Fichier PDF

Partage, hébergement, conversion et archivage facile de documents au format PDF

Partager un fichier Mes fichiers Convertir un fichier Boite à outils Recherche Aide Contact



lecture notes MdC2014 .pdf



Nom original: lecture_notes_MdC2014.pdf
Titre: Microsoft PowerPoint - MdC2014.pptx
Auteur: Administrator

Ce document au format PDF 1.4 a été généré par PScript5.dll Version 5.2.2 / Acrobat Distiller 7.0.5 (Windows), et a été envoyé sur fichier-pdf.fr le 03/03/2016 à 21:00, depuis l'adresse IP 46.193.x.x. La présente page de téléchargement du fichier a été vue 394 fois.
Taille du document: 3.4 Mo (31 pages).
Confidentialité: fichier public




Télécharger le fichier (PDF)









Aperçu du document


COMPOSITE MATERIALS. APPLICATION
introduction

Mechanics of Composite Materials

T h l
Technology of Polymers and Composites & Engineering Mechanics
fP l
dC
i &E i
i M h i

Dmytro Vasiukov
Dmytro 
y Vasiukov
dmytro.vasiukov@mines‐‐douai.fr
dmytro.vasiukov@mines
2

COMPOSITE MATERIALS

COMPOSITE MATERIALS
Some videos: 
A380 production
BMW i3 production
BMW i3 crash test
http://leehamnews.com/category/american‐airlines



3



http://www.boeing.com

4



http://www.compositesworld.com/

BMW i3 car body

COMPOSITE MATERIALS. APPLICATION

COMPOSITE MATERIALS

introduction
Aerospace
CFRP

introduction
Composite material= combination of two or more materials with significantly different 
behavior on a macroscopic scale i e a material with two or more distinct phases namely
behavior on a macroscopic scale, i.e. a material with two or more distinct phases, namely 
the reinforcements and matrices Not like an alloy, like e.g. Ti6AlV4, or Al 7050!

Wing Skin, Front Fuselage, Control Surface Fin & Rudder, Access Doors, Under Carriage Doors, Engine Cowlings,
M i Torsion
Main
T i Box,
B
F l Tanks,
Fuel
T k Rotor
R t Blades,
Bl d Fuselage
F l
St t
Structures
and
d Floor
Fl
B d off Helicopters,
Boards
H li t
A t
Antenna
Dishes, Solar Booms and Solar Arrays, etc.

BFRP

Horizontal and Vertical Tail, Stiffening Spars, Ribs and Longerons, etc.

KFRP

Nose Cones, Wing Root, Fairings, Cockpit and Fuselage of Helicopters, Motor Casings, Pressure Bottles, Propellant

Reinforcements can be: particulates (e.g. SiC), whiskers or fibers, embedded in continuous 
phases („matrices“), here: restriction to composites with long fibers („advanced“ 
composites), often abbreviated as FRP (fiber reinforced plastics)
Fiber, monofilament: Primary reinforcement, short (= staple) or long (= continuous), fiber 
„size“  Ø =7 ...150 μ
i “ Ø 7 150

Tanks, Other Pressurised Systems, etc.
GFRP
Structural
GFRP

Floor Boards, Interior Decorative Panels, Partitions, Cabin Baggage Racks and Several Similar Applications.
Folded Plates of Various Forms, Both Synclastic and Anticlastic Shells, Skeletal Structures, Walls and Panels,

Matrices: polymers, metals or ceramics; we shall consider  polymeric matrices

Doors, Windows, Ladders, Staircases, Chemical and Water Tanks, Cooling Towers, Bridge Decks, Antenna Dishes,
etc.
etc

In general, the reinforcements are much stronger and stiffer than the matrix and matrices 
are more ductile than fibers

Marine and Mechanical
GFRP
Ship and Boat Hulls, Masts, Automobile Bodies, Frames and Bumpers, Bodies of Railway Bogeys, Drive shafts,
g Rods,, Suspension
p
Systems,
y
, Instrument Panels.
Connecting
Sports
GFRP/CFRP

Lamina ply laminae: unidirectional (UD) layer is basic element thicknesses (in mm) 0 125
Lamina, ply, laminae: unidirectional (UD) layer, is basic element, thicknesses (in mm) 0.125 
(E‐Glass), 0.13 (Kevlar, HR carbon)

Skis, Ski Poles, Fishing Rods, Golf Clubs, Tennis and Badminton Rackets, Hockey Sticks, Poles(Pole vault),
Bicycle Frames, etc.

Laminate: a stack of two or more UD‐laminae with equal or different orientations 
Laminate: a stack of two or more
with equal or different orientations
(„multiaxial“), defined by a stacking sequence
5

6

COMPOSITE MATERIALS

COMPOSITE MATERIALS
introduction

7

introduction

8

COMPOSITE MATERIALS

COMPOSITE MATERIALS
introduction

introduction
Advantages 2:

Advantages 1:
9Superb mechanical properties from high specific strength and high specific stiffness
9Superb mechanical properties from high specific strength and high specific stiffness, 
(vehicles, sports goods, lightweight structures like satellites etc). 

9Electrical conductivity: can vary from very low to intermediate levels, by control of fibers 
and fillers. New: usage of C‐fibers as very long strain gauges 

g
, g
p
p
gp
9Cost savings for fuel in vehicles, higher production speed for tools or rotating parts

9Non‐magnetic: useful as material for mine sweeper hulls, compass casings...

9Composites are „functional materials“, i.e. their anisotropy can be used for the tailoring of 
p p
p
(
)
different properties, like the stiffness, or the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE)

9Energy absorption: generally not as good as ductile metals, but good with special design 
for crash absorbing under floor structures in helicopters, aircraft, cars

9Good corrosion resistance compared to metals, usage for tanks and storage containers, 
valves, pipework, marine structures etc. (but not for Carbon/ Aluminium)

9Transparency to radiations, like x‐rays, radio waves. Application: radomes in A/C

9Fatigue: excellent compared to most metals, good damage tolerance, fewer inspections 
required, benign failure modes

9Complex shapes: easier to fabricate than with sheet metals, applications: airframes for 
helicopters, stealthy aircraft etc.

9Short‐run compatibility: composites can be produced for small quantity with cheaper 
tooling than metals

9Dimensional stability: zero CTE design is possible, required for optical benches, precision 
camera casings, satellite panels etc.
9Thermal conductivity: is very low through the thickness, can be high in fiber direction

9

10

COMPOSITE MATERIALS

MECHANICS OF COMPOSITES
introduction

overview

Disadvantages:

Composite material = heterogeneous and anisotropic materials

9Poor mechanical properties transverse to the fibers
Complex failure behavior
failure behavior of laminates
of laminates
9Complex
9Design process much more complex than with metals
9Repair methods more difficult/ or expensive
9Expensive materials and high production tools cost

Optical microscopy picture of CFRP
Optical microscopy picture of CFRP 
plate with layup [0/90/0/90/0] 

9Not very often economic necessity to apply composites, esp. in mechanical industry
9Lacking know‐how especially in the (mechanical) industry

• Macroscopic properties depend on the 
microstructure
• Non‐uniform stress distribution

9Sustainability: energy‐intensive materials production and curing, problematic recycling of 
thermoset matrices 
h
i
11

12

MECHANICS OF COMPOSITES

DIFFERENT PROBLEMS AND APPLICATION
overview

Statement:

introduction

Geometry

MICRO 
((constituents))

MACRO 
((laminate))

MESO (ply)
MESO (ply)

What is distribution of stress?
What is the maximum value for stress?
What is the maximum value for stress?
Material
Constitutive behavior
[σ]

[ε]

How the structure 
will be deformed?

13

matrix

Strength
Given: dimension of  structure
Given:
dimension of structure
Find: what is maximum force?
or inverse
Gi
Given: forces
f
Find:  what are dimensions?

Determine the constitutive behavior and strength properties to 
calculate the structure response

fiber
d=3‐200 m ‐6

Basic components
Basic components

Material properties, voids, 
distribution
14

MECHANICS OF COMPOSITES

MICROMECHANICS

h=0,1mm
Heterogeneous 
Heterogeneous
continuum

Homogeneous, anisotropic 
Homogeneous
anisotropic
continuum

Elastic and strength 
properties of ply

Constitutive behavior

Ply theory

COMPOSITE LAMINATE 
THEORY

MECHANICS OF COMPOSITES
objectives

course content
course content

You will learn HOW TO:
1 Reminding of continuum mechanics
1.
Reminding of continuum mechanics
1. determine the  mechanical properties of an 
unidirectional  composite (elastic moduli, strength) as 
function of mechanical properties of its constituents 
(fiber, matrix)

2. Calculation of unidirectional composites (simple ply)
2 1 Mi
2.1 Micromechanical analysis and calculation of elastic properties
h i l
l i
d l l ti
f l ti
ti
2.2 Micromechanical analysis and fracture properties calculation
2.3 Macroscopic analysis and definition of elastic properties
2.4 Fracture criteria

2. define a constitutive behavior an unidirectional ply

3. Laminate  composite
3.1 Design 
3.2 Composite Laminate Theory
y
3.3 Fracture analysis

3 use different failure criteria
3.
use different failure criteria
4. apply the composite laminate theory
5. identify specific mechanical properties of composite 
depending on its stacking
15

4. Particular problems: thick composites and hydrothermal analysis

16

CONTINUUM MECHANICS

CONTINUUM MECHANICS
reminder

reminder

Mechanical behavior of composite is based on the Continuum mechanics theory 
which describes the behavior of the homogeneous linear elastic anisotropic (in
which describes the behavior of the homogeneous, linear elastic, anisotropic (in 
general case)

Simple stress states

Homogeneous : It means, that material properties is identical in any considered 
H
It
th t
t i l
ti i id ti l i
id d
point of the body.

‰ normal stress state tension and compression for which the loading is applied 
normal stress state tension and compression for which the loading is applied
perpendicular to surface of the element

Linear elastic: The relation between strains and stresses is described by linear 
function.

‰ pure shear loading when shear loading is applied in‐plane of the element  
h
l di
h
h
l di i
li d i l
f th l
t

There exist simple stress states

F
F

Material symmetries: anisotropic, orthotropic, transversal isotropic and isotropic
tension 

Material is isotropic
p if material properties in all directions are identical. As 
p p
opposite case to isotropic is anisotropic body.

