OS extracts english version .pdf



Nom original: OS extracts english version.pdf

Ce document au format PDF 1.4 a été généré par Scribus 1.4.3 / Scribus PDF Library 1.4.3, et a été envoyé sur fichier-pdf.fr le 13/11/2014 à 22:35, depuis l'adresse IP 84.99.x.x. La présente page de téléchargement du fichier a été vue 468 fois.
Taille du document: 58.3 Mo (29 pages).
Confidentialité: fichier public


Aperçu du document


[]
Collection

Stéréoscopique

XT R

AC

T

[]

TS

OBJECTIF
SOUND
Perrine Goyau
Photographe

F R O M J A M A I C A TO T H E U K

T

[4]
he sound systems evolved out of the needs of the music lovers of Kingston, Jamaica. They
could hear some of these records on the radio, the big stations in the southern States,
played all the hits and more!

T

A radio set though was not much use if you wanted to set up a dance or a session. You need
something with power. Commercial PA equipment was expensive and hard to get hold of in
Jamaica. The answer to this problem came with those Jamaicans who had served with the RAF in
England during WW2. You wanted an amp, they could build it for you.
The real problems started when the people who were buying these amps and speakers, aka sound
system, wanted the records that people loved to play on them!

AC

To keep a dance entertained for about six hours, took a lot of music. It wasn't long before people
like Coxsone Dodd started to go to America looking for rare tunes. And once they had they
wanted to make sure, that remained exclusive to them. So they removed the labels.
When the owners of these sound systems had a rare record, that other sounds wanted, sometimes
they would cut a 'dub', a copy of one of these R&B tunes. And until they had an even better tune
to entertain there own followers.

Sometime in the early sixties, the concept of the selector was born. These people knew what
records went with other records. Like a painter who knows how to blend colours. It sounds
simple, but it isn't !
Finally, the selector started to introduce the records - and read out announcements. " Just to let you
know that next week, the 1st ofMarch, the king ofsounds and blues will be in the Waterhouse area. "
Eventually that turned into deejaying, with people like Sir Lord Comic, Count Matchukie and
King Stitt.

XT R

By the time we get to the late sixties, 'specials' came on the scene. Often a vocalist or group would
go and recut a big hit in a different style for a sound system. It had nothing to do with
namechecking the sound, that came later. These specials were very special !
Then with the advancement of studio technology, the version appeared, engineers like Lynford
Anderson. It wasn't long after that the deejay records came onto the market. Which were also
called 'version'.
Finally, King Tubby who had been running his Home Town HiFi out of Waterhouse began his
early experiments into dub. By the time he changed his name of his sound to King Tubby, he
would be creating live dub on his sound system, using echo, delay and equalization. When these
ideas were taken back into the studio, it wasn't long after that the first dub albums appeared. All
these ideas came a simple desire to hear the music they love in a communal setting.
Socialism in music... Reggae music gwan!

Ray Hurford

TS

L

[5]
es sound systems sont nés des besoins des amateurs de musique, originaires de Kingston en
Jamaïque. Ces derniers pouvaient écouter certains de ces disques à la radio, les grosses
stations du sud des Etats-Unis jouaient tous les tubes et plus encore !

T

Un poste de radio n’avait pas grande utilité lorsque vous souhaitiez organiser un événement
autour du dancehall ou des sound systems. Il fallait quelque chose de puissant. Un équipement
commercial de type PA était cher et difficile à se procurer en Jamaïque. La réponse à ce problème
est venue avec les Jamaïcains qui avaient servi dans la RAF en Angleterre au cours de la seconde
guerre mondiale. Vous vouliez un ampli, ils pouvaient vous le construire.
Les vrais problèmes ont commencé lorsque les gens qui achetaient ces amplis et haut-parleurs, dits
sound system, ont voulu posséder les disques sur lesquels ils aimaient jouer !!!

