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Courses E – L
Course

Page

Energy Supply for Low Carbon Futures

3 - 16

Energy Systems and Thermal Processes

17 - 25

Engineering and Management of Manufacturing Systems (EMMS)

26 - 39

Environment and Public Policy

40 - 54

Environmental Engineering

55 - 67

Environmental Informatics

68 - 80

Environmental Management for Business

81 - 93

Environmental Risk Management

94 - 109

Environmental Water Management

110 - 123

Explosives Ordinance Engineering

124 - 135

Finance and Management

136 - 147

Flight Dynamics

148 - 152

Flow Assurance for Oil and Gas Production

153 - 168

Food Chain Systems

169 - 181

Forensic Computing

182 - 192

Forensic Programme

193 - 205

Geographical Information Management

206 - 217

Geospatial Intelligence

218 - 233

Global Product Development and Management

234 - 247

Guided Weapons Systems

248 - 256

Heath and the Environment

257 - 269

Human Factors and Safety Assessment in Aeronautics

270 - 279

Information Capability Management

280 - 288

Innovation for Creativity for Industry

289 - 300

Integrated Landscape Ecology

301 - 312

International Defence and Security

313 - 318

International Defence and Security Marketing

319 - 326

International Human Resource Management

327 - 338

International Security

339 - 345

Knowledge Management for Innovation

346 - 358

Land Reclamation and Restoration

359 - 370

Logistics and Supply Chain Management – Full time

371 - 382

Logistics and Supply Chain Management – Part time

383 - 388

COURSE STRUCTURE
Course information
Course title
Year
Valid entry routes (options)
Awards
Mode of delivery
Faculty
School(s)
Course Director

Energy Supply for Low Carbon Futures
2013/14
MSc, PGDip, PGCert

Other useful contacts

Dr Nigel Simms (Programme Director)

Full time & Part time
Environment, Science and Manufacturing
Applied Sciences
Dr A Encinas-Oropesa

Pass Criteria

MASTERS
Students must normally achieve a mark of 50% in each of the principal components of the course to pass. The principal components are (i) the
taught component; (ii) the group project (or dissertation for part time students); and (iii) the thesis. Students who pass the taught component
will progress to the group project.
The pass mark for each module within the taught component is also 50%.
Group/ Project (Dissertation for part time students) Component
Candidates must achieve at least 50% in this component to pass the MSc/MDes. Consideration of condonement will only be given if there are
mitigating circumstances accepted by the Mitigating Circumstances Panel and Exam Board.
Individual Project Component

1

Candidates must achieve at least 50% in this component to pass the MSc/MDes.
A candidate must achieve 50% or over in both of the assessments which make up the Individual Project Component. These assessments are a
written assessment in the form of a Thesis, and an oral assessment.
If a candidate achieves a mark of less than 50% in the written component (Thesis) of the individual project a decision will be made by the
examiners as to whether the Thesis is redeemable. If a Thesis is assessed as being redeemable then the opportunity to Revise and Represent
will be given. If a Thesis is viewed by the examiners to be irredeemable then the candidate will normally fail the Thesis component with no
opportunity to revise and represent.
A Thesis which is re-submitted following a Revise and Represent will have the mark capped at 50%.

PgDip
Students must normally achieve a mark of 50% in each of the principal components of the course to pass. The principal components are (i) the
taught component; and (ii) the group/design project (or dissertation for part time students). Students who pass the taught component will
progress to the group/design project.
The pass mark for each module within the taught component is also 50%.
Group/ Project (Dissertation for part time students) Component
Candidates must achieve at least 50% in this component to pass the PgDip. Consideration of condonement will only be given if there are
mitigating circumstances accepted by the Mitigating Circumstances Panel and Exam Board.

PgCert
Students must normally achieve an average mark of 50% to obtain a PgCert. The PgCert is achieved through passing 6 modules from the
taught programme.
The pass mark for each module within the taught component is 50%.

2

COURSE ELEMENTS LIBRARY (including taught modules, project modules and larger pieces of individual work)
#

Assessment
Assessment
and/or exam date

Credits

within

Contact hours

submission date

1

New –
share
with other
energy
courses

Induction

A EncinasOropesa

10

0

07/10/13

11/10/13

N/A

N/A

N/A

2

I-EMBA1122

Principles of Sustainability

P. Burgess

25

10

14/10/13

18/10/13

W

100%

25/10/13

3

I-ESLA2037

Demand Management for
Industry and the Built
Environment

A EncinasOropesa

25

10

28/10/13

01/11/13

W

100%

15/11/13

4

I-MESRETF

Renewable Energy
Technologies: Fundamentals

S. Wagland

25

10

04/11/13

08/11/13

W

100%

22/11/13

5

I-ESLA2038

Materials and Reliability in
Energy Systems

A. Encinas Oropesa

25

10

25/12/13

29/12/13

E

100%

07/01/14

6

I-MESA2032

Fuels and Energy
Conversion

H Gohari
Darabkhani

25

10

02/12/13

06/12/13

E

100%

10/01/14

7

I-MESRETS

Renewable Energy
Technologies: Systems

S. Wagland

25

10

13/01/14

17/01/14

E

100%

17/02/14

8

I-MESA2033

Energy Production,
Emissions Control, Carbon

K. Patchigolla

25

10

20/01/14

24/01/14

W

100%

07/02/14

Module
code
Title



Weighting

Module
Manager

Start Date

End Date

module

Type

(%)

Please note that all contact hours are indicative and represent scheduled teaching, which is subject to minor changes and variation at short notice.

3

Capture and Transport
9

I-EEMA1520

Energy Policy, Carbon
Markets and Futures

J Morris

27

10

10/02/14

14/02/14

W

100%

21/02/14

10

I-ESL-GP

Group Project

J Sumner / P
Longhurst

40

40

24/02/14

02/05/14

Group /
Individual

80% /

02/05/14

Dissertation (for part-time
student)

A EncinasOropesa

40

40

24/02/14

02/05/14

W

100%

02/05/14

Individual Thesis Project

Individually
assigned

40

80

6/05/14

12/09/14

Thesis
Oral

90%
10%

12/09/14

11
12

I-ESLTHESIS

4

20%

Please list all course elements that you consider to be the primary responsibility of another course (i.e. that this
course/option borrows from or shares with another existing course).
Module code

Module title
Principles of Sustainability
Renewable Energy Technologies: Fundamentals
Renewable Energy Technologies: Systems
Materials and Reliability in Energy Systems

Course/programme that the module is
borrowed from
/ Environment Programme
Renewable Energy Technology / Energy
Programme
Renewable Energy Technology / Energy
Programme
Materials for Energy Systems / Energy
Programme

CROSS-MODULAR ASSESSMENT (including any assessment which rests outside an individual module)
#

Title

Modules Covered

Assessment
Type

5

Weight (%)

EXIT ROUTES <<Start with exit award comprising the highest credit value, separating out different options of the course>>

MSc in Energy Supply for Low Carbon Futures
Description

COMPULSORY MODULES:
Induction Module
Modules 2-9
Group project or dissertation (PT)
Individual thesis project
ELECTIVE MODULES:
TOTAL:

Credits of set

Exam weighting
of set
(%, 1dp)

Modular exam weighting (%,to 1dp if
appropriate)

0
80
40
80

0
40
20
40

0
5
20
40

0

0

0

200

100

PgDip in Energy Supply for Low Carbon Futures
Description

COMPULSORY MODULES:
Induction Module
Modules 2-9
Group project or dissertation (PT)
ELECTIVE MODULES:
TOTAL:

Credits of set

Exam weighting
of set
(%, 1dp)

Modular exam weighting (%,to 1dp if
appropriate)

0
80
40

0
66.6
33.3

0
8.4
33.3

0

0

0

120

100

PgCert in Energy Supply for Low Carbon Futures
Description

Credits of set

Exam weighting
of set
(%, 1dp)

Modular exam weighting (%,to 1dp if
appropriate)

0
30

0
50%

0
16.7

ELECTIVE MODULES:
Three modules selected from the modules
2, 5, 6, 8 and 9

30

50%

16.7

TOTAL:

60

100

COMPULSORY MODULES:
Induction Module
Modules 3, 4 and 7

6

COURSE SUMMARY
Cranfield University: Course summaries
Course summaries (programme specifications) outline the content and structure of a course leading to
an award of Cranfield University. This version of the course summary has been approved by the relevant
Faculty of the University and every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information.
Courses are under constant review, however, and the University reserves the right, without notice, to
withdraw, update or amend this course summary at any time.