17

If material has 3 plane of symmetry (perpendicular to the principle axes of
If material has 3 plane of symmetry (perpendicular to the principle axes of 
material), in this case it is called orthotropic. The  elastic properties are identical 
on both sides of each of the planes of symmetry.

compression 

S

Complex stress state
Complex stress state is a combination of simple ones (traction‐traction,
Complex stress state is a combination of simple ones (traction
traction, simple 
simple
bending, complex bending, etc.).
18

CONTINUUM MECHANICS

CONTINUUM MECHANICS
reminder

Deformations and stresses: external forces applied on body generate stresses and 
deformations
deformations 
Shear stress:  τ= T/A0
Normal stress: σ= F/A0
Deformation normal longitudinal: 
εL= (L‐L0)/L0 = ΔL/L0
Deformation normal transversal: 
εT= (D‐D
(D D0)/D0 = ΔD/D
ΔD/D0

19

Shear deformations:
γ = ΔV/L0

reminder
Mathematical preliminaries:  Vector definitions (*) 

Summation rule, products (*) 

3D stress state(*)
In general case of the classical material behavior the stress state is characterized by the 
stress tensor.
stress tensor. 
From mathematical point of view a second rank tensor. 
Assuming orthonormal coordinate system:  Cartesian coordinates xi with unit vectors ei which 
g
have to fulfill the following conditions: 

σ = σij eˆ i eˆ j

20

eˆ i = 1

eˆ i ⋅ eˆ j = δij

CONTINUUM MECHANICS

CONTINUUM MECHANICS
reminder

⎡ σ11 σ12

σ ( M ) = ⎢σ 21 σ 22
⎢⎣ σ31 σ32

3D stress state

σ13 ⎤
σ 23 ⎥⎥
σ33 ⎥⎦

reminder
Plane stress state
If thickness of a structure is small compared to other dimensions (plates thin
If thickness of a structure is small compared to other dimensions (plates, thin 
shells), the normal stresses are neglected in terms (σ33  = 0, σ13 = 0, σ23 = 0). 
So, it is considered that the structure is in a plane stress state.

with σij = σji

[σi ] = [σ2 , σ3 , σ4 ]T

[σi ] = [σ1 , σ 2 , σ6 ]T

As for stress tensor can be represented in the vector form (also called as Kelvin‐
Voigt notation). 

21

11

22

33

23,32

13,31

12,21

1

2

3

4

5

6

⎡ σ11 ⎤ ⎡ σ1 ⎤ ⎡ σ11 ⎤ ⎡ σ1 ⎤
⎢σ ⎥ ⎢σ ⎥ ⎢σ ⎥ ⎢σ ⎥
⎢ 22 ⎥ ⎢ 2 ⎥ ⎢ 22 ⎥ ⎢ 2 ⎥
σ
σ
σ
σ
[σi ] = ⎢⎢ 33 ⎥⎥ = ⎢⎢ 3 ⎥⎥ = ⎢⎢ 33 ⎥⎥ = ⎢⎢ 3 ⎥⎥
σ4
τ
σ 23
τ 23
⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ 4⎥
⎢ σ13 ⎥ ⎢σ 5 ⎥ ⎢ τ13 ⎥ ⎢ τ5 ⎥
⎢⎣ σ12 ⎦⎥ ⎢⎣σ 6 ⎥⎦ ⎢⎣ τ12 ⎥⎦ ⎣⎢ τ6 ⎥⎦

22

CONTINUUM MECHANICS

CONTINUUM MECHANICS
reminder

reminder
Reciprocally,

Mathematical preliminaries:  transformation rules (*) 

T
Transformation rules for stress tensor by rotation about axis on angle θ.
f
ti
l f t
t
b
t ti
b t i
l θ

[σ i ](1, 2,3) = [Tσ ][σ i ]( x , y , z )
Stress tensor in 
rotated coordinate 
system (1,2,3)

23

2
s2
⎡ σ1 ⎤ ⎡ c
⎢σ ⎥ ⎢ 2
c2
⎢ 2⎥ ⎢ s
⎢ σ3 ⎥ ⎢ 0
0
⎢ ⎥=⎢
σ
0
0
⎢ 4⎥ ⎢

⎢ σ5 ⎥
0
0
⎢ ⎥ ⎢
⎣ σ6 ⎦ ⎣⎢ − sc sc

transformation 
matrix

0 0
0 0
1 0
0 c
0 s
0 0

[Tσ]‐11 inverse of the transformation matrix [T
inverse of the transformation matrix [Tσ] , obtained by replacing 
] obtained by replacing θ by ‐
by θ, 
then transformation matrix for rotation of ‐θ written as: 

Stress tensor in 
reference coordinate 
reference
coordinate
system (x,y,z)

2 sc ⎤ ⎡ σ xx ⎤
⎥ ⎢ ⎥
0
−2 sc ⎥ ⎢ σ yy ⎥
0
0 ⎥ ⎢ σ zz ⎥
⎥ ⎢ ⎥
0 ⎥ ⎢ σ yz ⎥
−s
c
0 ⎥⎥ ⎢ σ xz ⎥
⎢ ⎥ c = cosθ
0 c 2 − s 2 ⎦⎥ ⎣⎢ σ xy ⎦⎥ s = sin θ

[σ i ]( x, y , z ) = [Tσ ]−1 [σ i ](1, 2,3)

0

24

⎡c 2 s 2
⎢ 2
c2
⎢s
⎢0
0
[Tσ ]−1 = ⎢
0
⎢0
⎢0
0

⎢⎣ sc − sc

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

c

s

0 −s c
0

0

0

−2 sc ⎤

2 sc ⎥
0 ⎥

0 ⎥
0 ⎥⎥
c 2 − s 2 ⎥⎦

c = cosθ
s = sin θ

CONTINUUM MECHANICS

CONTINUUM MECHANICS
reminder

Displacement of a point

reminder
Deformation theory(*)

Initial state (or reference configuration) 
before application of external forces

Final state (current configuration) 
after application of external forces

3

Components of the strain tensor defined as:

1 ⎛ ∂u ∂u ∂u ∂u ⎞
εij = ⎜ i + j + k k ⎟
2 ⎝ ∂x j ∂xi ∂xi ∂x j ⎠

3
M

M
O

O

2

2

deformation 
of the body

1

M’

It will be used the assumption of the small deformations, the second derivatives 
are infinitively small compare to first order and can be neglected, so the 
deformations are rewritten as follows:

[F]

1

1 ⎛ ∂u ∂u ⎞
εij = ⎜ i + j ⎟
2 ⎝ ∂x j ∂xi ⎠

During deformation of the solid body subjected to external forces, the point M
displaces to M’, the vector MM’ corresponds to the displacement of that point 

u ( M ) = MM ' = ui ei
25

26

CONTINUUM MECHANICS

CONTINUUM MECHANICS
reminder

reminder

Strain (or deformation) tensor ε(M) is second rank 
symmetric tensor:
symmetric tensor:
⎡ ε11 2ε12 2ε13 ⎤
ε ( M ) = ⎢⎢ 2ε 21 ε 22 2ε 23 ⎥⎥ =
⎣⎢ 2ε31 2ε32 ε33 ⎦⎥

⎡ ε11

= ⎢ 2ε12
⎣⎢ 2ε13

27

2ε12
ε 22
2ε 23

2ε13 ⎤ ⎡ ε11
2ε 23 ⎥⎥ = ⎢⎢ γ12
ε33 ⎦⎥ ⎣⎢ γ13

⎡ ε1 ⎤ ⎡ ε11 ⎤ ⎡ ε11 ⎤
⎢ ⎥ ⎢
⎥ ⎢ ⎥
⎢ ε 2 ⎥ ⎢ ε 22 ⎥ ⎢ ε 22 ⎥
⎢ ε3 ⎥ ⎢ ε33 ⎥ ⎢ ε33 ⎥
⎢ ⎥=⎢
⎥=⎢ ⎥
⎢ ε 4 ⎥ ⎢ 2ε 23 ⎥ ⎢ γ 23 ⎥
⎢ ε5 ⎥ ⎢ 2ε13 ⎥ ⎢ γ13 ⎥
⎢ ⎥ ⎢
⎥ ⎢ ⎥
⎢⎣ ε6 ⎥⎦ ⎢⎣ 2ε12 ⎥⎦ ⎢⎣ γ12 ⎥⎦

γ12

Transformation rules: changing of the coordinates system by rotating around axis
⎡ ε xx ⎤
⎡ ε xx ⎤
⎡ ε1 ⎤
⎢ε ⎥
⎢ε ⎥
⎢ε ⎥
⎢ yy ⎥
⎢ yy ⎥
⎢ 2⎥
⎢ ε zz ⎥
⎢ ε3 ⎥
-1 ⎢ ε zz ⎥
⎢ ⎥ = [Tε ] ⎢ ⎥ = [ R ][Tσ ][ R ] ⎢ ⎥
⎢ γ yz ⎥
⎢ γ yz ⎥
⎢ε4 ⎥
⎢ γ xz ⎥
⎢ γ xz ⎥
⎢ ε5 ⎥
⎢ ⎥
⎢ ⎥
⎢ ⎥
⎣⎢ ε6 ⎦⎥
⎣⎢ γ xy ⎦⎥
⎣⎢ γ xy ⎦⎥

γ13 ⎤
γ 23 ⎥⎥
ε33 ⎦⎥

ε 22
γ 23

A f
As for stress tensor, to simplify the constitutive law  the 
i lif h
i i l
h
strain tensor can be represented in the vector form 
(also called as Kelvin‐Voigt notation). 
11

22

33

23,32 13,31 12,21

1

2

3

4

5

= [ R ][Tσ ][ R ] [ ε i ]( x , y , z )
[εi ](1,2,3
1 2 3)
−1

deformation in the 
rotated coordinate 
d
di
system (1,2,3)

6

By replacing the components 2ε12, 2ε13, 2ε23 by strains γ12,
γ13, γ23 .

