocean beneath the Eurasian active margin during Jurassic. The
closure of the Tethys is represented by the Sevan-Akera ophilitic suture zone, located between the still convergin Eurasian and Africa-Arabian plates
(and Armenian intra-blocks; Fig.1). Most of deposits from this area are linked to the Kimmeridgian intrusive event (Sosson et al., 2010).

35°N

Thrust
Arabian Platform

The aim of this study is to characterise the Gedabek ore deposit, currently exploited for gold, copper and silver by the Anglo Asian Mining PLC.
It was previously classified as Cu-Au-porphyry deposit (SRK, 2007) and more recently as a high-sulphidation deposit (SGS, 2010).

Gedabek-Karadagh
ore district

2

Andesitic volcanoclastic rocks (Bajocian)

Quaternary

Diorite (Kimmeridgian - 133-142 Ma)

Disseminated Pyrite

Quartz-porphyry body

Semi-massive mineralisation

Oxydation Zones

Carbonate veins

General geology of the Gedabek ore deposit (Fig. 2) consists of andesitic volcanoclastic rocks (Bajocian) intruded by a diorite massif

Breccia - Uncharacterised type

(Kimmeridgian). Ore mineralisation is associated with a flat silicified body named “quartz-porphyry body”, laying horizontally at the contact between the tuffs and the diorite.

Argillic alteration

Dykes
Faults

25°E

30°E

35°E

45°E

40°E

50°E

Fig.1: Tectonic Map of the Caucasus, after Rolland et al. (2010), modified.

2 - Gedabek Ore Deposit

Propylitic alteration is observed within tuffs surrounding the ore body and represented by chlorite and epidote mineralisation.
Pervasive silicifications is associated with the ore mineralisation. It is characterised by microcrystalline quartz (+/- adularia) together with
quartz phenocrysts (rhyolitic texture), sometimes the primary texture is still distinguishable (tuff clasts).

Argillic alteration is represented by sericite (+ traces of dickite and kaolinite) overprinting the silicified body. It is mapped in the central part of
the deposit. Vuggy silica occurence is also reported in a previous study on the Gedabek deposit (SGS, 2010).

3 - Mineralisation
Ore distribution: Mineralisation consists of disseminated pyrite together with pervasive silicification. Disseminated pyrite is observable within
most parts of the quartz-porphyry body. Semi-massive mineralisation and veins occur in the central part of the map (Fig. 2), spatially associated
with E-W faults and the later argillic alteration.

First stage : Quartz-adularia-pyrite

Third stage: Late copper stage

The first stage is represented by pyrite mineralisation within a gangue of
quartz and adularia. Pervasive quartz-adularia alteration is associated
with disseminated pyrite (Fig. 3a). More massive mineralisation (Fig.
3b) is associated with the central part of the deposit (Fig. 2) and shows
some transition with the second stage.

3a

qz

The third stage is represented by chalcocite, covellite and enargite replacing chalcopyrite and sphalerite from the second stage (Fig. 3e&f). Rare
fahlore are also observable surrounding chalcocite.

3b

ad

3e

enr

cc

cc

ad
py
150 μm

qz

py

py

The second stage is mainly represented by abundant chalcopyrite and
Fe-rich sphalerite (Fig. 3c), with some pyrrhotite and arsenopyrite inclusions. Locally Fe-poor sphalerite (Fig. 3d) is observable together with
rare chalcopyrite and fahlore.
More barite is observed in the quartz-adularia guangue associated with
Fe-poor sphalerite mineralisation.

3d

3i

This stage is represented by finely disseminated sulphides and does not
show any relation with other stages. It is dominated by tennantite and
galena mineralisation (Fig.3g) It is the only stage showing microscopically visible electrum grain. Electrum appears to be associated with hessite (Ag2Te), galena, tennantite and chalcopyrite (Fig.3h).

3g

3h

gn

qz-ad

qz

tn

Electrum

sp

gn

cp
0.5 cm

Fig.2: Geological map of the Gedabek ore deposit, modified after AAM PLC (2011).