Date of publication
Last Reviewed

15 April 2012
15 April 2012

Energy Supply for Low Carbon Futures
1. What is the course?
Course information
Course title
Awards and exit routes (options)
Mode of delivery
Faculty
School(s)
Course Director
Awarding Body
Teaching Institution
Admissions body
Entry requirements
UK Qualifications Framework Level
Benchmark Statement(s)

Energy Supply for Low Carbon Futures
MSc, PgDip, PgCert
Full time and part time
Environment, Science and Manufacturing
School of Applied Science
Dr. K. Patchigolla
Cranfield University
Cranfield University
Cranfield University
Standard University entry requirements
QAA FHEQ level 7 (Masters)

Institutions delivering the course
This course is delivered by the Centre for Energy and Resource Technologies (CERT)
within the Department of Environmental Science and Technology in the School of
Applied Sciences, where the research interests include: specialist research in fossil fuel
power generation, energy conversion technologies, gas cleaning, CO2 capture and
transport, wet and dry renewable energy, biomass conversion and energy from waste,
materials for energy systems, amenity impacts, contaminated land landfill science, life
cycle engineering, policy appraisal and implementation, sustainable resource recovery,
process simulation, pipeline engineering, offshore materials engineering, subsea
engineering, risk management and reliability engineering,
The Energy Supply for Low Carbon Futures MSc course exists alongside the current
course programmes within the Department of Environmental Science and Technology

and contains contributions from the School of Engineering and the School of
Management.

Accreditation
Several of the modules have been derived from established courses that are already
accredited by different Chartered Institutions. Full course accreditation will be sought
with the Energy Institute

2. What are the aims of Cranfield University in providing the course?
Cranfield University offers this course in order to:






Prepare science and engineering graduates to meet the increasing demand of
industry, consultancies and the public sector for engineers in the energy
production and demand management sectors
Acquire an advanced theoretical and specialist understanding of processes and
practices central to low carbon emissions energy production technologies
Select and apply appropriate existing and emerging energy production
technologies that can achieve lower environmental impacts via an integrated
and cross-disciplinary approach
Enable the application of scientific, technical and engineering principles,
economic consequences and risks of energy production technologies options
as best practice
Develop the capacity to undertake successful technical research projects using
appropriate methods of critical analysis.

This programme is intended for the following range of students:




Graduates with science or related engineering degrees keen to pursue careers
in low carbon energy production technologies
Graduates currently in employment keen to extend their qualifications or to
pursue a career change
Individuals with other qualifications but who possess considerable relevant
experience

Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip) and Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert) exit routes are
provided for students who wish to access only parts of the course provided.

3. What should students expect to achieve in completing the course?
A. Postgraduate Certificate in Energy Supply for Low Carbon Futures
In completing this course, and achieving the associated award, a diligent student
should be able to:
Intended learning outcomes
(skills and knowledge)
On successful completion of the course a student
should be able to:













Understand and explain in broad terms the key
concepts and issues appertaining to the
availability and use of non-renewable and
renewable energy resources together with the
engineering principles and technologies that
underpin the production, distribution and use of
energy.
Analyse the principal sources and control of
pollution arising from energy production, along
with the importance of carbon control methods to
include carbon capture
Understand the principles of maintaining the
reliability of energy production and distribution
systems and their asset management.
Understand and apply concepts and principles of
energy demand management to improve and
enhance policy development and systems design;
Understand and appraise the mechanisms
involved in carbon markets and futures and their
potential influence on the availability, affordability
of energy and future energy policy development
Analyse relevant energy engineering problems and
design appropriate solutions taking account of
social, environmental, technical, regulatory and
commercial constraints;
Communicate effectively their work via oral and
written presentations and reports.

Teaching methods
Teaching and learning methods aim to promote
and develop the students as autonomous and
reflective learners. This will be achieved by
providing a structured underpinning knowledge
base which the students can test and expand
through project and case study coursework,
individually and in groups. The acquisition of
knowledge and understanding primarily will be
achieved via lectures supported by course notes.
Self-study will be directed through module
assignments and additional self-study to
complement lecture material. Case studies will play
a significant role in teaching and learning and these
will be complemented by demonstrations and site
visits. Students will be encouraged to reflect on
their learning throughout the programme and
through class tutorials.
Personal development planning will be developed
explicitly and implicitly during the course through
topics such as communication, time-management,
team work, learning strategies and project
management.
Additional training and self-study materials are
available for students to develop appropriate IT
skills, supported by academic staff in a pre-session
IT course and during the programme.
Technical English and foreign language training is
available in a structured programme in addition to
the academic course.

Types of assessment
Students will be assessed on their individual and
group work to reinforce the emphasis placed on the
application of learning. A balance between
continuous assessment through a mix of
summative and formative individual and group
assignments and examinations is undertaken and
these are designed to verify knowledge and
understanding.

B. . Postgraduate Diploma in Energy Supply for Low Carbon Futures
In addition to the intended learning outcomes outlined above, a diligent student would
also be expected to achieve:
Intended learning outcomes
(skills and knowledge)

Develop problem definition, hypothesis setting,
analysis and problem solving skills to address
challenges faced by environmental engineers.

Teaching methods
The teaching methods are the same as reported for
the Postgraduate Certificate.
The group project for full-time students will be
assessed by a combination of meetings during the
project, oral presentations and written report. The
ability of each student of the group to perform work
individually and as part of a team will be assessed
by the project supervisor(s). The dissertation for
part-time students will be assessed on a review of
available information including academic literature,
presentation of ideas and analysis and the
development of conclusions.

Types of assessment
The course will be assessed as two elements:
the taught modules by in-module assessment
(including a mix of summative and formative
coursework, which focuses on application of
principles studied and underpinning knowledge)
and examination of modules not assessed by other
means. This accounts for 67% of the assessment.
A group project allows the students to demonstrate
the application of knowledge acquired in the taught
modules. This accounts for 33% of the assessment.

C. MSc in Energy Supply for Low Carbon Futures
In addition to the intended learning outcomes outlined above, a diligent student would
also be expected to achieve:
Intended learning outcomes
(skills and knowledge)
Develop and deliver successful independent research
projects relevant to appropriate public and private
sector organizations.

Teaching methods
The written analysis of an environmental case,
which is designed to simulate an environmental
situation and test students' ability to apply
theoretical knowledge in practice. Continual
assessment and feedback on performance and
personal development is given to students with
suggested further study if required.

Types of assessment
The research project (40%), is assessed by a thesis
and an oral examination.

4. How is the course taught?
The MSc course will be taught in three sections: taught modules (40%), a group project
(20%), and an individual research project (40%).
The taught programme, typically delivered between October and February, comprises
a structured sequence of modules, each containing a series of lectures and other
classroom-based teaching, supplemented by practical work. The taught modules are
assessed by assignments and formal written examinations.
The Group Projects are founded on group-based research programmes typically
undertaken between February and April. The projects are designed to integrate
knowledge, understanding and skills from the taught modules in a real-life situation.
The thesis project, typically delivered between May and September, further develops
research and project management skills that: provide the ability to think and work in an
original way; contribute to knowledge; overcome genuine problems; and communicate
through a thesis and oral exam. Each student is allocated a supervisor, who will guide
and assess the student work.
Guidance sessions are provided as to what is required from thesis and oral
presentation.
Within induction week, students will be introduced to personal development planning
and asked to reflect on their transferable skills and to take ownership of their personal
development during the course.
The PgDip course consists of two of these sections: taught modules (66.7%) and
group projects (33.3%).
The PgCert course consists of one of these sections: taught modules (100%).
Candidates are required to pass three compulsory modules and three optional
modules (out of the eight taught modules).

5. How are students assessed?
The course is assessed as three elements:





the taught modules (40%) are assessed by in-module assessment (including
coursework, which focuses on application of principles studied and class tests,
which support underpinning knowledge) or examination in December and
January.
the group project (20%) is assessed by means of a written group report and an
oral presentation.
the research project (40%), is assessed by a thesis and an oral examination

6. How is the course structured?

Please see the course structure document for details on the individual elements of the
course.
Full-time students register for the course in October and are expected to complete the
course within 12 calendar months.
All options are also offered on a part-time basis and such students are expected to
complete the course within 2 to 3 years. Part-time students are not restricted to
starting in October. Instead they are offered individual guidance on the best sequence
of study based on their prior knowledge and availability to attend.

7. What do students need to achieve in order to graduate?
Notwithstanding University Regulations and the authorities and powers exercised by
examiners, students will normally need to demonstrate achievement in the elements of
the course, as laid out in the course structure document. Courses are structured
through the accumulation of credit, where 1 credit represents 10 notional learning
hours.
In brief, however, students will normally need to achieve the following in order to be
awarded the qualifications:

A Postgraduate Certificate
Students must successfully accumulate 60 credits through the assessment of taught
modules.

B. Postgraduate Diploma
Students must successfully accumulate 80 credits as taught modules (80 credits), and
40 credits through group projects or work-based projects. Students must normally
pass all elements of the course: condonement rules within the School of Applied
Sciences are outlined in the Course Handbook

C. MSc
Students must successfully accumulate 80 credits as taught modules, 40 credits through
group projects or work-based projects, and 80 credits through an individual research
project and oral presentation. Students must normally pass all elements of the course;
condonement rules within the School of Applied Sciences are outlined in the Course
Handbook.
If a student does not meet the required standards for the award, the examiners for the
programme may decide to offer a lower award associated with the programme,
providing that the student meets the requirements of the lower award.