28

deformation in the 
reference coordinate 
f
i
transformation 
system (x,y,z)
matrix

CONTINUUM MECHANICS

CONTINUUM MECHANICS
reminder

Generalized Hooke’s law (*):

reminder
General case of the anisotropic body:

absolute or invariant notation
b l
i
i
i
index notation
matrix form representation

σ = C :ε

ε = S :σ

σij = Cijkl ε kl

εij = Sijkl σkl

⎡ ε1 ⎤ ⎡ S11
⎢ε ⎥ ⎢ S
⎢ 2 ⎥ ⎢ 12
⎢ ε3 ⎥ ⎢ S13
⎢ ⎥=⎢
⎢ ε 4 ⎥ ⎢ S14
⎢ ε5 ⎥ ⎢ S15
⎢ ⎥ ⎢
⎣⎢ ε6 ⎦⎥ ⎣⎢ S16

ε j = Sij σi

σi = Cij ε j

{σ} = [C ]{ε}

{ε} = [ S ]{σ}

stiffness matrix
compliance matrix
Components Cij and Sij correspond to the material and depend on its elastic 
properties (Young’ss moduli, Poisson
properties (Young
moduli, Poisson’ss ratios, Shear moduli)
ratios, Shear moduli)

⎡ σ1 ⎤ ⎡ C11
⎢ σ ⎥ ⎢C
⎢ 2 ⎥ ⎢ 12
⎢ σ3 ⎥ ⎢C13
⎢ ⎥=⎢
⎢σ4 ⎥ ⎢C14
⎢ σ5 ⎥ ⎢C15
⎢ ⎥ ⎢
⎢⎣ σ6 ⎥⎦ ⎢⎣C16

[C ] = [ S ]

−1

29

S12

S13

S14

S15

S 22
S 23

S 23
S33

S 24
S34

S 25
S35

S 24

S34

S 44

S 45

S 25

S35

S 45

S55

S 26

S36

S 46

S56

C12
C22

C13
C23

C14
C24

C15
C25

C23
C24

C33
C34

C34
C44

C35
C45

C25
C26

C35
C36

C45
C46

C55
C56

S16 ⎤
S 26 ⎥⎥
S36 ⎥

S 46 ⎥
S56 ⎥

S66 ⎦⎥

⎡ σ1 ⎤
⎢σ ⎥
⎢ 2⎥
⎢ σ3 ⎥
⎢ ⎥
⎢σ4 ⎥
⎢ σ5 ⎥
⎢ ⎥
⎣⎢ σ6 ⎦⎥

C16 ⎤
C26 ⎥⎥
C36 ⎥

C46 ⎥
C56 ⎥

C66 ⎥⎦

⎡ ε1 ⎤
⎢ε ⎥
⎢ 2⎥
⎢ ε3 ⎥
⎢ ⎥
⎢ε4 ⎥
⎢ ε5 ⎥
⎢ ⎥
⎢⎣ ε6 ⎥⎦

[C ] = [ S ]

−1

Ö 21 independent 
material constants
enough to define
enough to define 
compliance and stiffness 
matrices

30

CONTINUUM MECHANICS

CONTINUUM MECHANICS
reminder

Orthotropic material (which has 3 plane of the 
symmetry) suitable for the textile composites 2D
symmetry) suitable for the textile composites 2D
⎡ ε 1 ⎤ ⎡ S11
⎢ε ⎥ ⎢ S
⎢ 2 ⎥ ⎢ 12
⎢ε 3 ⎥ ⎢ S13
⎢ ⎥=⎢
⎢ε 4 ⎥ ⎢ 0
⎢ε 5 ⎥ ⎢ 0
⎢ ⎥ ⎢
⎣⎢ε 6 ⎦⎥ ⎣⎢ 0

S12

S13

0

0

S 22
S 23

S 23
S 33

0
0

0
0

0

0

S 44

0

0

0

0

S55

0

0

0

0

⎡σ 1 ⎤ ⎡C11 C12
⎢σ ⎥ ⎢C
⎢ 2 ⎥ ⎢ 12 C22
⎢σ 3 ⎥ ⎢C13 C23
⎢ ⎥=⎢
0
⎢σ 4 ⎥ ⎢ 0
⎢σ 5 ⎥ ⎢ 0
0
⎢ ⎥ ⎢
0
⎣⎢σ 6 ⎦⎥ ⎢⎣ 0
31

C13
C23
C33
0
0
0

0
0
0
C44
0
0

0
0
0
0
C55
0

0 ⎤ ⎡σ 1 ⎤
0 ⎥⎥ ⎢⎢σ 2 ⎥⎥
0 ⎥ ⎢σ 3 ⎥
⎥⎢ ⎥
0 ⎥ ⎢σ 4 ⎥
0 ⎥ ⎢σ 5 ⎥
⎥⎢ ⎥
S 66 ⎦⎥ ⎣⎢σ 6 ⎦⎥
0 ⎤ ⎡ε1 ⎤
0 ⎥⎥ ⎢⎢ε 2 ⎥⎥
0 ⎥ ⎢ε 3 ⎥
⎥⎢ ⎥
0 ⎥ ⎢ε 4 ⎥
0 ⎥ ⎢ε 5 ⎥
⎥⎢ ⎥
C66 ⎦⎥ ⎢⎣ε 6 ⎦⎥

reminder
Generalized Hooke’s law for the orthotropic material:
⎡ 1
⎢ E
⎢ 1
⎢ ν 21

⎡ ε1 ⎤ ⎢⎢ E2
⎢ε ⎥ ⎢
⎢ 2 ⎥ ⎢ − ν 31
⎢ ε3 ⎥
E3
⎢ ⎥ = ⎢⎢
ε
⎢ 4⎥ ⎢ 0
⎢ ε5 ⎥ ⎢
⎢ ⎥ ⎢
⎣⎢ ε 6 ⎦⎥ ⎢ 0


⎢ 0
⎣⎢

Ö 9 independent material 
constants enough to 
define compliance and 
stiffness matrices

independent constants
dependent constants
32

ν12
E1



ν13
E1

0

0

1
E2



ν 23
E2

0

0

ν 32
E3

1
E3

0

0

0

0

1
G23

0

0

0

0

1
G13

0

0

0

0






0 ⎥


0 ⎥


0 ⎥


0 ⎥


0 ⎥

1 ⎥

G12 ⎦⎥

⎡ σ1 ⎤
⎢ ⎥
⎢σ2 ⎥
⎢ σ3 ⎥
⎢ ⎥
⎢σ4 ⎥
⎢ σ5 ⎥
⎢ ⎥
⎣⎢ σ6 ⎦⎥

Sij = SSji Ö Ei = E j
υij υ ji

CONTINUUM MECHANICS

CONTINUUM MECHANICS
reminder
If the transversal plane of the symmetry can be defined then 
constitutive relation for transversely isotropic material can be
constitutive relation for transversely isotropic material can be 
used (suitable for the UD composite ply):

Definition of the stiffness matrix components for 
orthotropic material:
orthotropic material:

C11 =

C22 =

C33 =

(1 − ν23 ν32 )E1
α

(1 − ν13 ν31 )E2
α

(1 − ν12 ν21 ) E3

C12 =

( ν21 + ν31ν23 ) E1 = ( ν12 + ν32 ν13 )E2

C13 =

( ν31 + ν21ν32 ) E1 = ( ν13 + ν12 ν23 ) E3

C23 =

α
C44 = G23

α

reminder

⎡ ε1 ⎤ ⎡ S11
⎢ε ⎥ ⎢ S
⎢ 2 ⎥ ⎢ 12
⎢ε 3 ⎥ ⎢ S12
⎢ ⎥=⎢
⎢ε 4 ⎥ ⎢ 0
⎢ε 5 ⎥ ⎢ 0
⎢ ⎥ ⎢
⎣⎢ε 6 ⎦⎥ ⎢⎣ 0

α

α

α

( ν32 + ν12 ν31 ) E2 = ( ν23 + ν21ν13 )E3
α

C55 = G13

S12
S 22
S 23
0
0

S12
S 23
S 22
0
0

0

0

0

0

C12
C22

C12
C23

0
0

0
0

C23

C22

0

0

0

0

0

0
C22 − C23
2
0

C66

0

0

0

0

⎡σ 1 ⎤ ⎡C11
⎢σ ⎥ ⎢C12
⎢ 2⎥ ⎢
⎢σ 3 ⎥ ⎢C12
⎢ ⎥=⎢
⎢σ 4 ⎥ ⎢ 0
⎢σ 5 ⎥ ⎢ 0
⎢ ⎥ ⎢
⎣⎢σ 6 ⎥⎦ ⎢⎣ 0

α

C66 = G12

with α = 1 − ν12 ν21 − ν13ν31 − ν23ν32 − 2 ν21ν32 ν13

33

0
0
0
0
0
0
2(S 22 − S 23 ) 0
0
S 66

0

⎤ ⎡σ 1 ⎤
⎥ ⎢σ ⎥
⎥ ⎢ 2⎥
⎥ ⎢σ 3 ⎥
⎥⎢ ⎥
⎥ ⎢σ 4 ⎥
⎥ ⎢σ 5 ⎥
⎥⎢ ⎥
S 66 ⎦⎥ ⎢⎣σ 6 ⎥⎦
0
0
0
0
0

Ö 5 independent material 
constants enough to 
define compliance and 
stiffness matrices

0 ⎤ ⎡ε ⎤
1
0 ⎥⎥ ⎢ε ⎥
⎢ 2⎥
0 ⎥ ⎢ε ⎥
⎥ ⎢ 3⎥
0 ⎥ ⎢ε 4 ⎥

0 ⎥ ⎢ε 5 ⎥
⎢ ⎥
C66 ⎦⎥ ⎢⎣ε 6 ⎦⎥

i d
independent constants
d t
t t
dependent constants
effect of the transversal 
ff
f h
l
plane of symmetry

34

CONTINUUM MECHANICS

CONTINUUM MECHANICS
reminder

Compliance matrix components for transversely isotropic material:
Components are identical in the transverse plane (2 3)
Components are identical in the transverse plane (2,3)

E1 = El

G23 = G32 = Gt

ν12 = ν13 = νlt

ν21 = ν31 = νtl

35

1
El

Stiffness matrix components for transversely isotropic material: 

C11 =

E2 = E3 = Et

G12 = G13 = Glt

S11 =

reminder

ν23 = ν32 = νt
S12 = −

ν lt
El

=−

S 23 = −

1
S 66 =
Glt

2(S 22 − S 23 ) =

β

C22 = C33 =

ν tl

C44 =

Et

Et
1
Gt

2
t

Et
Gt =
2(1 + ν t )

νt

1
S 22 =
Et

(1−ν )E

C12 = C13 =

l

(1 − ν lt ν tl )Et
β

(C22 − C23 ) =
2

ν tl (1 + ν t )El ν lt (1 + ν t )Et
=
β
β

C23 =

Et
= Gt
2(1 + ν t )

