Immigration waves .pdf


Nom original: Immigration-waves.pdf
Titre: Immigration waves
Auteur: Propriétaire

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The
immigrants
facts and
figures

1840-1860

1860-1880

1880-1900

1900-1920

1920-1960

1960-1985

Following many English
immigrants, the Irish came
to the U.S as a result of the
potato famine of 1845-49.
There was also a massive
German, Dutch and
Scandinavian wave of
immigration. The main
reasons for leaving the
country of origin were a
high rate of
unemployment, poverty
and hope for better wages.

The Chinese came to build
the railroads (trains linked
the two coasts of the US in
1869). They were so poor
in their own country that
they were unable to raise
their children. They
arrived in America full of
hopes and dreams.

Italians, Poles,and Czechs,
as well as laws from all
over Europe. Ukrainians,
Russians, Greeks also
came in large numbers
hoping to find religious
and political freedom and
an easier life.

These were the peak years
with many Italians and
Eastern Europeans who
continued to emigrate,
fleeing (running away
from) wars and revolutions
and hoping for a better
life.

1920-1940 :
The National Origins Act
of 1924 established quotas
for each country outside
the western hemisphere. It
was particularly prejudiced
against Eastern and
Southern Europeans.

Immigrants from the Third
World were allowed in
thanks to the Immigration
Act of 1965. Refugees
were admitted as
immigrants too.

The 1917 Immigration Act
excluded all Asians and
required literacy.

The Wall Street crash and
the Great Depression
brought immigration down
to its lowest level in 100
years.
This period marked the
start of the Mexican influx.
1940-1960 :
From the turn of the
century, most immigrants
and their children became
Americanized.
In 1948, the U.S began to
admit war refugees. From
1953 to 1955, 2,2 million
Mexicans were deported.

Today, poverty, war and
political persecution
remain the main reasons
for people leaving their
country and crossing the
border to the U.S


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