8. Does the course have any academic or industrial partners?

The course is part of the suite of the MSc courses currently provided within CERT.
Current members of the Industrial Advisory Panel (chosen from among EoN, EDF,
RWEnpower, BP, Environ, WRG, Shanks, CIWEM, CIWH, Doosan Energy Systems,
Alstom Power, Siemens, Rolls Royce, Caterpillar, BOC/Linde, Air Products, Shell,
AMEC, Mott MacDonald) will also help in steering and updating the course content.
Cranfield University also actively seeks sponsorship and support for individual thesis
projects from the energy sector employers to provide professional experience and
development opportunities for students through group study project and thesis
sponsorships.

9. How will the University assure the quality of the provision?
External Examiner: the course will be reviewed by an external examiner on an annual
basis, who will submit a formal report to the Vice Chancellor. The external examiner has
already been identified.
The course will be reviewed by the Industry Advisory Panel chosen and when
accredited by the Chartered Institution.
Course Team: a course team comprising the Course Director, teaching staff and the
academic administrator will hold at least two meetings each year to review the course
in addition to the meetings with the Industrial Advisory Panel.
Student feedback. Following Faculty guidance the Energy Production for Low Carbon
Futures course will adhere to a feedback system, which is composed of 3 elements:




Module based questionnaires – handed out on the last day of the module these
questionnaires ask for quantitative feedback on each session during the module
for FT and PT students
Course meetings – 2 meetings held every year to provide a structured
opportunity for students to give feedback on modules, laboratory exercises,
GDPs, theses, exams, facilities – all aspects of the courses
Overall course questionnaires – distributed at the end of the courses

10. What opportunities are graduates likely to have on completing the
course?
On completion, graduates will have a broad network of global contact and increased
opportunities for individual specialism in their chosen career in the energy production
and demand management industries.

COURSE STRUCTURE
Course information
Course title
Year
Valid entry routes (options)
Awards
Mode of delivery
Faculty
School(s)
Course Director

Energy Systems and Thermal Processes
2013/14
MSc, PGCert

Other useful contacts

Mrs Kirsty Cain & Miss Melissa Lucas, Course Administrators

Full time/Part time
Engineering and Aerospace
School of Engineering
Dr Ilai Sher

Pass Criteria
MSc
Candidates must satisfy the following requirements:


The average mark achieved for the taught component of the course must be at least 50%. This mark is a weighted average of the results of assessment of
individual taught modules according to their respective credit ratings. A student should not obtain an overall module mark of less than 40% in more than 30% of
the taught modules, counted according to their credit ratings.



In addition, an overall average mark of 50% must be achieved for the Individual Research Project element. The mark for the written thesis must be no less than
50%.

PGCert


The average mark achieved (taught modules) must be at least 50%. This mark is a weighted average of the results of assessment of individual taught modules
according to their respective credit ratings. A student should not obtain an overall module mark of less than 40% in more than 30% of the taught modules,
counted according to their credit ratings.
1

COURSE ELEMENTS LIBRARY (including taught modules, project modules and larger pieces of individual work)
Assessment

G-MT

Title
PSE02 Management for Technology

Module Manager
Mr Stephen Carver

N-PSE-EM

PSE04 Environmental Management

N-PSE-PMS
N-PSE-ACS

Credits

Module Code

Contact hours

Last
Assessm
ent Date

Start Date

End Date
Type

54

10

20.01.14

28.01.14

30.01.14

Dr Ilai Sher

30

10

03.02.14

07.02.14

17.03.14

PSE10 Process Measurement Systems

Prof Hoi Yeung

30

10

24.02.14

28.02.14

25.04.14

PSE12 Advanced Control Systems

Dr Yi Cao

30

10

06.01.14

10.01.14

25.04.14

N-PSE-HT

PSE15 Heat Transfer

Dr Ilai Sher

30

15

14.10.13

18.10.13

13.12.13

N-PSEPGRES
N-PSE-CETIP

PSE16 Power Generation Systems

Dr Ilai Sher

30

10

28.10.13

01.11.13

PSE17 Computational Fluid Dynamics

Dr Karl Jenkins

30

10

17.03.14

N-PSE-IHS

PSE18 Industrial Heating Systems

Dr Ilai Sher

30

10

PSE19 Thermal Systems Operation and
Design
PSE20: Renewable Energy
Technologies, Policy and Markets
PSE21 Energy Management for
Industry

Dr Ilai Sher

30

Dr Athanasios
Kolios
Dr Ilai Sher

N-PSE-TSOD

N-PSE-EMI



Assessment
Weighting

submission

within

date and/or

module

exam date

(%)

EXAM
CW
CW

80%
20%
100%

30.01.14
28.01.14

50%
50%
50%
50%
67%
33%
100%

25.04.14
22.04.14
25.04.14
24.02.14
13.12.13
04.11.13

02.12.13

EXAM
CW
EXAM
CW
EXAM
CW
CW

21.03.14

28.04.14

CW

100%

28.04.14

21.10.13

25.10.13

13.12.13

EXAM

100%

13.12.13

10

11.11.13

15.11.13

25.04.14

10

13.01.14

17.01.14

17.02.14

70%
30%
100%

25.04.14
16.12.13

30

EXAM
CW
CW

30

15

17.02.14

21.02.14

30.06.14

EXAM
PROJ

33%
67%

31.05.14
30.06.14

Please note that all contact hours are indicative and represent scheduled teaching, which is subject to minor changes and variation at short notice.

2

17.03.14

02.12.13

17.02.14

N-PSETHESIS

IRP Individual Research Project

CW = coursework
WAC = written analysis of cases

Dr Ilai Sher

EXAM = written examination
PRES = oral progress presentations

20

100

15.12.13

08.09.14

12.09.14

PRES
TWRIT

10%
90%

13.06.14
12.09.14

PROJ = group project work
TWRIT = Thesis

Please list all course elements that you consider to be the primary responsibility of another course (i.e. that this course/option borrows from or shares with another existing
course).
Module Code

Module title
PSE 02: Management for Technology

Course/programme that the module is borrowed from
Provided by the School of Management and shared with
other courses in the School of Engineering.

PSE10: Process Measurement Systems, PSE12: Advanced Control Systems

Provided (for their students and ours) by the Process
Systems Engineering MSc course of our department.

PSE20: Renewable Energy Technologies, Policy and Markets

Provided (for their students and ours) by the Renewable
Energy Engineering MSc course of our department.

PSE04, PSE15, PSE16, PSE17, PSE18, PSE19, and PSE21 are owned by this course (ESTP).

3

EXIT ROUTES <<Start with exit award comprising the highest credit value, separating out different options of the course>>

MSc
Description

Credits of set

Exam weighting
of set
(%, 1dp)

Modular exam weighting (%,to 1dp if
appropriate)

COMPULSORY MODULES:
modules PSE 02, PSE 04, PSE 16, PSE 18,
PSE 19 & PSE 20

60

30%

5% each

modules PSE 15 & PSE 21

30

15%

7.5% each

MSc project (IRP)
ELECTIVE MODULES:
1 module chosen from PSE 10, PSE 12 or
PSE 17

100

50%

50%

10

5%

5%

TOTAL:

200

100%

-

Credits of set

Exam weighting
of set
(%, 1dp)

Modular exam weighting (%,to 1dp if
appropriate)

Any 60 credits from the taught part, with
no more than one module from the
electives (PSE10, PSE12, PSE17).

60

100%

16.67% or 25% (for PSE15 or PSE21)

TOTAL:

60

100%

-

PGCert
Description

4

COURSE SUMMARY
Cranfield University: Course summaries
Course summaries (programme specifications) outline the content and structure of a course leading to an
award of Cranfield University. This version of the course summary has been approved by the relevant Faculty
of the University and every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information. Courses are under
constant review, however, and the University reserves the right, without notice, to withdraw, update or amend
this course summary at any time.

Date of publication
Last Reviewed

30th August 2010
01 March 2013

Energy Systems and Thermal Processes MSc

1. What is the course?
Course information
Course title
Awards and exit routes (options)
Mode of delivery
Faculty
School(s)
Course Director

Energy Systems and Thermal Processes MSc
MSc
full time &/or part time
Engineering and Aerospace
School of Engineering
Dr Ilai Sher

Awarding Body
Teaching Institution
Admissions body
Entry requirements
UK Qualifications Framework Level
Benchmark Statement(s)

Cranfield University
Cranfield University
Cranfield University
standard University entry requirements
QAA FHEQ level 7 (Masters)

Institutions delivering the course
This course is delivered by the Process Systems Engineering Group of the Department of Offshore,
Process and Energy Engineering, School of Engineering where the research interests include:







Process and Energy Systems Design, Simulation and Optimisation
Multi-Phase Flow and Processes
Flow Measurement
Process Control
Technical and Economic Viability Assessments of Conventional and Renewable Energy Systems
Environmental Protection

Teaching and/or assessment is also provided by the School of Management and School of Applied
Sciences of Cranfield University: Cranfield University remains fully responsible for the quality of
delivery of the course.

Accreditation
This course is accredited formally by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) and the
Energy Institute (EI).