AC

Garder une dancehall vivant, pendant près de six heures, nécessitait beaucoup de musique. Il ne
fallut pas longtemps avant que les gens comme Coxsone Dodd ne se rendent en Amérique afin d’y
dénicher des morceaux rares. Et une fois qu'ils les obtinrent, ils voulurent s’assurer d’en conserver
l’exclusivité. D’où la suppression des étiquettes sur les disques.
Lorsque les propriétaires de ces sound systems avaient un disque rare, que d'autres sounds
voulaient, ils en faisaient parfois un dub, une copie de l’un de ces morceaux R&B. Et ce jusqu'à
qu'ils en aient trouvé un meilleur pour divertir leur audience.
À une date indéterminée, dans les années soixante, le concept de selector est né. Cette personne
savait quels morceaux allaient avec quels autres. À la manière d’un peintre qui sait comment
assortir les couleurs. Cela paraît simple, mais cela ne l’est pas !
Finalement, le selector commençait à présenter les morceaux et à lire les annonces. " Juste vous
annoncer que la semaine prochaine, le 1er mars, le roi des sounds et du blues sera dans la région de
Waterhouse." Au final, cela s'est transformé en session de deejays avec des gens comme Sir Lord

Comic, Count Matchukie et King Stitt.

XT R

Au fur et à mesure que nous approchions de la fin des années soixante, les specials ont émergé sur
la scène. Souvent, un chanteur ou un groupe allait dénicher un super tube, dans un style musical
différent de celui du sound system. Cela n'avait rien à voir avec la personnification du morceau qui
viendrait plus tard. Ces specials étaient véritablement spéciales!
Puis, avec l'amélioration de la technologie des studios est apparue la version, portée par des
ingénieurs comme Lynford Anderson. Peu de temps après, les disques de deejays sont arrivés sur le
marché, lesquels ont été aussi appelés ' versions'.
Enfin, King Tubby, qui gérait son Home Town HiFi depuis Waterhouse, commença ses premières
expériences dans le dub. Tout en changeant le nom de son sound en King Tubby, il se mit à créer
du dub directement en sound system, utilisant les effets d'écho, de delay et des égaliseurs. Lorsque
ces idées furent reprises en studio, il ne fallut pas longtemps avant que les premiers albums de dub
n’apparaissent. Toutes ces idées ont été le fruit d’un simple désir d'écouter la musique que les gens
aimaient dans un cadre communautaire.
Le socialisme en musique... Reggae music gwan !

Ray Hurford

XT R
AC
T

TS
Wake the town and tell the people
about this musical disc coming your way  !
U Roy, Wake The Town, 1969

XT R
AC
T

TS

[9]
amaica, a small island in the Caribbean, is the birthplace of several musical genres,
some of which have come to play a major role in global musical culture. Dub, a kind
of Reggae with no voice track and the emphasis on a low accented bass supported by a
multitude of effects, transcends time and boundaries. Although its geographic expansion was
undoubtedly accompanied by changes in style, with a prominence, for instance, of roots dub
in Jamaica, stepper in England or electro sounds in France, Dub has maintained its live
concept and experimental spirit, becoming a symbol of free musical expression.

T

J

AC

The history of Jamaica is marked by colonisation and long years of slavery. Trying to forget the
dark past and the present misery, the sons of slaves kept a tradition of outdoor dancing parties [1].
The mid-1940s saw the birth of a cultural phenomenon which would in time revolutionize local
culture: Sound System, a mobile disco playing records through a speaker system. At first, the
venues (outdoor in a yard, in front of a bar, or later in dancehalls [2]) were a place for jamaican
people to let off steam to the sound of rhythm'n'blues and american jazz, but also of jamaican
mento and caribbean styles such as calypso. The nascent Jamaican music industry, with the first
local record labels [3], was to be be a key catalyst in shaping the new musical culture.

In the late 50s, the scene of the Sound Systems entered a new phase with the introduction of a
new generation of sound men [4] intent on upsetting Jamaican music. Many recording studios were
established during this period, introducing music business to the island. There remained a need to
create some truly local music, a music belonging to the people and integrating the multiple
influences etched by history.