(ν t + ν lt ν tl )Et
β

C55 = C
C66 = G
Glt

β = (1 + ν t )(1 − 2ν lt ν tl − ν t )
36

CONTINUUM MECHANICS

CONTINUUM MECHANICS
reminder

reminder
Compliance matrix components for isotropic material:

Generalized Hooke’s law for isotropic material: 
⎡ ε1 ⎤ ⎡ S11
⎢ε ⎥ ⎢ S
⎢ 2 ⎥ ⎢ 12
⎢ε 3 ⎥ ⎢ S12
⎢ ⎥=⎢
⎢ε 4 ⎥ ⎢ 0
⎢ε 5 ⎥ ⎢ 0
⎢ ⎥ ⎢
⎢⎣ε 6 ⎥⎦ ⎢⎣ 0

S12

S12

0

0

S11

S12

0

0

S12

S11

0

0

0
0

0
0

0

0

0

0

⎡ C11 C12 C12

⎡ σ1 ⎤ ⎢C12 C11 C12
⎢σ ⎥ ⎢C12 C12 C11
⎢ 2⎥ ⎢
⎢ σ3 ⎥ ⎢ 0
0
0
⎢ ⎥=⎢
⎢σ4 ⎥ ⎢
⎢ σ5 ⎥ ⎢ 0
0
0
⎢ ⎥ ⎢
⎣⎢ σ6 ⎦⎥ ⎢
0
0
⎢ 0


2(S11 − S12 )
0
0
2(S11 − S12 )

0
0

0
0

0
1
C11 − C12
2

0
0

0

1
C11 − C12
2

0

0

⎤ ⎡σ 1 ⎤
⎥ ⎢σ ⎥
0
⎥ ⎢ 2⎥
⎥ ⎢σ 3 ⎥
0
⎥⎢ ⎥
0
⎥ ⎢σ 4 ⎥
⎥ ⎢σ 5 ⎥
0
⎥⎢ ⎥
2(S11 − S12 )⎥⎦ ⎢⎣σ 6 ⎥⎦

S11 =

0





0


0



0


1
C11 − C12 ⎥
2

0
0

⎡ ε1 ⎤
⎢ε ⎥
⎢ 2⎥
⎢ ε3 ⎥
⎢ ⎥
⎢ε 4 ⎥
⎢ ε5 ⎥
⎢ ⎥
⎣⎢ ε6 ⎦⎥

1
E

2(S11 − S12 ) =
Ö 2 independent material 
constants enough to 
define compliance and
define compliance and 
stiffness matrices 

S12 = −

ν
E

1
G

Stiffness matrix components for isotropic material:

E (1 − ν )
νE
C12 =
(1 + ν )(1 − 2ν )
(1 + ν )(1 − 2ν )
C11 − C12
E
=G
=
2
2(1 + ν )

C11 =

independent constants
dependent constants

37

38

Negative Poisson’s ratio video (*)
auxetics material (some minerals, paper… etc.)

MECHANICS OF COMPOSITES

UD COMPOSITES
course content
course content

micromechanics
Determination of the elastic properties of a composite  which depend on:
¾ mechanical properties of its constituents (matrix and reinforcement)
mechanical properties of its constituents (matrix and reinforcement)
¾ redistribution of constituents

1 Reminding of continuum mechanics
1.
Reminding of continuum mechanics
2. Calculation of unidirectional composites (simple ply)
2 1 Mi
2.1 Micromechanical analysis and calculation of elastic properties
h i l
l i
d l l ti
f l ti
ti
2.2 Micromechanical analysis and fracture properties calculation
2.3 Macroscopic analysis and definition of elastic properties
2.4 Fracture criteria

Given: 
1. properties of constituents: Ef EmGf Gm νf νm
2. their fractions:  Vf Vm or Mf Mm
Find:
Engineering constants: E1E2G12ν12

⎡ σ1 ⎤ ⎡Q11
⎢σ ⎥ = ⎢Q
⎢ 2 ⎥ ⎢ 12
⎢⎣σ 6 ⎦⎥ ⎣⎢ 0

4. Particular problems: thick composites and hydrothermal analysis

39

ε = Sσ

σ = Qε

3. Laminate  composite
3.1 Design 
3.2 Composite Laminate Theory
y
3.3 Fracture analysis

40

Q12
Q22
0

0 ⎤⎡ ε1 ⎤
0 ⎥ ⎢ε 2 ⎥
⎥⎢ ⎥
Q66 ⎥⎦⎢⎣ε 6 ⎥⎦

⎡ ε1 ⎤ ⎡ S11
⎢ε ⎥ = ⎢ S
⎢ 2 ⎥ ⎢ 12
⎣⎢ε 6 ⎥⎦ ⎣⎢ 0

S12
S 22
0

0 ⎤⎡ σ1 ⎤
0 ⎥ ⎢σ 2 ⎥
⎥⎢ ⎥
S 66 ⎥⎦⎢⎣σ 6 ⎦⎥

2 possible approaches (out of many see review):
2
possible approaches (out of many see review):
¾ strength of the materials (rule of mixtures)
¾ semi‐empirical (Puck’s law, Rabiot’s law)

UD COMPOSITES

UD COMPOSITES
micromechanics

micromechanics

Volume fraction:

Determination of the mass fraction:
Vi = v
= vi / v
/ vc

NF EN ISO 1172: Determination of the volume fraction by calcification for the glass 
reinforced composites

vi  volume of the constituent i, vc total volume of composite,
Vc = Vf + Vm + Vp = 1

Mf =

volume of the porosity (<1%: good quality, 5%:poor quality)
volume
of the porosity (<1%: good quality 5%:poor quality)
Mass fraction:
Mi = mi / mc
mi volume of constituent I,
l
f
i
mc total volume of composite
l l
f
i

Vf × ρ f
V f × ρ f + Vm × ρm

41

Vf =

Vf =

M f / ρf
M f Mm
+
ρf
ρm

m1: initial mass of the crucible
m2: initial mass of the crucible + specimen
m3: initial mass of the crucible + specimen after
m3: initial mass of the crucible + specimen after 
calcification 

Thickness measurement (prepregs)

Mc = Mf + Mm = 1

Mf =

m3 − m1
*100
m2 − m1

ρf and ρm densities of 
reinforcement and matrix

with

htheoretical *V f _ theoretical

h: thickness of composite
h: thickness of composite

hmesured
htheoretical =

42

G
10* ρ f *V f _ theoretical

UD COMPOSITES

UD COMPOSITES
micromechanics

Micromechanics models (*)
R l f i
Rule of mixtures: to determine the E1 and ν12
d
i
h E1 d 12
matrix
fibre

G: weight (g/m
G:
weight (g/m²))
ρf : density (g/cm3)

micromechanics
Rule of mixtures: to determine the E2 and G12
P

P

ε f = ε m = ε1

P = σ1S

P = σ f S f + σm Sm

P = Pf + Pm

σ1 = E1ε1 =

ε f = σ2 / E f

P ε1 E f S f ε1 Em S m
=
+
= ε1 ( E f V f + EmVm )
S
S
S

E1 = E f V f + EmVm
43

σ f = σm = σ2

P = E f ε f S f + Em ε m S m

ε m = σ 2 / Em

ε 2 = V f ε f + Vm ε m

1 V f Vm
=
+
E2 E f Em

ν12 = ν f V f + ν mVm
44

ε2 = V f

σ2
σ
+ Vm 2
Ef
Em

V f Vm
1
=
+
G12 G f Gm
44

UD COMPOSITES

UD COMPOSITES
micromechanics

micromechanics: failure
micromechanics: failure 

Semi‐empirical approach:

Puck’s law

E2 =

(

Em 1 + 0,85 ⋅ V f2

(1 − V )

1 25
1,25

f

)

E
+Vf m
Ef

G12 = Gm

G f (1 + V f ) + GmVm

G f Vm + Gm (1 + V f )

Rabiot’s law (applicable for the glass reinforced composites)

E2 = β E ' + (1 − β ) E ''

β = 0,197

E ' = E f V f + EmVm

1 V f Vm
=
+
E '' E f Em

matrix dominated ductile failure

Tension failure fiber

02
Th
The same for G12 but with 
f G12 b
i h β = 0,
45

46

matrix dominated brittle failure

UD COMPOSITES

UD COMPOSITES
micromechanics: failure
micromechanics: failure 

The prediction of strength
The prediction of strength 
Experiments
parameters using micromechanics 
is difficult task. 

Should be performed standard 
Should
be performed standard
experiments to determine 
strength

Micromechanics 
(Rule of mixtures,etc…)

Case 1: εrf > εrm

σrf

Initiation of failure driven by failure of the matrix material 

σ′f'

If Vf f < V
If V
< V’f , the failure of the matrix automatically results in fiber 
, the failure of the matrix automatically results in fiber
failure, tensile stress of a composite is defined by Eq.2. 
In case when Vf f >V’f failure of matrix occurs before failure of 
fiber, and tensile stress of a composite defined by Eq.1             

σrf

Stress

Objective: to determine the strength in longitudinal direction (direction of fiber) 
of a composite based on the strength properties of the constituents (fiber and
of a composite based on the strength properties of the constituents (fiber and 
matrix) and their redistribution.

micromechanics: failure
micromechanics: failure 

σrm
εrm εrf

Strain

2 possible cases for the longitudinal failure:

εrf > εrm

σ r1 = σ rff V f Eq. 1

εrf < εrm

σ r1 = σ' f V f + σ rm (1 − V f )

σrm
47

48

0

V´f

Eq. 2

1

Vf fibre volume fraction

UD COMPOSITES

UD COMPOSITES
micromechanics: failure
micromechanics: failure 

Case 2: εrf < εrm

Case 1: εrf > εrm

Rapture of a composite is driven by 
the failure of fibers.

σrf

σ r1
q
r1 = σ rm (1 − V f ) Eq. 4
0

σrm
σ′m

V´f Vfcrit

Multi‐cracking in the matrix material

1 Vf

If Vf < V’f , then fiber failure occurs before matrix one, and 
tensile stress of composite defined by Eq 4
tensile stress of composite defined by  Eq.4. 

Fibers are more brittle than matrix 
(carbon/epoxy)

Otherwise, Vf > V’f failure of fiber automatically results in 
matrix failure in this case tensile stress defined by Eq 3
matrix failure, in this case tensile stress defined by Eq.3.