2. What are the aims of Cranfield University in providing the course?
Cranfield University offers this course in response to the growing concerns about the need for the
conservation of energy and for combating the increasing environmental degradation. The course,
established in 1972, was the first of its type to be instituted in Europe, and remains the most prestigious
degree in technical energy management in the UK. Achieving energy efficiency and reducing
environmental pollution are increasingly important aspects of professional engineering. The course is
designed to equip graduates and practicing engineers with an in-depth understanding of the
fundamental issues of energy thrift and environmental consequences of irrational use of energy
resources in the industrial and commercial sectors. It furnishes students with the up to date technical
knowledge and skills required for achieving the better management of energy, designing of energyefficient systems and processes and the reduction and control of pollution cost-effectively. This
knowledge can be directly applied to help various sectors of the economy in improving their
competitiveness in the face of dwindling resources, probable substantial increases in unit energy costs
and the urgent requirement to comply with the increasingly-restrictive pollution-control standards. The
course prepares students for a successful career as energy professionals in a wide range of industries,
consultancies, research organisations and local and central government departments. The course has
evolved over the past 38 years from discussions with Industrial Advisory Panels, employers, sponsors
and previous students. The content of the programme of study is up-dated regularly to reflect changes
arising from technical advances, economic factors and changes in legislation, regulations and
standards.
This programme is intended for the following range of students:


Engineering and applied science graduates and practicing engineers interested in energy and
its efficient utilisation in industrial and commercial applications.



Applicants are required to have at least a UK 2nd class honours degree or its equivalent.
Applications from candidates with lesser qualifications but with considerable relevant working
experience will be considered.

3. What should students expect to achieve in completing the course?
In completing this course, and achieving the associated award, a diligent student should be able to:
Intended learning outcomes
(skills and knowledge)
(i)

(ii)

(iii)
(iv)

(v)
(vi)
(vii)
(viii)
(ix)
(x)
(xi)
(xii)

Competently formulate the current concepts and
theories governing energy flows, heat transfer and
energy conversion, when analysing energy
systems
Critically appraise the technical, economic and
environmental issues involved in power
generation and management of energy in industry
and commerce
Assess complicated energy systems/thermal
processes, proposing designs for a cost-effective
conservation of energy
Design energy-efficient systems and processes,
applying a range of software-tools employed in
fluid flow and heat transfer analyses, system and
process modelling, and process-control and
energy management
Manage technical projects, people, technology
marketing, and product development, including
finance principles
Critically assess current research/development in
selected topics in the area of energy systems and
thermal processes
Undertake independent learning, especially via
the effective use of information retrieval systems
Professionally approach problem solving, critically
appraising technical and/or commercial literature
Manage research studies, and plan and execute
energy-related projects
Communicate effectively both orally and in writing
Practice good time management and work
effectively to deadlines
Operate effectively in a team

Teaching methods
 Combination of structured lectures, tutorial
sessions and computer-based workshops and
private study
 Seminars delivered by invited industrial or
academic experts in some areas covered by the
course
 Visits to industrial sites
 Knowledge and understanding are further
developed
and enhanced through the
assignments associated with some of the taught
modules and the final MSc research project
 Timely and informative feedbacks on the
assignments are an essential part of the learning
process

Types of assessment
 Written examinations
 Course work (i.e. individual assignments and
group projects)
 MSc thesis (Report and progress oral
presentations)

4. How is the course taught?
In addition to the teaching methods outlined in Section 3, students will be supported in their learning
and personal development by:




A dedicated electronic Blackboard site
One-day workshop in MATLAB training
Arrangement of attendance of relevant modules offered by other MSc programmes

5. How are students assessed?
The course uses a range of assessment types. Students can expect to have 7 – 8 written
examinations, 7 pieces of assessment by submitted work and 4 – 5 elements of assessment by
presentation or viva. This approach has been adopted in order to:




Assess the knowledge of the students using methods appropriate to the nature of the subject
area
Help the students to improve their technical writing and oral presentation skills

6. How is the course structured?
Please see the course structure document for details on the individual elements of the course.
Full-time students register for the course in October and are expected to complete the course within
12 calendar months.
This course is also offered on a part-time basis. Students would instead attend the required modules
of the taught component according to the scheduled agreed with the course director. MSc research
projects are commonly undertaken in collaboration with the candidate’s place of work.
With the exception of PSE 02: Management for Technology, each module is taught over one week,
with the second week largely free of structured teaching to allow time for more independent learning
and reflection. PSE 02 is taught over 7 working days.

7. What do students need to achieve in order to graduate?
Notwithstanding University Regulations and the authorities and powers exercised by examiners,
students will normally need to demonstrate achievement in the elements of the course, as laid out in
the course structure document. Courses are structured through the accumulation of credit, where 1
credit represents 10 notional learning hours.
In brief, however, students will normally need to achieve the following in order to be awarded the
qualifications:
Successful passes in 9 taught (8 compulsory and one optional) modules (100 credits) and the
successful completion of an individual research project and its related assessment (100 credits) on a
subject chosen by the student in a relevant field. Students must normally pass all elements of the
course: some condonement rules may apply.

8. Does the course have any academic or industrial partners?
No

9. How will the University assure the quality of the provision?
Course delivery and curriculum review by the Course Team. This is carried out regularly to maintain the
relevance of the course by incorporating modifications arising from technical advances, economic
factors and changes in legislation, regulations and standards. Consultations with our industrial research
partners, members of the Industrial Advisory Panel of the course, course external examiners, graduate
employers, and current and former students provide very valuable information for the course team to
formulate necessary adjustments.
Student feedback mechanisms, both quantitative and qualitative (on course content and provision).
Feedback from the students is an important mechanism for enhancing the quality of the course and its
delivery. The students elect a Students’ Representative from the student group. The Students’
Representative acts as a communication link between students and staff and represents the student

group on committees of the School and the University. Feedback from the students is sought during
the academic session in the following format:


Students are invited to feed their comments/concerns about the course, either individually or via the
Students' Representative, to the Course Director at any time during the year. Concerns about
research projects are discussed with supervisors in the first instance and then with the Course
Director.



Each student is asked to fill in a Lecture-Course Evaluation Questionnaire for each individual
Module. These forms provide feedback to the individual lecturers involved and will be subsequently
discussed with the Course Director and the Course Team in order to make any necessary
adjustments.



Each student is asked to fill in an MSc Lecture Programme Evaluation Questionnaire and a
Research Project and Final Assessment Questionnaire forms and hand these in after completing
the respective components of the course.

Mechanisms for feedback to students (on formative and summative assessment). Results of
assessment (assignments and written examinations) are announced to individual students within the
time guidelines issued by the University. Students are encouraged to borrow their submitted
assignments after marking and discuss the feedback with the member of the Course team involved.
Use of external examiners, directly and through consideration of reports. The course employs the
services of two external examiners, one on each option. They provide very valuable quality
assurance mechanism via:







Reviewing examination papers and marking schemes
Reviewing examples of assessed work
Attending some of the MSc project presentation sessions
Reviewing examples of submitted MSc theses
Attending the Board of Examiners meeting at the end of the academic year and providing the
course team during the meeting with verbal report
Completing an annual course report

10. What opportunities are graduates likely to have on completing the course?
Graduates of the course have been successful in gaining employment in:







Energy, environmental and engineering consultancies and design practices
Industry
Research organisations
Central government departments
Local governments
Academic institutions

COURSE STRUCTURE
Course information
Course title
Year
Valid entry routes (options)
Awards
Mode of delivery
Faculty
School(s)
Course Director

Engineering and Management of Manufacturing Systems
2013/14
MSc, PGDip, PGCert

Other useful contacts

Dr Benny Tjahjono (Programme Director)
Ms Emanuela Pennetta (Course Administration)
Mrs Linda Willsher-Pritchard (Course Administration)

Full Time/Part Time
Environment, Science and Manufacturing
School of Applied Sciences
Dr Peter Ball

Pass Criteria

MASTERS
Students must normally achieve a mark of 50% in each of the principal components of the course to pass. The principal components are (i) the
taught component; (ii) the group project (or dissertation for part time students); and (iii) the thesis. Students who pass the taught component
will progress to the group project.
The pass mark for each module within the taught component is also 50%.
Group/ Project (Dissertation for part time students) Component
Candidates must achieve at least 50% in this component to pass the MSc/MDes. Consideration of condonement will only be given if there are
mitigating circumstances accepted by the Mitigating Circumstances Panel and Exam Board.
Individual Project Component

Candidates must achieve at least 50% in this component to pass the MSc/MDes.
A candidate must achieve 50% or over in both of the assessments which make up the Individual Project Component. These assessments are a
written assessment in the form of a Thesis, and an oral assessment.
If a candidate achieves a mark of less than 50% in the written component (Thesis) of the individual project a decision will be made by the
examiners as to whether the Thesis is redeemable. If a Thesis is assessed as being redeemable then the opportunity to Revise and Represent
will be given. If a Thesis is viewed by the examiners to be irredeemable then the candidate will normally fail the Thesis component with no
opportunity to revise and represent.
A Thesis which is re-submitted following a Revise and Represent will have the mark capped at 50%.