XT R

Some two years before it acquired its Independence, Jamaica witnessed the birth of Ska music, a
sort of inverted Rhythm'n'Blues where the backbeat is increased so as to become the highlight of
the rhythm[5]. Around 1966 ska made way to Rocksteady, a kind of local soul with a sowed-down
ska backbeat. That same year, in July, the emperor of Ethiopia, Haile Selassie 1st, came to the
island on an official visit to the cheers of the crowd. He is considered by members of the Rastafari
faith [6] as the incarnation of Jah (God). Since many players on the music scene were members or
supporters of the Rastafari movement, this event is crucial in Jamaican music history ; there is no
doubt that the spread of the Rasta message contributed greatly to the development and recognition
of yardie music [7]. In 1968, a new, faster and much freeer style emerged: Reggae. Bass and drum
were the cornerstone of the new rhythm. Jamaican music had given birth to one of the most
prolific of protest genres of the twentieth century.
The discovery and recognition of a new style usually comes about during dance events, so did
Dub... Let's go back to these popular evenings. The essence of Sound System lies in its proximity
to the public, and this is what makes the identity of Jamaican music. The singer and producer
Derrick Harriott remembers: "What has been critical, beyond merely listening to music, is that
you could physically feel the vibrations, due to the output of the equipment. While dancing, we
could really feel we were part of it. "8 Yet, to have the public react, playing the right tunes was not
sufficient. Besides the selector/operator, a Deejay9 , in charge of announcing the plates, had to
warm up the crowd and “lively up” the dance. DJ's have been present since the onset of Sound
System, but they came to the foreground with the legendary “Daddy” U-Roy. When in 1968
Osbourne Ruddock, a.k.a. King Tubby, launched his own Sound System, U-Roy became his
number one deejay. Tubby, through his technical position at Treasure Isle studio (Duke Reid's)
could make singles for personal use, known as “specials”, on which U-Roy put his voice afterwards
in the empty spaces provided for this purpose. A dubplate10 of the Paragon's On The Beach is
considered as the first of instrumental versions, from which which Dub evolved. Provided by...

XT R
AC
T

TS

Aba Shanti I
Bush Chemist
Channel One
Chazbo
Dubkasm
Gussie P
Idren Natural
Jah Voice
Jah Youth
Kibir Ma Amlak
King Earthquake
Mad Professor
Nick Manasseh
Noel Zebulon
Ras Terry Gad
Roots Hitek
Russ Disciples
Tena Stelin
Twinkle Brothers
Vibronics
Young Warrior
Zion train

Aba Shanti I
Bush Chemist
Channel One
Chazbo
Dubkasm
Gussie P
Idren Natural
Jah Voice
Jah Youth
Kibir La Amlak
King Earthquake
Mad Professor
Nick Manasseh
Noel Zebulon
Ras Terry Gad
Roots Hitek
Russ Disciples
Tena Stelin
Twinkle Brothers
Vibronics
Young Warrior
Zion train

XT R
AC
T

[ 14 ]

XT R

AC

T

[]

TS

Aba Shanti I

[ 16 ]

ABA
SHANTI
I
Operator - Deejay - Singer

T

Falasha Recording

H

AC

aile Selassie's words inspire me to do what I do. My father had a sound system
and we grew up with music at home. We used to listen to everything from calypso,
ska to soul music, which have all shaped our culture. I have also worked as an MC
for Jah Tubbys for several years, which has helped me to strengthen my rasta faith.
Sound systems have emerged in England because of racism and prejudice towards black
people. We were part of this population and decided to go back home in order to find new
productions. We then created, my brother Blood Shanti and I, our sound system in 1995.
Back in England, we went in search of all means we would need and all the places
where we could play : in churches, clubs and elsewhere. I remember those nights
which could last from 7 pm to 11 am. All of this, for 50 pens! The film Babylon
shows very well how we would live in the 80s.

XT R

We would discuss and think about the message, and about the future Jah Shaka
was embodying at that time. The music was still important, but it is mostly the
message that we were made to hear that led us to commit ourselves. It was a new
way of listening and thinking.
We were creating music for all, for all the children of Jah who wanted to hear.
Foundations and roots carried the true message.
I do not think much about dubstep or drum'n'bass, I just find that this music
loses some very important part of reggae, which are the words, the lyrics, the
message it contains.

My best memory of sessions, if I had to choose one, dates back in 2005 during
Jahsound Festival. There was music all day and all night! Without any
interruption! It looked like a real cohesion, a symbiosis, expressed by a same and
powerful voice.