Stress concentration of one fiber 
brings total rapture of the composite
brings total rapture of the composite.

εrm

εrf

Case 2: εrf < εrm

Matrix is more brittle than fibers
(glass/polyester) 
(glass/polyester)

σ r1 = σ rf V f + σ m' (1 − V f ) Eq. 3

There isn’t any reinforcement effect  σ
rm
when fiber volume fraction lower 
than Vfcrit
than V

49

micromechanics: failure
micromechanics: failure 

σrf

50

UD COMPOSITES

UD COMPOSITES
lamina behavior
lamina behavior 

lamina behavior
lamina behavior 

Generalized Hooke’s law for 2D:

Relations for a orthotropic material:
Q11 =

σ = Qε
⎡ σ1 ⎤ ⎡Q11
⎢σ ⎥ = ⎢Q
⎢ 2 ⎥ ⎢ 12
⎣⎢σ 6 ⎦⎥ ⎣⎢ 0

Q12
Q22
0

0 ⎤⎡ ε1 ⎤
0 ⎥ ⎢ε 2 ⎥
⎥⎢ ⎥
Q66 ⎦⎥⎢⎣ε 6 ⎥⎦

ε = Sσ
⎡ ε1 ⎤ ⎡ S11
⎢ε ⎥ = ⎢ S
⎢ 2 ⎥ ⎢ 12
⎣⎢ε 6 ⎥⎦ ⎣⎢ 0

S12
S 22
0

Q12 = −

0 ⎤⎡ σ1 ⎤
0 ⎥ ⎢σ 2 ⎥
⎥⎢ ⎥
S 66 ⎥⎦⎣⎢σ 6 ⎦⎥

Q22 =

S11
E2
E2
E
=
=
= 2 Q11
S11S 22 − S122 1 − ν12 ν 21 1 − E2 ν 2
E1
12
E1

ν12 E2
ν 21 E1
S12
=
= ν12Q22 =
= ν 21Q11
1 − ν12 ν 21
S11S 22 − S122 1 − ν12 ν 21

Matrix form for a orthotropic material:

[Qij] reduced stiffness matrix

51

S 22
E1
E1
=
=
S11S 22 − S122 1 − ν12 ν 21 1 − E2 ν 2
12
E1

52

⎡ 1

⎡ ε1 ⎤ ⎢ E1
⎢ε ⎥ = ⎢− ν 21
⎢ 2 ⎥ ⎢ E2
⎣⎢ε 6 ⎦⎥ ⎢
⎢ 0
⎣⎢

ν12
E1
1
E2



0


0 ⎥
⎥ ⎡ σ1 ⎤
0 ⎥ ⎢σ 2 ⎥
⎥⎢ ⎥
σ
1 ⎥ ⎣⎢ 6 ⎥⎦

G12 ⎥⎦

Q66 =

1
= G12
S 66

UD COMPOSITES

UD COMPOSITES
tests

Determination of the mechanical properties

tests
Longitudinal:

Transverse:

In‐plane shear:

Torsion:

For complete elastic analysis of a orthotropic or transversely isotropic material we 
l
l
l
f
h
l
l
need only 4 material properties defined: 

E1 , E2 , G12 , ν12
¾ Tensile test (International Standard ISO 527‐4 for woven 
and multiaxial composites and ISO 527‐5 for UD)
• tensile test in longitudinal direction 
• tensile test in transverse direction 
tensile test in transverse direction

E1 ,ν 12

Tensile test video
Gl fib (*)
Glass fiber (*)

E2

¾ Shear test (International Standard ISO 14129)
• tensile test for ± 45 ° specimen

G12

53

54

UD COMPOSITES

UD COMPOSITES
tests

lamina behavior
lamina behavior 
Off‐axis stiffness and transformation rules (*):
There is relation between components of the reduced stiffness matrix Qij in 
There is relation between components of the reduced stiffness matrix Q
in
principle coordinates and components of the reduced stiffness matrix Q´ij in 
arbitrary coordinate system (or off‐axis stiffness). The relation can be obtained 
z
3
b
by rotating coordinate by angle Θ
t ti
di t b
l Θ around the 3 axis.
d th 3 i

[Q′] = [T ] [Q ][ R ][T ][ R ]
−1

2

−1

y

θ

⎡c
s
2s c ⎤
⎢ 2

[T ] = ⎢ s c2 −2s c ⎥

2
2⎥
⎣⎢ − s c s c c − s ⎦⎥
2

55

56

⎡1
[R] = ⎢⎢0
⎣⎢0

2

0
1
0

0⎤
0⎥

2⎥⎦

x

1

UD COMPOSITES

UD COMPOSITES
lamina behavior
lamina behavior 
Simplified relations between Q’ij and  Qij
U3
U2
1

Components of the reduced stiffness in arbitrary 
coordinate system are:
coordinate system are:
Q´11 = Q11

cos4θ

+ Q22

sin4θ

Q´12 = (Q11 + Q22 ‐ 4Q66)

+ 2(Q12 + 2Q66)

sin2θ

cos2

θ+ Q12

sin2θ

(sin4θ

stiffness transformation
stiffness transformation

cos2θ

+

cos4θ)

Q´16 = (Q11 ‐ Q12 ‐ 2Q66) sinθ cos3θ + (Q12 ‐ Q22 + 2Q66) sin3θ cosθ
Q´22 = Q11 sin4θ + 2(Q12 + 2Q66) sin2θ cos2θ + Q22 cos4 θ
Q´26 = (Q11 ‐ Q12 ‐ 2Q66) sin3θ cosθ + (Q12 ‐ Q22 + 2Q66) sinθ cos3θ

U1 = 1/8 (3Q11+ 3Q22 + 2Q12 + 4Q66)

Q’11

U1

cos(2θ)

cos(4θ)

Q’22
Q

U1

‐cos(2θ)
cos(2θ)

cos(4θ)

U2 = 1/2 (Q
 1/2 (Q11 
11 ‐ Q22)

Q’12

U4

‐cos(4θ)

U3 = 1/8 (Q11+ Q22 ‐ 2Q12 ‐ 4Q66)

Q’66

U5

(4θ)
‐cos(4θ)

Q’16

1/2.sin(2θ)

sin(4θ)

Q’26

1/2.sin(2θ)

‐sin(4θ)

U4 = 1/8 (Q11+ Q22 + 6Q12 ‐ 4Q66)
U5 = 1/8 (Q
1/8 (Q11+ Q
Q22 ‐ 2Q12 + 4Q
4Q66)

Handy equations for isotropic composites design which is the most conservative one.  

Q´66 = [Q11 + Q22 ‐ 2(Q12 + Q66)] sin2θ cos2θ + Q66 (sin4θ + cos4θ)

57

58

UD COMPOSITES

UD COMPOSITES
lamina behavior
lamina behavior 

lamina behavior
lamina behavior 
Simplified relation between S’ij and Sij

Transformation rule for compliance matrix 
components S´ij
components S
S´11 = S11 cos4θ + S22 sin4θ + (2S12 + S66) sin2θ cos2θ
S´12 = (S11 + S22 ‐ S66

) sin2θ

cos2θ

+ S12

(sin4θ

+ cos4θ)

S´16 = [2(S
[2(S11 ‐ S12) ‐
) S66] sinθ
] i θ cos3θ + [2(S
[2(S12 ‐ S22) + S
) S66] sin
] i 3θ cosθ
θ
S´22 = S11 sin4θ + (2S12 + S66) sin2θ cos2θ + S22 cos4 θ
S´26 = [2(S11 ‐ S12) ‐ S66

] sin3θ

cosθ + [2(S12 ‐ S22) + S66] sinθ

cos3θ

S´66 = 2[2(S11 + S22 ‐ 2S12) ‐ S66)] sin2θ cos2θ + S66 (sin4θ + cos4θ)

1

V2

V3

SS’11

V1

cos(2θ)

cos(4θ)

S’22

V1

‐cos(2θ)

cos(4θ)

SS’12

V4

‐cos(4θ)
cos(4θ)

S’66

V5

‐4cos(4θ)

V1 = 1/8 (3S11+ 3S22 + 2S12 + S66)
V2 = 1/2 (S11 ‐ S22)

S’16

sin(2θ)
i (2θ)

2 i (4θ)
2sin(4θ)

S’26

sin(2θ)

‐2sin(4θ)

V3 = 1/8 (S
1/8 (S11+ SS22 ‐ 2S12 ‐ S66)
V4 = 1/8 (S11+ S22 + 6S12 ‐ S66)
V5 = 1/2 (S11+ S22 ‐ 2S12 + S66)

59

60

UD COMPOSITES

UD COMPOSITES
lamina behavior
lamina behavior 

lamina behavior
lamina behavior 

In the reference coordinates (x,y,z):

⎡ε xx ⎤ ⎡ S
⎢ ⎥ ⎢
⎢ε yy ⎥ = ⎢ S
⎢γ xy ⎥ ⎢ S
⎣ ⎦ ⎣

'
11
'
12
'
16

⎡ 1

E
⎡ε xx ⎤ ⎢ x
⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ν xy
⎢ε yy ⎥ = ⎢− E
x
⎢γ xy ⎥ ⎢
⎣ ⎦ ⎢ m1
⎢ E
⎣ x