PgDip
Students must normally achieve a mark of 50% in each of the principal components of the course to pass. The principal components are (i) the
taught component; and (ii) the group/design project (or dissertation for part time students). Students who pass the taught component will
progress to the group/design project.
The pass mark for each module within the taught component is also 50%.
Group/ Project (Dissertation for part time students) Component
Candidates must achieve at least 50% in this component to pass the PgDip. Consideration of condonement will only be given if there are
mitigating circumstances accepted by the Mitigating Circumstances Panel and Exam Board.

PgCert
Students must normally achieve an average mark of 50% to obtain a PgCert. The PgCert is achieved through passing 6 modules from the
taught programme.
The pass mark for each module within the taught component is 50%.

COURSE ELEMENTS LIBRARY (including taught modules, project modules and larger pieces of individual work)
#

1



Title

Benny
Tjahjono

Credits

Module code

Module
Manager

Contact hours

Assessment

30

Weighting

Assessment hand in

within module

date and/or exam

(%)

date

Start Date

End Date

7 Oct 13

11 Oct 13

None

0

Type

NEW –
SHARED
WITH
OTHER MAN
COURSES

Induction

2

I-MNUA1034

Operations Management

Andrew
Johnstone

32

10

14 Oct 13

18 Oct 13

Exam

100

15 Nov 13

3

I-MNUA1031

Enterprise Systems

Essam
Shehab

32

10

21 Oct 13

25 Oct 13

Exam

100

4 Dec 13

4

I-MNUA1029

Operations Analysis

Peter Ball

32

10

4 Nov 13

8 Nov 13

Exam

100

20 Dec 13

5

I-MNUA1018

General Management

Yuchun Xu

32

10

18 Nov 13

22 Nov 13

Exam

100

10 Jan 14

6

I-MNUA1027

Manufacturing Systems
Engineering

Benny
Tjahjono

32

10

25 Nov 13

29 Nov 13

Assignment

100

9 Jan 14

7

I-MNUA1021

Management of
Technology and
Innovation

Leon
Williams

32

10

9 Dec 13

13 Dec 13

Assignment

100

15 Jan 14

8

I-MNUA1038

Supply Chain
Management

Alexandra
Brintrup

32

10

13 Jan 14

17 Jan 14

Assignment

100

31 Jan 14

0

Please note that all contact hours are indicative and represent scheduled teaching, which is subject to minor changes and variation at short notice.

9

I-MNUA1019

Manufacturing Strategy

Patrick
McLaughlin

32

10

20 Jan 14

24 Jan 14

Assignment

100

7 Feb 14

10

I-MNU-GRPP

Manufacturing Masters
Programme Group Project

Dependent
on project
allocation

40

40

1 Feb 14

30 Apr 14

Group
Individual

80
20

31 May 14

Dependent
on project
allocation

40

80

13 May 14

12 Sept
14

Thesis

90

20 Sept 14

Oral

10

(or Dissertation for Part
Time Students, assessed
100% on report)
11

I-MNUTHESIS

Individual Thesis Project

Please list all course elements that you consider to be the primary responsibility of another course (i.e. that this course/option borrows from or shares with another existing
course).
Module code

Module title
Enterprise Systems

Course/programme that the module is borrowed from
MSc Management and Information Systems

CROSS-MODULAR ASSESSMENT (including any assessment which rests outside an individual module)
#

Title

Modules Covered

Assessment
Type

Not applicable

Weight (%)

EXIT ROUTES

MSc in Engineering and Management of Manufacturing Systems
Description

COMPULSORY MODULES:
Induction
Modules 2-9
Group Project
Individual Project
ELECTIVE MODULES:

TOTAL:

Credits of set

Exam weighting of set
(%, 1dp)

Modular exam weighting (%,to 1dp if appropriate)

0
80
40
80

0
40
20
40

0
5
20
40

200

100

PGDip in Engineering and Management of Manufacturing Systems
Description

COMPULSORY MODULES:
Induction
Modules 2-9
Group Project
ELECTIVE MODULES:

TOTAL:

Credits of set

Exam weighting of set
(%, 1dp)

Modular exam weighting (%,to 1dp if appropriate)

0
80
40

0
66.6
33.3

0
8.3
33.3

120

100

PGCert in Engineering and Management of Manufacturing Systems
Description

COMPULSORY MODULES:
Induction
Modules 2, 5, 6 and 7
ELECTIVE MODULES:
Modules 3, 4 and 8
(2 of these)
TOTAL:

Credits of set

Exam weighting of set
(%, 1dp)

Modular exam weighting (%,to 1dp if appropriate)

0
40

0
66.6

0
16.6

20

33.3

16.6

60

100

COURSE SUMMARY
Cranfield University: Course summaries
Course summaries (programme specifications) outline the content and structure of a course leading to an
award of Cranfield University. This version of the course summary has been approved by the relevant Faculty
of the University and every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information. Courses are under
constant review, however, and the University reserves the right, without notice, to withdraw, update or amend
this course summary at any time.

Date of publication
Last Reviewed

27 September 2010
27 September 2010

Engineering & Management of Manufacturing Systems
1. What is the course?
Course information
Course title
Awards and exit routes (options)
Mode of delivery
Faculty
School(s)
Course Director

Engineering & Management of Manufacturing Systems
MSc, PgDip, PgCert
Full time & Part time
Environment, Science & Manufacturing
School of Applied Sciences
Dr Peter Ball

Awarding Body
Teaching Institution
Admissions body
Entry requirements
UK Qualifications Framework Level
Benchmark Statement(s)

Cranfield University
Cranfield University
Cranfield University
Standard University entry requirements
QAA FHEQ level 7 (Masters)

Institutions delivering the course
This course is delivered by the Manufacturing Department, School of Applied Sciences, where the
research interests include manufacturing systems engineering, product-service systems, supply
chain management, simulation and modelling and innovation management.

Accreditation
This course is accredited formally by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE), the Institution
of Engineering & Technology (IET) and the Royal Aeronautical Society (RAeS) until September 2014.

2. What are the aims of Cranfield University in providing the course?
The aim of this course is to further develop suitably trained and qualified individuals by providing
them with the knowledge and skills necessary to make an immediate contribution to a company’s
manufacturing performance and operations.

Cranfield University offers this course in order to:







To prepare graduates for a role in manufacturing engineering with an understanding of
business functions and strategies.
To engage students in independent and critical evaluation of the use of operations
management concepts, issues and tools to address manufacturing industry problems.
To provide students with an appreciation of manufacturing technologies and concepts
To equip students in transferable skills such as analytical, management and interpersonal
skills needed for the creative and effective application of knowledge to address operations
management problems in industry.
To develop general and personal management skills needed to implement and influence
change.
To enhance a student’s career in the manufacturing and related sectors

Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip) and Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert) exit routes are provided for
students who wish to access only parts of the course provided.
This programme is intended for the following range of students:




Those wishing to work nationally or internationally with manufacturing companies that need
to address manufacturing systems problems.
Those wishing to work in manufacturing and operations management consultancy.
Those wishing to work in the public/government sector on industry competitiveness and
productivity issues.

3. What should students expect to achieve in completing the course?
A. Postgraduate Certificate
In completing this course, and achieving the associated award, a diligent student should be able to:
Intended learning outcomes
(skills and knowledge)
1. Develop and demonstrate a systematic
understanding and critical awareness of a
manufacturing enterprise functions including
manufacturing systems, management
accounting, human resource management,
and strategy development
2. Demonstrate a comprehensive of
understanding of techniques needed for
credible manufacturing system design and
improvement projects
3. Show originality in application of in-depth
knowledge of manufacturing operations
development and critically evaluate the
appropriate applications of methodologies.
4. Critically evaluate theories for the analysis and
design tools and their application to (a) solve
manufacturing problems in terms of
technology and/or organisations and (b)
increase the effectiveness of manufacturing
systems
5. Demonstrate transferable skills including,
personal responsibility, complex decision
making and independence for further learning

Teaching methods
 Lectures, case studies, group exercises
and computer-based demonstrations and
exercises are used to transfer the
necessary knowledge. Understanding is
developed through a series of case studies
and exercises.
 Formative feedback on assessed
assignments enhances the learning
process and informal feedback on nonassessed individual or group exercises is
also used
 Many of the skills are discussed during
lectures and demonstrated during class
exercises including class and group
discussions and presentations. IT skills
are practiced during computer-based
demonstrations/tutorials.
Types of assessment
 Each module is assessed by exam or by
assignment appropriate to the nature of the
subject. Subjects that have a large theory
content are assessed by exam, and

6. Develop a sound theoretical approach to
critically evaluate data and information,
undertaking a critical appraisal of technical
and/or commercial literature
7. Demonstrate the ability to apply practical and
rigorous approaches to identify projects,
develop engineering solutions and evaluate
their effectiveness
8. Propose and bring about improvements to
appropriate business standards

assignments are used where practical
application is key to the development of
understanding in a subject (e.g. computer
based methodologies) or when knowledge
and understanding may be demonstrated
through discussion of a particular topic.
 The application of the skills is assessed in
the exams and assignments.