Unreliable stage: Galena-tennantite-dominated

qz

qz-ad-bar

100 μm

Fig. 3e&f: Microphotographs (reflected light) of the third mineralisation stage

Second stage: Chalcopyrite-sphalerite-dominated

sp

enr

μm
100

Fig. 3a&b: Backscatter images of the first mineralisation stage
Light grey = adularia; Dark grey = quartz

3c

cp

cp

cv
250 μm

qz-ad+/-bar

3f

asp
1 cm

tn

20 μm

Sphalerite composition:
Fe-Rich
Fe-Poor

100 μm

Fig. 3c&d: Photographs (transmitted light) of thin sections from the second stage.

Fig.3g) Microphotograph of the galena-tennantite mineralisation (reflected light);
h) Backscatter image of an electrum grain and associated minerals.

4 - Sulphidation Fluid State Evolution

Gold Grade: 0.1 < Au <1ppm

1< Au <10ppm Au: 21ppm

Fig. 3i: Paragenetic sequence of mineralisations observed at Gedabek; plus general gold grades
Thick bars: dominant minerals; Thin bars: Common; Doted bars: Rare occurence.

First and second stages:

4a

Microprobe analyses were made on sphalerites from the first (inclusions in pyrite) and second stages. Sphalerites in equilibrium with
pyrite indicate variations from the lower and higher limits of the intermediate sulphidation state (Fig.4a). Various petrographic observation, made in large chalcopyrite crystals associated with Fe-rich spalerites, indicate a general increase of the sulphidation state of
the system:
- Fig.4b: According to Ramdohr (1969), the replacement of pyrrhotite by marcassite and/or pyrite can be due to an increase of the S
content of the system: FeS + S = FeS2.
- Fig. 4c: According to Bonev (1974), pyrite spheroids and are formed through a reconstructive reaction of Fe-rich chalcopyrite:
CuFeS2 = Cu + FeS2. Even if there is no addition of sulphur in this reaction, Bonev (1974) concluded that this reaction might take
place under condition of high sulphur potential at low temperature.
-Fig. 4d: Based on Craig (1983), sulphidation of a Fe-As rich chalcopyrite would explain the “graphic texture” represented by sphalerite, arsenopyrite, tennantite and galena.

Third Stage: Mineralisation of covellite preferencially replacing sphalerite, and mineralisation of enargite indicate a further increase
of the sulphidation state after the second stage.

Conclusion
This study classifies the Gedabek deposit as a quartz-adularia altered Cu-Au-Ag epithermal deposit with a general intermediate sulphidation state of the system. The evolution of the system from low/intermediate toward high sulphidation state explains the occurence of vuggy
silica and previous classifications of Gedabek as a high-sulphidation deposit.
Main References:

Bonev, (1974), Fourth IAGOD Symposium, Varna, Vol.II.
Craig, (1983), Mineralogical Magazine. Vol.47
Einaudi et al., (2003), SEG Spec. Publ. Vol.10.
SGS Canada (2010), AAM PLC files.
Sillitoe and Hedenquist (2003), SEG Spec. Publ. Vol.10.

Simmons et al., (2005), Econ. Geol. 100th Anniversary Vol.
Sosson et al., (2010), Geol. Soc. London, Spec. Publ., Vol.340.
SRK consulting (2007), AIMC files.
Ramdhor (1969), 3rd Edition, Pergamon Press.
Rolland et al., (2010), Geol. Soc. London, Spec. Publ., Vol.340.

Pyrrhotite replacement
by pyrite and marcassite
FeS + S = FeS2

cp
py

Pyrite spheroids replace
chalcopyrite
CuFeS2 = Cu + FeS2

4b

4c

cp

100 μm

100 μm

4d

sp

asp
tn

py
mrc+ba

« Graphic texture »
within chalcopyrite.

cp

100 μm

Fig.4: a) Microprobe analyses on different sphalerites from the first and second stages; The arrow indicates
the general evolution of the system; b) Pyrrhotite replacement by marcassite and pyrite within a large chalcopyrite. c) Pyrite spheroids within a large chalcopyrite. d) “Graphic texture” within chalcopyrite.


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