61

'
12
'
22
'
26

S
S
S



'
16
'
26
'
66

S
S
S

ν yyx

Ey
1
Ey
m2
Ey

1 cos 4 θ sin 4 θ 1 ⎛ 1 2ν12 ⎞ 2
⎟ sin 2θ
=
+
+ ⎜⎜

Ex
E1
E2
4 ⎝ G12
E1 ⎟⎠

⎤ ⎡σ xx ⎤
⎥⎢ ⎥
⎥ ⎢σ yy ⎥
⎥ ⎢σ xy ⎥
⎦⎣ ⎦

1
sin 4 θ cos 4 θ 1 ⎛ 1 2ν12 ⎞ 2
⎟ sin 2θ
=
+
+ ⎜⎜

Ey
E1
E2
4 ⎝ G12
E1 ⎟⎠
1
1
1 2ν12 ⎛ 1
1 2ν12
1 ⎞
⎟ cos 2 2θ
=
+
+
−⎜ +
+

G xy E1 E2
E1 ⎜⎝ E1 E2
E1 G12 ⎟⎠

m1 ⎤

Ex ⎥
⎡σ xx ⎤
m2 ⎥ ⎢ ⎥
σ yy
E y ⎥⎥ ⎢ ⎥
⎢σ ⎥
1 ⎥ ⎣ xy ⎦
Gxy ⎥⎦

ν xyy
Ex

=

ν yyx
Ey

=

ν12 ⎛ 1
1 2ν12
1 ⎞ sin 2 2θ


− ⎜⎜ +
+
E1 ⎝ E1 E2
E1 G12 ⎟⎠ 4
⎡ ⎛ 1 2ν 12 2 ⎞
⎛ 1 2ν 12 2 ⎞⎤

− ⎟⎟ − cs 3 ⎜⎜

− ⎟⎟⎥
m1 = E x ⎢c 3 s⎜⎜
E1
E1 ⎠
E1
E2 ⎠ ⎦
⎝ G12
⎣ ⎝ G12

Ex, Ey, Gxy, νxy and νyx (another notation E’1, E’2, G’12, ν’12 and  ν’21) : elastic moduli 
and Poisson’s coefficients in  (x,y,z) coordinates.
(
)
m1 and m2 coupling coefficients shear/traction

⎡ ⎛ 1 2ν 12 2 ⎞ 3 ⎛ 1 2ν 12 2 ⎞⎤

− ⎟ − c s⎜⎜

− ⎟⎟⎥
m2 = E y ⎢cs 3 ⎜⎜
E1 E1 ⎟⎠
E1
E2 ⎠ ⎦
⎝ G12
⎣ ⎝ G12

UD COMPOSITES
laminate failure modes
laminate failure  modes 

63

Tension failure of cross‐ply CFRP

s = sin θ

62

UD COMPOSITES

Tension failure of multidirectional laminate

c = cos θ

failure criteria
failure criteria 
The goal is to predict a failure of a lamina (or ply)
Assuming plane stress state 
Assuming
plane stress state
Following criteria are considered:
¾ Maximum stress 
¾ Maximum strain
¾ Tsai‐Hill
¾ Tsai‐Wu
¾ Hoffman

In‐plane shear failure of multidirectional laminate

64

UD COMPOSITES

UD COMPOSITES
failure criteria
failure criteria 

failure criteria
failure criteria 

Maximum stress criterion:
tension

σ1 / X+ < 1 (X+  : longitudinal tensile strength) 
σ2 / Y+ < 1 (Y+  : transversely tensile strength) 

compression

|σ1 / X‐ | < 1 (X‐
|σ2 / Y‐ | < 1 (Y‐

F11σ12 + 2 F12σ1σ 2 + F22σ 22 + F66σ62 + F1σ1 + F2σ 2 = 1
σ12
+
X +X −

: longitudinal compressive strength) 
: transversely compressive strength) 

tension

compression

65

shear

Tsai‐Hill
Tsai
Hill

+

X+ = X−
Y =Y

< 1 (V
( +: transversely tensile failure strain)
y
)

Hoffman

|ε1 / U‐ | < 1 (U‐: longitudinal compressive failure strain)
|ε2 / V
/ V‐ | < 1 (V
| < 1 (V‐: transversely compressive failure strain)
: transversely compressive failure strain)
|ε6 / G | < 1 (G: shear failure strain)

T iW
Tsai‐Wu
66

UD COMPOSITES

σ 22
σ62 ⎡ 1
1 ⎤
1 ⎤
⎡ 1
+
+ ⎢ + − − ⎥ σ1 + ⎢ + − − ⎥ σ 2 = 1
+ −
2
Y Y
S
X ⎦
Y ⎦
⎣X
⎣Y



X+ ≠ X−
Y+ ≠Y−
X+ ≠ X−
+

Y ≠Y



F12*

F12




1
2X 2

−0.014 ≤ −

1
+

2X X



−0.041 ≤ −

F12*
X + X −Y +Y −

1
2

Y
≤ −0.008
2X

Y +Y −
≤ −0.022
X +X −

−1 ≤ F12* ≤ 0

UD COMPOSITES
failure criteria
failure criteria 

failure criteria
failure criteria 

Tension of UD

67

X + X −Y +Y −

+

< 1 (U+: longitudinal tensile failure strain)

longitudinal

2 F12* σ1σ 2

Strengths

shear
|σ6 / S | < 1 (S : shear strength)
Maximum strain criterion
ε1 / U+
ε2 2 // V+

Fij σi σ j + Fi σi = 1

Quadratic criterion:

transversal 

68

MECHANIC OF COMPOSITES

LAMINATES
design 
design

course content
course content

1) each ply is denoted by a number representing the angle in degrees between 
the main direction of the ply (direction 1 = fiber direction) and the x axis;
the main direction of the ply (direction 1 = fiber direction) and the x
2) adjacent plies are separated by slash (/) when their angles are different in 
absolute value;
3) th
3) the sequence is described from the bottom face of the laminate z <0 to the 
i d
ib d f
th b tt
f
f th l i t
0 t th
other side, brackets indicate the beginning and end of the stack;
4) if adjacent plies are identical (of the same orientation), then plies will be 
represented by one number with superscript, which indicate the number of plies;
5) plies which are oriented at angles equal but opposite sign are denoted with ±;
6) superscript S placed after the bracket indicates a symmetric laminate (laminate 
is said to be symmetric if the plies above the mid‐plane are a mirror image of 
those below the mid‐plane);
7) symmetrical laminate with an odd number of plies is denoted identically to 
7) symmetrical laminate with an odd number
of plies is denoted identically to
laminate having an even numbers of plies, ply of symmetry is underlined.

1 Reminding of continuum mechanics
1.
Reminding of continuum mechanics
2. Calculation of unidirectional composites (simple ply)
2 1 Mi
2.1 Micromechanical analysis and calculation of elastic properties
h i l
l i
d l l ti
f l ti
ti
2.2 Micromechanical analysis and fracture properties calculation
2.3 Macroscopic analysis and definition of elastic properties
2.4 Fracture criteria
3. Laminate  composite
3.1 Design 
3.2 Composite Laminate Theory
y
3.3 Fracture analysis
4. Particular problems: thick composites and hydrothermal analysis

[0/‐45/90/45/0]s
69

[0/‐45/902/60/0]

LAMINATES

LAMINATES
design 
design

design 
design
Cross ply or orthogonal consists 
of many plies of 0° and 90
of many plies of 0
and 90°
degrees

Sign convention for describing directions

[0/‐45/90/45/0]s

[0/45/90/‐45/0]s
[[0/90]
/ ]s
71

[0/‐45/60]S

70

72

Angle ply or equilibrated [±θ] 
consists of plies +θ° and ‐θ
consists of plies +θ
and θ °

LAMINATES

LAMINATES. THEORY OF PLATES
design 
design

[0/‐45/90/60/30]

[0/‐45/902/60/0]

5 plies of the same 
dimensions, consistent 
of the same materials
of the same materials 
but have 5 different 
fiber orientations

6 plies, 
the subscript 2  denotes two 
plies of 90°
l
f °

A plate is a two‐dimensional structural element, i.e., one of the dimensions (the 
plate thickness h) is small compared to the in‐plane dimensions a and b The load on
plate thickness  h) is small compared to the in‐plane dimensions a and b. The load on 
the plate is applied  perpendicular to the center plane of the plate. In plate theory, 
one generally distinguishes the  following cases: 
1.
2.

[0/‐45/60]S

[0/ 45/60]S
[0/‐45/60]

6 plies 

3.

5 plies 

Subscript s denotes the 
symmetry of the stacking 
from middle plane (again 
the same orientation, ,
materials and dimensions)

Symmetry about the central 
ply

73

Thick plates with a three‐dimensional stress state. These can only be described 
by the full set  of differential equations (rule of thumb: b/h < 5, a>b). 
Thin plates with small deflections. The membrane stresses generated by the 
deflection are small compared to the bending stresses and this simplifies the 
analysis considerably. (rule of thumb: b/h > 5 and w< h/5).
Thin plates with large deflections. The 
membrane stresses generated by the 
d fl
deflection are significant compared to 
f
d
the bending stresses and the plate 
behaves nonlinearly. (rule of thumb: 
b/h > 5 and w > h/5). 

74

LAMINATES

LAMINATES
laminate theories
laminate theories 

laminate theories
laminate theories 

Macroscopic analysis based on the plate 
theory.
There are some widely used theories:
• Love – Kirchhoff 
• Reissner – Mindlin
• high‐order plate theories  




75

76

J. N. Reddy. An Introduction to Continuum 
Mechanics with Applications. Cambridge University 
Press, New York, 2008.
J.N. Reddy Theory and Analysis of elastic plates and 
Shells, 2nd ed., CRC Press, 207, p. 303

CPT ‐ Classical Plate Theory
FSDT ‐ First Order Shear Deformation Theory
TSDT ‐ Third Order Shear Deformation Theory

LAMINATES

LAMINATES
laminate theory
laminate theory 

laminate theory
laminate theory 

Assumptions:
o thin laminate composite plate is considered 
thin laminate composite plate is considered
o the reference frame Oxyz defined in such way that 
Oxy is middle‐plane of the laminate, Oz is 
perpendicular; the upper and lower surfaces of
perpendicular; the upper and lower surfaces of 
the laminate represent by z= ± h/2
o all assumption which correspond to the Love –
Ki hh ff l t th
Kirchhoff plate theory: 
9 straight lines normal to the mid‐surface 
remain straight after deformation
9 straight lines normal to the mid‐surface 
remain normal to the mid‐surface after 
deformation
9 the thickness of the plate does not change 
during deformation.
o material is elastic, homogeneous
material is elastic, homogeneous
o small deformations 

h0
hn

h1

hnn‐11 hk

h/2 x

h2
hk‐1

h/2

Ply k

z

For the ply k stress/strain relation in the O, x, y, z is written as:

[σ]k = [Qij' ]k [ε]
⎡σ xx ⎤
⎡Q'11
⎢σ ⎥ = ⎢Q'
⎢ yy ⎥
⎢ 12
⎣⎢σ xy ⎦⎥ k ⎢⎣Q'16

77

Q'12
Q' 22
Q' 26

Q'16 ⎤ ⎡ε xx ⎤
Q' 26 ⎥ ⎢⎢ε yy ⎥⎥

Q'66 ⎥⎦ k ⎢⎣ γ xy ⎦⎥

78

LAMINATES

LAMINATES
laminate theory
laminate theory 

laminate theory
laminate theory 
At any point of the laminate the deformations [ε] can be determined from 
deformation of the plane [ε0] and the curatives [k] of the middle‐plane 