B. Postgraduate Diploma
In addition to the intended learning outcomes outlined above, a diligent student would also be
expected to achieve:
Intended learning outcomes
(skills and knowledge)
1. Develop and demonstrate a systematic
understanding and critical awareness of a
manufacturing enterprise functions including
manufacturing systems, management
accounting, human resource management,
and strategy development
2. Demonstrate a comprehensive of
understanding of techniques needed for
credible manufacturing system design and
improvement projects
3. Show originality in application of in-depth
knowledge of manufacturing operations
development and critically evaluate the
appropriate applications of methodologies.
4. Critically evaluate theories for the analysis and
design tools and their application to (a) solve
manufacturing problems in terms of
technology and/or organisations and (b)
increase the effectiveness of manufacturing
systems
5. Deal with complex problems and
communicate effectively the results of group
project/dissertation to specialist and nonspecialist audiences, both orally and in writing
6. Demonstrate transferable skills including,
personal responsibility, complex decision
making and independence for further learning
7. Develop a sound theoretical approach to
critically evaluate data and information,
undertaking a critical appraisal of technical
and/or commercial literature
8. Demonstrate the ability to apply practical and
rigorous approaches to identify projects,
develop engineering solutions and evaluate
their effectiveness
9. Demonstrate ability to provide technical and

Teaching methods
 Lectures, case studies, group exercises
and computer-based demonstrations and
exercises are used to transfer the
necessary knowledge. Understanding is
developed through a series of case studies
and exercises, as well as during the
application of knowledge during the group
project. Knowledge is also enhanced by
research and private study necessary for
the successful completion of these
projects.
 Many of the skills are discussed during
lectures and demonstrated during class
exercises including class and group
discussions and presentations. IT skills
are practiced during computer-based
demonstrations/tutorials.
 Formative feedback on assessed
assignments enhances the learning
process and informal feedback on nonassessed individual or group exercises is
also used.
 The group project requires the students to
work in teams, under academic
supervision. The students are given overall
responsibility for an industrially oriented
type project, usually for a sponsoring
company, working within tight timescales
and a fixed budget. The group project is
intended to develop time management,
team working and communication skills
both oral and written.
Types of assessment
 Each module is assessed by exam or by
assignment appropriate to the nature of the
subject. Subjects that have a large theory

commercial leadership through planning
industrial/research projects (budgets, people,
tasks) and contributing to teams delivering
under time pressures individually and as a
team member.
10. Propose and bring about improvements to
appropriate business standards

content are assessed by exam, and
assignments are used where practical
application is key to the development of
understanding in a subject (e.g. computer
based methodologies) or when knowledge
and understanding may be demonstrated
through discussion of a particular topic.
Application of the knowledge and its
understanding is also assessed through
the group project.
 Group projects are assessed by a
combination of work/meetings during the
project, oral presentations and written
reports. In all three, the performance of
each student of the group is assessed.
The ability to work in a team is assessed in
the group project. Assessment by the
project supervisor(s) is checked by peer
ranking within the teams. This project,
worth 40 credits and which the student
must successfully complete, is assessed
by Report (50%), Presentation (15%),
Poster (5%) and Individual contribution
(30%).

C. Master of Science
In addition to the intended learning outcomes outlined above, a diligent student would also be
expected to achieve:
Intended learning outcomes
(skills and knowledge)
1. Develop and demonstrate a systematic
understanding and critical awareness of a
manufacturing enterprise functions including
manufacturing systems, management
accounting, human resource management,
and strategy development
2. Demonstrate a comprehensive of
understanding of techniques needed for
credible manufacturing system design and
improvement projects
3. Show originality in application of in-depth
knowledge of manufacturing operations
development and critically evaluate the
appropriate applications of methodologies.
4. Critically evaluate theories for the analysis and
design tools and their application to (a) solve
manufacturing problems in terms of
technology and/or organisations and (b)
increase the effectiveness of manufacturing
systems
5. Deal with complex problems and
communicate effectively the results of group
project/dissertation to specialist and non-

Teaching methods
 Lectures, case studies, group exercises
and computer-based demonstrations and
exercises are used to transfer the
necessary knowledge. Understanding is
developed through a series of case studies
and exercises, as well as during the
application of knowledge during the group
project and the thesis project. Knowledge
is also enhanced by research and private
study necessary for the successful
completion of these projects.
 Formative feedback on assessed
assignments enhances the learning
process and informal feedback on nonassessed individual or group exercises is
also used.
 Many of the skills are discussed during
lectures and demonstrated during class
exercises including class and group
discussions and presentations. IT skills
are practiced throughout the period of
study.
 The group project requires the students to
work in teams, under academic

specialist audiences, both orally and in writing
6. Demonstrate independent and original
research on a subject relevant to
manufacturing system development and
management involving project planning,
development of new skills, critical evaluation
of results and discussion of findings using
methodologies that show further knowledge
and understanding in future work
7. Demonstrate transferable skills including,
personal responsibility, complex decision
making and independence for further learning
8. Develop a sound theoretical approach to
critically evaluate data and information,
undertaking a critical appraisal of technical
and/or commercial literature
9. Engage in innovative developments to select
appropriate technologies and methodologies
to suit particular projects
10. Demonstrate the ability to apply practical and
rigorous approaches to identify projects,
develop engineering solutions and evaluate
their effectiveness
11. Demonstrate ability to provide technical and
commercial leadership through planning
industrial/research projects (budgets, people,
tasks) and contributing to teams delivering
under time pressures individually and as a
team member.
12. Propose and bring about improvements to
appropriate business standards

supervision. The students are given overall
responsibility for an industrially oriented
type project, usually for a sponsoring
company, working within tight timescales
and a fixed budget. The group project is
intended to develop time management,
team working and communication skills
both oral and written.
 The individual project is normally
industrially based. This is regarded as a
very important part of the course, and aims
to develop the ability to think and work in
an original way, contribute to knowledge
and overcome genuine problems in
manufacturing, industrial, business, or
commercial areas and communicate this
through a thesis.
Types of assessment
 Each module is assessed by exam or by
assignment appropriate to the nature of the
subject. Subjects that have a large theory
content are assessed by exam, and
assignments are used where practical
application is key to the development of
understanding in a subject (e.g. computer
based methodologies) or when knowledge
and understanding may be demonstrated
through discussion of a particular topic.
Application of the knowledge and its
understanding is also assessed through
the group project and thesis project
 The application of these skills is assessed
in exams and assignments and as part of
the group and thesis projects.
 Group projects are assessed by a
combination of work/meetings during the
project, oral presentations and written
reports. In all three, the performance of
each student of the group is assessed.
The ability to work in a team is assessed in
the group project. Assessment by the
project supervisor(s) is checked by peer
ranking within the teams. This project,
worth 40 credits and which the student
must successfully complete, is assessed
by Report (50%), Presentation (15%),
Poster (5%) and Individual contribution
(30%).
 The individual project is assessed by an
oral examination and a thesis, with a
contribution to the final mark coming from
the continual assessment of the student’s
work during the project by the
supervisor(s). This project, worth 80 credits
and which the student must successfully
complete, is assessed by a Thesis (90%)

and Oral exam (10%)

4. How is the course taught?
The MSc course has three components: taught modules (40%), group projects (20%), and an
individual research project (40%). The taught modules are typically delivered in one-week block
between October and February.
The teaching methods include lectures, case studies, group exercises, field visits, seminar and
computer-based demonstrations and exercises. All students attend a week of All students attend a
week of introductory lectures (given during the first week of the course). Within this induction week,
students will be introduced to personal development planning and asked to reflect on their
transferable skills and to take ownership of their personal development during the course. Induction
is followed by 8 weeks of assessed modules.
All MSc students undertake a Group Project (full time students) or produce a Dissertation (part time
students). The Group projects are group-based activities typically undertaken for 12 weeks between
February and April. The projects are designed to integrate knowledge, understanding and skills from
the taught modules in a real-life situation. The Group Project will typically involve a team of students
between 5 and 8, working to investigate a manufacturing opportunity or solve a manufacturing
problem. For part-time students, a Dissertation replaces the Group Project. The topic is to be agreed
between the University and the student.
All students will undertake a research projects (thesis project) under the supervision of a member of
academic staff. For the individual research project, each student is allocated a supervisor. Guidance
sessions are provided as to what is required from the thesis and oral presentation.

5. How are students assessed?
The course uses a range of assessment types. Students can expect to have four written
examinations, four pieces of assessment by submitted work, one piece of group project work
(including an assessment of personal contribution to group work), and one element assessed by a
thesis and an oral presentation. This approach has been adopted in order to perform formative and
summative assessments of the students to demonstrate their ability in a range of contexts. Part time
students will be assessed by dissertation in place of the group project.

6. How is the course structured?
Please see the course structure document for details on the individual elements of the course.
Full-time students register for the course in October and are expected to complete the course within
12 calendar months.
This course is also offered on a part-time basis. In such a situation, students typically complete the
various components of the course over two or three years. Typical case is to complete four taught
modules plus a Dissertation in year 1 and the remainder of the modules plus the Thesis in year two
and/or year 3.

7. What do students need to achieve in order to graduate?
Notwithstanding University Regulations and the authorities and powers exercised by examiners,
students will normally need to demonstrate achievement in the elements of the course, as laid out in
the course structure document. Courses are structured through the accumulation of credit, where 1
credit represents 10 notional learning hours.