ABA
SHANTI
I
Operateur - Deejay - Chanteur
Falasha Recording

T

TS

[ 17 ]

es mots de Hailé Sélassié m'inspirent à faire ce que je fais. Mon père avait un
sound system et nous avons grandi avec la musique à la maison. On écoutait de tout
: du calypso, du ska, de la soul et tout ce qui a fait notre culture. J'ai aussi été le MC
de Jah Tubbys pendant plusieurs années. Ce qui m'a aidé à renforcer ma foi rasta.

L

AC

Les sounds systems sont apparus en Angleterre à cause du racisme et des préjugés à
l’encontre du peuple noir. Nous en faisions partie et nous avons décidé pour commencer de
retourner chez nous chercher de nouvelles productions. Nous avons ensuite créé, mon frère
Blood Shanti et moi, notre sound system en 1995.
De retour en Angleterre, nous avons cherché tous les moyens et endroits pour jouer, dans
les églises, les clubs et d’autres. Je me souviens de ces soirées
à l'époque qui pouvaient durer de 19h à 11h le lendemain
matin, tout ça pour 50 pens! Le film Babylon montre bien
comment nous vivions dans les années 80.

XT R

Nous discutions et réfléchissions au message et à l'avenir
que Jah Shaka portait à ce moment-là. La musique était
certes importante, mais c'est surtout le message qui nous
était alors permis d'entendre qui nous a convaincus de nous
engager. C'était une nouvelle façon d'écouter et de penser.
Nous créions la musique pour tout le monde, pour tous les
enfants de Jah qui voulaient l'entendre. Les fondations, les
roots portent le vrai message.
Je ne pense pas grand-chose du dubstep ou du drum'n'bass,
je trouve juste que cette musique perd une partie très
importante du reggae que sont les mots, les paroles et le
message.
Mon meilleur souvenir de sessions, s’il fallait en choisir un,
serait en 2005 au Jahsound Festival. Il y avait de la musique
nuit et jour! Sans interruption! C’est comme s'il y avait une
vraie cohésion, une symbiose, une même et puissante voix.

[ 19 ]

PORTFOLIO

XT R
AC
T

XT R
AC
T

TS

[ 22 ]

CREDITS
All photos by Perrine Goyau.

T

Julien Zasso wrote the introductory text, remixed and expanded by Grégory Hautbois with him
agreement.
The birth of the jamaican discography industry text wrote by Grégory Hautbois
English and french translation by Jorge Irrie.

AC

All interviews by Perrine Goyau French, except that of Jah Voice, interview by JB Dub Livity.
Reproduced here with his permission, he must be recognized.

XT R

The design and layout have been entrusted to Grégory Hautbois.

TS

[ 23 ]

CREDITS

Toutes les photos sont l'oeuvre de Perrine Goyau.

T

Julien Zasso est l'auteur du texte d'introduction, remixé et enrichi avec son accord par Grégory
Hautbois.
Jorge Irrie s'est chargé de la traduction anglaise et française.

Tous les entretiens ont été menés et transcrits en français par Perrine Goyau, à l'exception de celui de Jah
Voice par JB de Dub Livity. Reproduit ici avec son autorisation, qu'il en soit remercié.

XT R

AC

La conception et la mise en page ont été confiée à Grégory Hautbois.

Egalement aux Editions Afromundi
HISTOIRE DES INDEPENDANCES AFRICAINES
et de ceux qui les ont faites
Jordane Bertrand

LA MAUVAISE EDUCATION DU NÈGRE
Carter G. Woodson

MÉTIS, MÉTISSE, MÉTISSAGE
de quoi parle-t-on ?
Anaïs Favre

UN NOIR EN COLÈRE
Serg Mokanda

L'ECOLE DE LA PATIENCE
ma Route du Rhum.
Willy Bissainte

CAPOEIRA ANGOLA
Maître Pastinha

LE NÈGRE AU CHAPEAU
l'ascension et la chute de Marcus Garvey
Colin Grant

OBJECTIF SOUND - From Jamaica to The UK
ISBN : 978-2-919215-089
Afromundi, 2014
www.afromundi.com




Télécharger le fichier (PDF)

OS extracts english version.pdf (PDF, 58.3 Mo)

Télécharger
Formats alternatifs: ZIP







Documents similaires


os extracts english version
interview krasseville 01 2016 iron folks ok
script talents
eeg
expression ecrite the man with the cello
w r english

Sur le même sujet..