Displacement field has 1
Displacement
field has 1st order (linearity along z)
order (linearity along z)

u ( x , y , z ) = u 0 ( x , y ) + zϕ x ( x , y )

⎡ε xx ⎤ ⎡ε 0xx ⎤ ⎡ κ x ⎤
⎡ε
⎢ε ⎥ = ⎢ε 0 ⎥ + z ⎢ κ ⎥
⎢ yy ⎥ ⎢ yy ⎥ ⎢ y ⎥
0
⎣⎢ γ xy ⎦⎥ ⎢⎣ γ xy ⎥⎦ ⎣⎢ κ xy ⎦⎥

v ( x , y , z ) = v0 ( x , y ) + z ϕ y ( x , y )

w( x , y , z) = w0 ( x , y)
For Classical Laminate theory, transversal shear deformations are negligible, so 
displacement in‐plane than defined as: 

membrane deformations

∂w ( x, y )
u ( x, y , z ) = u 0 ( x , y ) − z 0
∂x

v ( x, y , z ) = v 0 ( x, y ) − z
79

⎡ ∂u0 ⎤


∂x
⎡ε ⎤ ⎢

∂v0 ⎥
⎢ ⎥
ε m ( M ) = ⎢ε ⎥ = ⎢
⎢ ∂y

⎢γ ⎥ ⎢
⎣ ⎦
∂u0 ∂v0 ⎥


+
⎣⎢ ∂y ∂x ⎥⎦
0
xx
0
yy
0
xy

∂w0 ( x, y )
∂y
80

deformations correspond to 
b
bending and torsion efforts
ff

∂ 2 w0 ⎤
⎢−z

∂x 2 ⎥
⎡ κx ⎤ ⎢
2
∂ w0 ⎥
⎢ ⎥
ε f ( M ) = z ⎢ κ y ⎥ = ⎢⎢ − z
∂y 2 ⎥
⎢ κ xy ⎥ ⎢

2
⎣ ⎦
⎢− 2 z ∂ w0 ⎥
∂x∂y ⎥⎦
⎣⎢

LAMINATES

LAMINATES
laminate theory
laminate theory 

laminate theory
laminate theory 

For ply k the stress/strain relation (in O, x, y, z) then written as:
⎡σ xx ⎤
⎡Q'11
⎢σ ⎥ = ⎢Q'
⎢ yy ⎥
⎢ 12
⎢⎣σ xy ⎥⎦ k ⎣⎢Q'16

Q'12
Q' 22
Q' 26

Q'16 ⎤ ⎡ε 0xx ⎤ ⎡Q'11
⎢ ⎥
Q' 26 ⎥ ⎢ε 0yy ⎥ + z ⎢Q'12


Q'66 ⎦⎥ k ⎢ε 0 ⎥ ⎣⎢Q'16
⎣ xy ⎦

⎡ N xx ⎤ h
h ⎡ σ xx ⎤
hk ⎡ σ xx ⎤
2
2
n
N ( x , y ) = ⎢⎢ N yy ⎥⎥ = ∫ σ(M )dz = ∫ ⎢⎢σ yy ⎥⎥ dz = ∑k =1 ∫ ⎢⎢σ yy ⎥⎥ dz
−h
−h
hk −1
2
2 ⎢σ ⎥
⎢⎣ N xy ⎥⎦
⎢⎣σ xy ⎥⎦ k
⎣ xy ⎦

Q'16 ⎤ ⎡ κ x ⎤
Q' 26 ⎥ ⎢⎢ κ y ⎥⎥

Q'66 ⎦⎥ k ⎣⎢ κ xy ⎥⎦

Q'12
Q' 22
Q' 26

⎡ Nx ⎤

n
N ( x , y ) = ⎢⎢ N y ⎥⎥ = ∑k =1 ∫ ([Q' ]k [ε 0 ] + z[Q' ]k [κ])dz

Resultant forces N(x,y) (expressed per unit length) obtained by integration 
calculated stresses of each ply over the thickness:
z

⎣⎢ N xy ⎥⎦

hk

hk −1

[ ]

N ( x , y ) = [ A] ε 0 +[B ][κ ]

Nx
y
Nxy

Ny

Aij = ∑ k =1 (Q'ij )k (hk − hk −1 )

Ny

Nxy

n

Nxy
Nxy
x

81

Bij =

Nx

82

(

1 n
∑ (Q'ij )k hk2 − hk2−1
2 k =1

LAMINATES

)

LAMINATES
laminate theory
laminate theory 

laminate theory
laminate theory 

Resultant bending and torsion moments M(x,y) (expressed per unit length) 
obtained by integration of the stresses of each ply over the thickness:
obtained by integration of the stresses of each ply over the thickness:

⎡Mx ⎤
hk
n
M ( x , y ) = ⎢⎢ M y ⎥⎥ = ∑k =1 ∫ [Q' ]k ε 0 z + [Q' ]k [κ]z 2 dz
d
hk −1
⎣⎢ M xy ⎦⎥

y
Mxy
Mxy

My

)

[ ]

M ( x , y ) = [B ] ε 0 +[D ][κ ]

My

Mxy
Mx

84

(

)

Bij =

1 n
∑k =1 (Q'ij )k hk2 − hk2−1
2

Dij =

1 n
∑ (Q'ij )k hk3 − hk3−1
3 k =1

x

83

[ ]

(

Mx

z
Mxy

⎡ M xx ⎤ h 2 ⎡σ xx ⎤
⎡M
hk ⎡ σ xx ⎤
n




M ( x , y ) = ⎢ M yy ⎥ = ∫ ⎢σ yy ⎥ z dz = ∑k =1 ∫ ⎢⎢σ yy ⎥⎥ z dz
h
hk −1
⎢⎣ M xy ⎥⎦ − 2 ⎢⎣σ xy ⎥⎦
⎢⎣σ xy ⎥⎦ k

(

)

LAMINATES

LAMINATES
laminate theory
laminate theory 

laminate theory
laminate theory 

Finally, resultant forces N(x,y) and moments M(x,y) as function of the 
d f
deformations give constitutive behavior of the laminate: 
ti
i
tit ti b h i
f th l i t

⎡ N x ⎤ ⎡ A11
⎢ N ⎥ ⎢A
⎢ y ⎥ ⎢ 12
⎢ N xy ⎥ ⎢ A16
⎢ M ⎥ = ⎢B
⎢ x ⎥ ⎢ 11
⎢ M y ⎥ ⎢ B12
⎢ M xy ⎥ ⎢ B

⎦ ⎣ 16

A12
A22
A26
B12
B22
B26

Aij = ∑ k =1 (Q'ij )k (hk − hk −1 )
n

85

A16
A26
A66
B16
B26
B66

B11
B12
B16
D11
D12
D16

B12
B22
B26
D12
D22
D26

B16 ⎤ ⎡ ε 0xx ⎤
⎢ ⎥
B26 ⎥ ⎢ ε 0yy ⎥
⎥ 0
B66 ⎥ ⎢ γ xy ⎥
D16 ⎥ ⎢ κ x ⎥
⎥⎢ ⎥
D26 ⎥ ⎢ κ y ⎥
D66 ⎥⎦ ⎢⎣ κ xy ⎥⎦

extensional stiffness matrix components

(

)

coupling stiffness matrix components

(

)

bending stiffness matrix components

Bij =

1 n
∑k =1 (Q'ij )k hk2 − hk2−1
2

Dij =

1 n
∑ (Q'ij )k hk3 − hk3−1
3 k =1

86

LAMINATES

LAMINATES
laminate theory
laminate theory 

⎡ N x ⎤ ⎡ A11
⎢ N ⎥ ⎢A
⎢ y ⎥ ⎢ 12
⎢ N xy ⎥ ⎢ A16
⎢ M ⎥ = ⎢B
⎢ x ⎥ ⎢ 11
⎢ M y ⎥ ⎢ B12
⎥ ⎢

⎣ M xy ⎦ ⎣ B16

87

A12
A22
A26
B12
B22
B26

A16
A26
A66
B16
B26
B66

B11
B12
B16
D11
D12
D16

B12
B22
B26
D12
D22
D26

B16 ⎤ ⎡ ε 0xx ⎤
⎢ ⎥
B26 ⎥ ⎢ ε 0yy ⎥
⎥ 0
B66 ⎥ ⎢ γ xy ⎥
D16 ⎥ ⎢ κ x ⎥
⎥⎢ ⎥
D26 ⎥ ⎢ κ y ⎥
D66 ⎥⎦ ⎢⎣ κ xy ⎥⎦






laminate theory
laminate theory 

⎡ N x ⎤ ⎡ A11
⎢N ⎥ ⎢
⎢ y ⎥ ⎢ A12
⎢ N xy ⎥ ⎢ 0

⎥=⎢
⎢ M x ⎥ ⎢ B11
⎢ M y ⎥ ⎢ B12
⎥ ⎢

⎢⎣ M xy ⎥⎦ ⎢⎣ B16

traction/shear coupling
t ti /b di
traction/bending coupling
li
traction/torsion coupling
bending/torsion coupling

88

A12

0

B11

B12

A22
0

0
A66

B12
B16

B22
B26

B12
B22

B16
B26

D11
D12

D12
D22

B26

B66

D16

D26

B16 ⎤ ⎡ ε 0xx ⎤
⎢ ⎥
B26 ⎥⎥ ⎢ ε 0yy ⎥
B66 ⎥ ⎢ γ 0xy ⎥
⎥⎢ ⎥
D16 ⎥ ⎢ κ x ⎥
D26 ⎥ ⎢ κ y ⎥
⎥⎢ ⎥
D66 ⎦⎥ ⎢⎣ κ xy ⎥⎦






no traction/shear coupling
t ti /b di
traction/bending coupling
li
traction/torsion coupling
bending/torsion coupling

LAMINATES

LAMINATES
laminate theory
laminate theory 

laminate theory
laminate theory 
Not equilibrated, symmetric

Orthogonal non symmetric
Orthogonal non symmetric
⎡ N x ⎤ ⎡ A11
⎢N ⎥ ⎢
⎢ y ⎥ ⎢ A12
⎢ N xy ⎥ ⎢ 0