In brief, however, students will normally need to achieve the following in order to be awarded the
qualifications:

A. Postgraduate Certificate
Students must successfully accumulate 60 credits through the assessment of taught modules, which
must include four compulsory modules (Operations Management; General Management;
Manufacturing Systems Engineering; Management of Technology and Innovation) and two optional
modules (taken from: Enterprise Systems; Operations Analysis; Supply Chain Management).
Students must pass all modules to qualify for the award.

B. Postgraduate Diploma
Students must successfully accumulate 80 credits as taught modules and 40 credits through group
projects or dissertation. Students must normally pass all elements of the course: condonement rules
within the School of Applied Sciences are outlined in the Course Manual.

C. Master of Science
Students must successfully accumulate 80 credits as taught modules, 40 credits through group
projects or dissertation, and 80 credits through an individual research project and oral presentation.
Students must normally pass all elements of the course; condonement rules within the School of
Applied Sciences are outlined in the Course Manual.
If a student does not meet the required standards for the award, the examiners for the programme
may decide to offer a lower award associated with the programme, providing that the student meets
the requirements of the lower award.

8. Does the course have any academic or industrial partners?
The course has an Industrial Advisory Panel that formally meets twice a year. The names and
affiliations of current members of the Industrial Advisory Panel can be found in the course manual.
Students can undertake their group and individual research project off campus. These projects have
been sponsored by large organisations such as Rolls-Royce, Airbus and Ford, as well as small and
medium companies, such as Peter’s Foods, Scapa, First Water and Fibercore.
The course benefits from links to a significant number of European universities through the European
Partnership Programme, as well as the strong rapport with a number of key clients abroad such as
Hindustan Aerospace Limited (HAL) and Saudi Industrial Development Fund (SIDF).
Students are involved with field trips off-campus as part of the study tour. In recent years these have
included the following organisations: Jaguar LandRover, Caterpillar, Rolls-Royce and JCB.

9. How will the University assure the quality of the provision?
The following mechanisms are used by the course team to review the provision of teaching and
learning and student satisfaction:
 External examiner - The course is reviewed by an External Examiner on an annual basis who
submits a formal report and participates in Exam Board meetings.
 The course is reviewed annually by the Industrial Advisory Panel
 Course delivery team, comprising the Course Director and Module Leaders meet formally
and informally to review the course






Student Feedback - A formal feedback session with students follows each module. This
feedback is received in a qualitative and quantitative format. Informal feedback is
encouraged throughout the duration of the course.
The Course is reviewed informally with industrial sponsors.
Professional bodies – The course is reviewed by Professional bodies, e.g. IET, IMechE and
RAeS.
Mechanism of feedback to students - Students currently receive formal feedback on all
assessments with the exception of the exams, and the individual research project and oral
presentation. Informal feedback on exams is available from module leaders on request. All
feedback and marks for each component of the course is scrutinised, and selected
assignments are double-marked. Informal feedback is provided throughout the duration of
the course and on special request.

10. What opportunities are graduates likely to have on completing the course?
The intention of the course is to provide students with knowledge and understanding and associated
transferrable skills to make a contribution to industry on graduation. Graduates will typically seek
employment in manufacturing industry, consultancies or research institutions. Common starting roles
are manufacturing engineer, industrial engineer, technical analyst, project manager and PhD
researcher. With time (quicker for those with more background experience) graduates progress to
senior positions with significant responsibility for people, budgets and projects.

COURSE STRUCTURE
Course information
Course title
Year
Awards and exit routes (options)
Mode of delivery
Faculty
School(s)
Course Director
Other useful contacts

Environment & Public Policy
2013/14
MSc, PGDip, PGCert
Full time and part time
Environment, Science and Manufacturing
Applied Sciences
Dr Anil Graves
Mr Tim Brewer (Programme Director)

Pass Criteria

MASTERS
Students must normally achieve a mark of 50% in each of the principal components of the course to pass. The principal components are (i) the
taught component; (ii) the group project (or dissertation for part time students); and (iii) the thesis. Students who pass the taught component
will progress to the group project.
The pass mark for each module within the taught component is also 50%.
Group/ Project (Dissertation for part time students) Component
Candidates must achieve at least 50% in this component to pass the MSc/MDes. Consideration of condonement will only be given if there are
mitigating circumstances accepted by the Mitigating Circumstances Panel and Exam Board.
Individual Project Component
Candidates must achieve at least 50% in this component to pass the MSc/MDes.
A candidate must achieve 50% or over in both of the assessments which make up the Individual Project Component. These assessments are a
written assessment in the form of a Thesis, and an oral assessment.
1

If a candidate achieves a mark of less than 50% in the written component (Thesis) of the individual project a decision will be made by the
examiners as to whether the Thesis is redeemable. If a Thesis is assessed as being redeemable then the opportunity to Revise and Represent
will be given. If a Thesis is viewed by the examiners to be irredeemable then the candidate will normally fail the Thesis component with no
opportunity to revise and represent.
A Thesis which is re-submitted following a Revise and Represent will have the mark capped at 50%.

PgDip
Students must normally achieve a mark of 50% in each of the principal components of the course to pass. The principal components are (i) the
taught component; and (ii) the group/design project (or dissertation for part time students). Students who pass the taught component will
progress to the group/design project.
The pass mark for each module within the taught component is also 50%.
Group/ Project (Dissertation for part time students) Component
Candidates must achieve at least 50% in this component to pass the PgDip. Consideration of condonement will only be given if there are
mitigating circumstances accepted by the Mitigating Circumstances Panel and Exam Board.

PgCert
Students must normally achieve an average mark of 50% to obtain a PgCert. The PgCert is achieved through passing 6 modules from the
taught programme.
The pass mark for each module within the taught component is 50%.

2

COURSE ELEMENTS LIBRARY (including taught modules, project modules and larger pieces of individual work)
Assessment

Contact hours

#

Title
1



Module Manager
Anil Graves

Start Date

NEW –
SHARED
WITH
OTHER
ENVIRO
COURSES

Induction (core,
not assessed)

2

I-EMBA1122

Principles of
sustainability
(core)

Paul Burgess

25

3

I-EEMA1185

Environmental
valuation (core)

James Morris

4

NEW

Environmental
advocacy &
discourse (core)

5

NEW

Environmental
horizon
scanning and
futures research
(core)

within

End Date
Type

Credits

Module
code

Weighting
module
(%)

10

ASSESSMENT
SUBMISSION
DATE
AND/OR
EXAM DATE

07/10/2013

11/10/2013

N/A

N/A

N/A

10

14/10/2013

18/10/2013

W

100

26/10/13

25

10

28/10/2013

01/11/2013

W

100

16/11/13

Anil Graves

25

10

11/11/2013

15/11/2013

W

100

23/11/13

Fiona Lickorish

15

10

18/11/2013

22/11/2013

W

100

07/12/13

0

Please note that all contact hours are indicative and represent scheduled teaching, which is subject to minor changes and variation at short notice.

3

6

I-EDIA1127

Evaluating
sustainability
(core)

Adrian Williams

25

10

09/12/2013

13/12/2013

W

100

21/12/13

7

I-EMBPDAI

Environmental
Policy and Risk
Governance
(Core)

Craig
Mauelshagen

25

10

13/01/2014

17/01/2014

W

100

25/01/14

Electives
8

I-EDIA1125

Environmental
regulation in
practice

George Prpich

25

10

27/01/2014

31/01/2014

W

100

08/02/2014

9

I-EMBA1128

Technology,
environment &
society

Phil Longhurst

25

10

27/01/2014

31/01/2014

W

100

08/02/2014

10

I-EEMA1520

Energy policy,
markets &
futures

James Morris

25

10

10/02/2014

14/02/2014

W

100

22/02/2014

11

I-EMBEMP

Environmental
management in
practice

Gill Drew

20

10

10/02/2014

14/02/2014

W+
O

90 + 10

22/02/2014

12

I-EPP-GP

Group project

Anil Graves

40

40

24/02/2014

09/05/2014

W+W

80 + 20

09/05/2014

Dissertation in
place of group
project for part
time students

Anil Graves

5

40

07/10/2013

30/09/2014

W

100

30/09/2014

Individual thesis
project

Individually
assigned

40

80

12/05/2014

12/09/2014

W+O

90+10

12/09/2014

13

14

I-EPPTHESIS

Please list all course elements that you consider to be the primary responsibility of another course (i.e. that this course/option borrows from or shares with another existing
course).
4

Module code

Module title
‘Induction module’, ‘Principles of sustainability’,
‘Environmental valuation’, ‘Evaluating sustainability’ and
‘Policy design, appraisal and implementation’
All elective modules

CROSS-MODULAR ASSESSMENT (including any assessment which rests outside an individual module)
#
1

Title
Assignment ‘Future policy design’

Modules Covered

Assessment

Modules 4 and 5

5

Type

Weight (%)

W

10

Course/programme that the module is borrowed from
Environment
Environment or Energy programmes

EXIT ROUTES <<Start with exit award comprising the highest credit value, separating out different options of the course>>

