Liberty and Licence CFP 1(1) .pdf


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University of Sousse

Faculty of Arts and
Humanities
Department of English

Liberty and Licence
International Interdisciplinary Conference
7-8-9 April 2016

Call for Papers

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According to the Collins English Dictionary, licence, or (US) license, can be defined on the one
hand as “official permission to do something” and “formal permission,” and on the other hand
as “liberty of action or thought,” “excessive freedom” and “licentiousness.” Licence can,
therefore, both restrict and liberate. These two contrasting definitions frame many debates
and dialogues in literature, culture studies, and linguistics.
The individuals or groups who wish to set rules and establish an environment in which
permission is required—whether at local, national, regional or global levels—often collide with
those who wish to break free of rules and regulations, who believe that liberty and freedom of
action and thought are their rights. However, freedom for one group may not produce
freedom for all; it may even be a cause of oppression and a restriction of liberty for others, just
as regulation for some may cause liberty for others. Moreover, among the advocates of
regulation, discussion over who should have the prerogative to set restrictions and grant
authorizations has become increasingly vociferous, with established Western powers and
assumptions being increasingly challenged by both new powers in the East and radical
movements in the West.
Artistic creation seems to have, over the ages, dwelt upon and developed within and
across the interface of the paradoxical conceptions of liberty and licence. How innovative or
conventional is the artist? Can art exceed Nature, the model? From imitating reality and nature
in a lifelike manner to de-legitimizing the presence of a copy, Art has gone a long way in
revolutionizing its own praxis. In this respect, the conference will address, among other issues,
the canonical, the nonconventional, the inter-generic, the hybrid, the iconoclastic, the
politically “correct,” the politically committed, the ethical, borderline experience, historicity,
textuality, “trace,” “erasure,” representation and misrepresentation, mainstream culture, and
subculture.
Is freedom of choice a reality or a myth? Or is there some sort of pressure which
constrains social, political and linguistic alternatives? Some would argue that the individual’s
discursive practices are often influenced by peer pressure, and that the liberties and licences
attributed to the members of a particular community are generally reflected in the choices
that they make and in the roles that they opt for within their group, as they attempt to comply
with rules and conform to social/cultural norms. These norms are said to be set to “regulate”
individuals’ practices in a variety of domains, including language use, language learning,
language acquisition, and teaching.

The steering committee welcomes panel/paper proposals from a wide array of disciplines,
including:
Anthropology — Art History — Comparative Literature — Culture Studies — Gender Studies —
History — Linguistics — Literary Theories — Pedagogy — Philosophy — Political Science —
Religious Studies — Translation

Possible topics include but are not limited to:




















Liberty and licence: visions and revisions
Artistic licence, avant-gardism, experimental literature
Decency, value, censorship, the literary rake
Literary genres and theories
Temperance, transgression, casuistry
Authority, authorisation, power, (de-) legitimisation
Human rights and freedoms
Globalisation, free exchange, protectionism, trade barriers
Economic freedom and the protection of the environment
Legal/illegal immigration: national failure, global responsibility
International law, national sovereignty, deconfliction and the ‘right’ of interference
Mediating the ethics and freedom of writing in social networks
Social media: hyper-liberty, cybercrime
Individual and social boundaries in language use
Acceptable vs. unacceptable language varieties
Necessity, liberty and discursive formations
Controversial ‘liberty’ in translation
Academic liberties and the ethics of research
Liberty and discipline, ethics and licence

The deadline for submissions is 1 January 2016. Abstracts of up to 300 words should be sent as
anonymised e-mail attachments, along with a separate biography of up to 200 words, to
<libertylicencesousse@gmail.com>. Papers should be no more than 20 minutes in length, and
should be presented in English. Because up to 30 minutes per panel will be devoted to discussion,
the number of selected papers will be limited. Researchers submitting abstracts are encouraged
to raise questions that engage with the current debates on ‘liberty’ and ‘licence,’ and to come up
with new perspectives that can enhance our understanding of their complex relationship.
Participants will be notified whether their abstracts have been accepted by 14 January 2016.

Scientific Committee:
Pr. Nessima Tarchouna – Pr. Mansour Khelifa – Pr. Edward Sklepowich – Pr. Mounir Triki –
Pr. Akila Sallami Baklouti – Pr. Mounir Guirat – Pr. Moncef Ben Abdeljelil – Dr. Mohamed Salah
Harzallah


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