MSc
Description

COMPULSORY ELEMENTS
Induction Module
Core modules 2, 3, 6 & 7
Core modules 4 & 5
Group project
Individual thesis project
OPTIONAL ELEMENTS
Electives; 2 from
modules 8 to 11
TOTAL:

Credits
of set

Exam
weighting
of set
(%, 1dp)

Modular exam weighting (%,to 1dp if appropriate)

0
40
20
40
80

0
20
10
20
40

0
5% each
10%
20
40

20

10

5% each

200

100

100

Credits
of set

Exam
weighting
of set
(%, 1dp)

Modular exam weighting (%,to 1dp if appropriate)

0
40
20
40

0
34
17
33.3

0
8.5% each
17%
33.3%

20

17

8.5% each

120

100

100

Credits
of set

Exam
weighting
of set
(%, 1dp)

Modular exam weighting (%,to 1dp if appropriate)

0
40
20

0
66.8
33.4

0
16.7% each
16.7 each

60

100

100

PGDip
Description

COMPULSORY ELEMENTS
Induction Module
Core modules 2, 3, 6 & 7
Core modules 4 & 5
Group project
OPTIONAL ELEMENTS
Electives; 2 from
modules 8 to 11
TOTAL:

PG Cert
Description

COMPULSORY ELEMENTS
Induction Module
Core modules 2, 3, 6 & 7
Core modules 4 & 5
OPTIONAL ELEMENTS

TOTAL:

6

COURSE SUMMARY
Cranfield University: Course summaries
Course summaries (programme specifications) outline the content and structure of a course leading to an
award of Cranfield University. This version of the course summary has been approved by the relevant Faculty
of the University and every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information. Courses are under
constant review, however, and the University reserves the right, without notice, to withdraw, update or amend
this course summary at any time.

24th March 2012
28th May 2012

Date of publication
Last Reviewed

Environment & Public Policy
1. What is the course?
Course information
Course title
Awards and exit routes (options)
Mode of delivery
Faculty
School(s)
Course Tutor

Environment and Public Policy
MSc, PgDip, PgCert
Full time &/or part time
Environmental Science and Manufacturing
School of Applied Sciences
Dr Anil Graves

Awarding Body
Teaching Institution
Admissions body
Entry requirements
UK Qualifications Framework Level
Benchmark Statement(s)

Cranfield University
Cranfield University
Cranfield University
Standard University entry requirements
QAA FHEQ level 7 (Masters)
Not applicable

Institutions delivering the course
This course is delivered by the School of Applied Sciences, where the research interests include
technical policy development for environmental policy, environmental regulation, environmental risk
governance, evidenced-based policy support and environmental futures analysis. Teaching and/or
assessment is also provided by Professor Tim Allen of PRA Consultancy Services: Cranfield
University remains fully responsible for the quality of delivery of the course.

Accreditation
ESM will seek accreditation from the Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management
and IEMA at the next reaccreditation round for the Environment and Energy programmes.

2. What are the aims of Cranfield University in providing the course?
Cranfield University offers this course in order to:
COURSE SUMMARY

1



to prepare high quality, Cranfield-trained, policy specialists, literate in environmental
technology, management and engineering able to secure, in time, leading positions within
Government, think-tanks, and NGOs;



further strengthen the University’s relationship and support to policy advisors, high-end
lobbying organisations, NGO directors, regulatory affairs executives and influential
spokespeople on the environment agenda – as the provider of choice for robust scientific
evidence;



to provide a solid pipeline of candidates for a growing research and consulting portfolio in
environmental policy and regulation at Cranfield, as elsewhere.

Note: Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip) and Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert) exit routes are provided
for students who wish to access only parts of the course provided.
This programme is intended for the following range of students:


environmental scientists, technologists and engineers seeking roles requiring them to
provide well-founded evidence to environmental organisations operating in the political
arena;



environmental specialists seeking work in the civil service;



environmental scientists, technologists and engineers planning to undertake policy-focussed
research;



policy-focussed individuals seeking to move the environmental sector;



environmental scientists, technologists and engineers seeking an intensely applied
postgraduate experience and connections to the applied policy field.

COURSE SUMMARY

2

3. What should students expect to achieve in completing the course?
A. Postgraduate Certificate in Environment & Public Policy
In completing this course, and achieving the associated award, a diligent student should be able to:
[[Where teaching methods and/or types of assessment link directly to specific intended learning
outcomes, this should be indicated by their presentation as a number of separate rows.]]
Intended learning outcomes
Teaching methods
(skills and knowledge)
 Students will take the 6 core modules.
(i) Develop understanding of the key principles
 The successful student will have
of sustainability, ecosystem functions, and
successfully completed 60 credits from
environmental management.
taught modules. These are delivered via
(ii) critically appraise environmental policy
lectures, seminars and the student’s
options and the evidence that supports their
personal study. The classroom
development; identifying strengths and
experience is generally participative and
weaknesses of these accordingly;
discussion amongst the peer group is
(iii) construct an evidence-based argument for
encouraged. Personal development
the development of an environmental policy,
planning is introduced at the beginning of
its’ revision or promotion;
the course, and students are encouraged
(iv) differentiate between international, national
to reflect on their development through the
and local political contexts for environmental
course. Learning resources include
policy development, the distinct
lecture notes and presentations available
responsibilities of different tiers of
through the intranet, electronic and
Government with respect to policy design,
hardcopy library resources, and access to
and implementation arrangements;
academic staff
(v) distinguish between evidence and advocacy
Types of assessment
and produce well-honed arguments for
environmental policy outcomes that will have  Students will be assessed on their individual
traction among politicians, and senior
work to reinforce the emphasis placed on
executives;
the application of learning. A balance of
(vi) adopt a long-term, strategic perspective on
continuous assessment through a mix of
policy choice, understanding the role of
formative individual assignments (at
socio-political and socio-technical trends on
PGCert) will be designed to verify
environmental policy formulation and
knowledge, its analysis, synthesis and
regulation;
evaluation.
(vii) produce concise executive briefings and
syntheses of environmental policies, so to
inform corporate decisions, position
statements and policy briefings that have
impact;
(viii) outline key economic, technical and
policy/regulatory features and considerations
for the design, implementation and review of
environmental policies;
(ix) summarise processes for cost-benefit
appraisal, policy-level risk analysis and
regulatory impact assessment for
environmental policies.

COURSE SUMMARY

3

B. Postgraduate Diploma in Environment & Public Policy
In addition to the intended learning outcomes outlined above, a diligent student would also be
expected to achieve:
[[Where teaching methods and/or types of assessment link directly to specific intended learning
outcomes, this should be indicated by their presentation as a number of separate rows.]]
Intended learning outcomes
Teaching methods
(skills and knowledge)
a. Students will take the 6 core modules and
2 elective modules and participate in a
(i) Analyse environmental issues and contribute
to the policy decision making process in both
Group Project.
the private and public sector at all levels
b. In addition to the teaching methods
(ii) Integrate economic, political, and sociodescribed above, the group project for
technical understanding for effective
full-time students will be assessed by a
environmental policy development
combination of meetings during the
(iii) Develop problem definition, hypothesis
project, oral presentations and written
setting, analysis and problem solving skills to
report. The ability of each student of the
address challenges faced by environmental
group to perform work individually and as
policy sector.
part of a team will be assessed by the
(iv) Facilitate an integrative approach to problemproject supervisor(s). The dissertation for
solving; work as part of a team; argue
part-time students will be assessed on a
coherently; make effective decisions even
review of available information including
under time pressure; and show knowledge of
academic literature, presentation of ideas
personal strengths and weaknesses
and analysis and the development of
conclusions.
Types of assessment
c. Integrated and individual assignments over
the course of the taught programme.
d. A group project (PGDip) poster presentation
and final report allows the students to
demonstrate the application of knowledge
acquired in the taught modules.

COURSE SUMMARY

4

C. MSc in Environment & Public Policy
In addition to the intended learning outcomes outlined above, a diligent student would also be
expected to achieve:
[[Where teaching methods and/or types of assessment link directly to specific intended learning
outcomes, this should be indicated by their presentation as a number of separate rows.]]
Intended learning outcomes
Teaching methods
(skills and knowledge)
a. Students will take the 6 core modules and
(i)
Display evidence of independent learning
2 elective modules, a Group Project and
and originality in environmental policy
complete an individual thesis project.
development.
b. In addition to the teaching methods
(ii)
Demonstrate self-direction and originality in
outlined above, the research project
developing and delivering successful
supervision provides instruction in the
independent research projects relating to
design, execution, synthesis and
environmental policy.
communication of a well-honed, short(iii) Make informed judgements regarding
term research project written up in the
environmental policy on potentially
form of a research manuscript for the
incomplete data.
policy journals.
(iv) Demonstrate the ability to make effective
Types of assessment
oral and written presentations of their work
to both specialist and non-specialist
c. Integrated and individual assignments over
audiences.
the course of the taught programme.

d. A group project allows the students to
demonstrate the application of knowledge
acquired in the taught modules.
e. The research project (MSc is assessment by
thesis.

COURSE SUMMARY

5


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