⎥=⎢
⎢ M x ⎥ ⎢ B11
⎢ M y ⎥ ⎢ B12

⎥ ⎢
⎢⎣ M xy ⎦⎥ ⎣⎢ 0

A12
A22

0
0

B11
B12

B12
B22

0
B12
B22

A66
0
0

0
D11
D12

0
D12
D22

0

B66

0

0

0 ⎤ ⎡ ε 0xx ⎤
⎢ ⎥
0 ⎥⎥ ⎢ ε 0yy ⎥
B66 ⎥ ⎢ γ 0xy ⎥
⎥⎢ ⎥
0 ⎥⎢ κx ⎥
0 ⎥⎢ κ y ⎥
⎥⎢ ⎥
D66 ⎥⎦ ⎢⎣ κ xy ⎦⎥






⎡ N x ⎤ ⎡ A11
⎢N ⎥ ⎢
⎢ y ⎥ ⎢ A12
⎢ N xy ⎥ ⎢ A16

⎥=⎢
⎢Mx ⎥ ⎢ 0
⎢My ⎥ ⎢ 0

⎥ ⎢
⎢⎣ M xy ⎦⎥ ⎢⎣ 0

no traction/shear coupling
t ti /b di
traction/bending coupling
li
no traction/torsion coupling
no bending/torsion coupling

89

A12

A16

0

0

A22
A26

A26
A66

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

D11
D12

D12
D22

0

0

D16

D26

0 ⎤ ⎡ ε 0xx ⎤
⎢ ⎥
0 ⎥⎥ ⎢ ε 0yy ⎥
0 ⎥ ⎢ γ 0xy ⎥
⎥⎢ ⎥
D16 ⎥ ⎢ κ x ⎥
D26 ⎥ ⎢ κ y ⎥
⎥⎢ ⎥
D66 ⎥⎦ ⎢⎣ κ xy ⎥⎦






90

LAMINATES

LAMINATES
laminate theory
laminate theory 

failure analysis
failure analysis
¾ Multi‐scale nature (micro/meso/macro)
¾ Different mechanisms:
Different mechanisms:
• fiber breakage
• matrix cracking
• fiber/matrix decohesion
fib /
i d h i
• delamination
¾ coupling
¾ internal

g
y
y
Orthogonal symmetry
⎡ N x ⎤ ⎡ A11
⎢N ⎥ ⎢
⎢ y ⎥ ⎢ A12
⎢ N xy ⎥ ⎢ 0

⎥=⎢
⎢Mx ⎥ ⎢ 0
⎢My ⎥ ⎢ 0
⎥ ⎢

⎢⎣ M xy ⎦⎥ ⎢⎣ 0

91

traction/shear coupling
no traction/bending coupling
t ti /b di
li
no traction/torsion coupling
bending/torsion coupling

A12
A22

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0
0

A66
0
0

0
D11
D12

0
D12
D22

0

0

0

0

⎤ ⎡ ε xx ⎤
⎥ ⎢ ε0 ⎥
⎥ ⎢ yy ⎥
0 ⎥ ⎢ γ 0xy ⎥
⎥⎢ ⎥
0 ⎥⎢ κx ⎥
0 ⎥⎢ κ y ⎥
⎥⎢ ⎥
D66 ⎥⎦ ⎢⎣ κ xy ⎦⎥
0
0

0






no traction/shear coupling
no traction/bending coupling
t ti /b di
li
no traction/torsion coupling
no bending/torsion coupling

92

LAMINATES

LAMINATES
failure analysis
failure analysis

failure analysis
failure analysis

Damage evolution

Define the 
configuration of the 
fi
ti
f th
laminate and 
boundary conditions

Calculation of the 
deformation filed of the 
laminate εxx, εyy, γxy

Determinations of 
the constitutive 
matrices [A], [B], [D]

93

Choose a failure 
Choose
a failure
criterion for each 
ply.  Determination 
of loading
of loading

First ply failure 
(FPF)
93

Calculation deformations  ε11, 
ε22, γ12  and stresses σ11, σ22, 
τ12  in material coordinates at 
the bottom (z=hk) and top 
( k‐1) 
(z=h
) surfaces of each ply 

Last ply failure 
(LPF)

94

LAMINATES

LAMINATES
failure analysis
failure analysis

failure analysis
failure analysis

Determination of the last ply failure (LPF)
Determination of the last ply failure (LPF)

Complete ply failure (CPF)
Complete ply failure (CPF)

Partial ply failure (PPF)
Partial ply failure (PPF)

After determining the FPF, repeat the calculation to determine failure of  the 
second ply and so on until the last ply is broken
second ply, and so on until the last ply is broken. 
Whatever the mode of failure, it 
py
is assumed that the ply is no 
longer able to support the load

However, for each iteration, we must take into account the plies where the 
f t
fracture was determined. How? The failed ply remains physically in the same 
d t
i d H ? Th f il d l
i
h i ll i th
place, but some elastic characteristics are reduced.

E2 = G12 = 0
E1 ≠ 0

Two approaches are generally adopted:
E1 = E2 = G12 = 0
Complete ply failure (CPF)
Partial ply failure (PPF)

95

1) Transversal or shear 
damage
g

96

2) Fiber failure
E1 = E
= E2 = G
= G12 = 0
=0

MECHANIC OF COMPOSITES

THICK COMPOSITES
course content

laminate theory
a
ate t eo y

1 Reminding of continuum mechanics
1.
Reminding of continuum mechanics
2. Calculation of unidirectional composites (simple ply)
2 1 Mi
2.1 Micromechanical analysis and calculation of elastic properties
h i l
l i
d l l ti
f l ti
ti
2.2 Micromechanical analysis and fracture properties calculation
2.3 Macroscopic analysis and definition of elastic properties
2.4 Fracture criteria

Laminate theory with taking into account transversal shear
y
g
The classical laminate theory becomes quite unsuitable in the case of thick 
composites (relation width/thickness is less than 10) to describe the mechanical 
behavior An improvement consists of taking into account the transverse shear
behavior. An improvement consists of taking into account the transverse shear 
displacement of the 1st order (linear along z).

3. Laminate  composite
3.1 Design 
3.2 Composite Laminate Theory
y
3.3 Fracture analysis

Th t i t
The strain tensor has 5 nonzero components:
h 5
t

4. Particular problems: thick composites and hydrothermal analysis

97

98

⎡ ε xx

ε ( M ) = ⎢ε xy
⎢ ε xz


THICK COMPOSITES

ε xy
ε yy
ε yz

ε xz ⎤

ε yz ⎥
0 ⎥⎦

THICK COMPOSITES
laminate theory
a
ate t eo y

laminate theory
a
ate t eo y
Deformation field consists of:
1) D f
1) Deformation field of membrane and flexion 
ti fi ld f
b
d fl i

The normal to the mid‐surface remains straight but not necessarily perpendicular
to the mid‐surface
h
d
f

⎡ ∂ϕ x

⎡ ∂u0 ⎤




0
∂x
∂x



⎡ ε xx ⎤ ⎡ ε xx ⎤
⎡ κx ⎤ ⎢
⎢ ∂ϕ y

⎢ ⎥ ⎢ 0 ⎥
⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ∂v0 ⎥
ε mf ( M ) = ⎢ε yy ⎥ = ⎢ε yy ⎥ + z ⎢ κ y ⎥ = ⎢
+ z⎢


∂y
∂y



⎢ γ xy ⎥ ⎢ γ 0 ⎥
⎢ κ xy ⎥ ⎢
⎣ ⎦ ⎢⎣ xy ⎥⎦
⎣ ⎦ ⎢ ∂u ∂v ⎥


∂ϕ
∂ϕ
y
0
0
⎢ x+

⎢ ∂y + ∂x ⎥
∂x ⎦


⎣ ∂y

According to the displacement field of the first order adopted as:
According to the displacement field of the first order adopted as:

2) transversal deformations

u ( x, y , z ) = u0 ( x, y ) + zϕ x ( x, y )
v ( x, y , z ) = v0 ( x, y ) + zϕ y ( x, y )
w ( x, y , z ) = w0 ( x, y )
99

w0
⎡ ∂∂w

+ ϕx ⎥

⎡ γ yz ⎤
x

γ c (M ) = ⎢ ⎥ =⎢ ∂w

⎣ γ xz ⎦ ⎢ 0 + ϕ y ⎥
⎥⎦
⎢⎣ ∂y
100

THICK COMPOSITES

THICK COMPOSITES
laminate theory
a
ate t eo y

laminate theory
a
ate t eo y

Resultant forces in shear Q(x,y) for the laminate or multi‐layer composite are 
obtained by integrating the stresses of each ply over the thickness of the
obtained by integrating the stresses of each ply over the thickness of the 
composite:

Expression of the resultant membrane forces N(x,y), resultant moments M(x,y) 
and resultant shear forces Q(x y) as function of the deformations of composite can
and resultant shear forces Q(x,y) as function of the deformations of composite can 
be written in the matrix form as:

hk
2 σ
⎡Qy ⎤
⎡ yz ⎤
⎡σ ⎤
n
Q ( x, y ) = ⎢ ⎥ = ∫ ⎢ ⎥ ddz = ∑ k =1 ∫ ⎢ yz ⎥ ddz
hk −1 ⎣ σ xz ⎦
⎣Qx ⎦ − h 2 ⎣ σ xz ⎦
k
hk
⎡Q ⎤
n
Q ( x, y ) = ⎢ y ⎥ = ∑ k =1 ∫ [C ']k [ γ c ] dz
hk −1
⎣Qx ⎦
h

Q ( x, y ) = [ F ][ γ c ]

⎡ N x ⎤ ⎡ A11
⎢ N ⎥ ⎢A
⎢ y ⎥ ⎢ 12
⎢ N xy ⎥ ⎢ A16

⎥ ⎢
⎢ M x ⎥ = ⎢ B11
⎢ M y ⎥ ⎢ B12

⎥ ⎢
⎢ M xyy ⎥ ⎢ B16
⎢Q ⎥ ⎢ 0
⎢ y ⎥ ⎢
⎢⎣ Qx ⎦⎥ ⎢⎣ 0

z

Fij = ∑ k =1 ( C 'ij )k ( hk − hk −1 )

y

n

Qx
Qy

n

Qx
x

B11
B12
B16
D11
D12
D16
0
0

B12
B22
B26
D12
D22
D26
0
0

B16
B26
B66
D16
D26
D66
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
F44
F45

0 ⎤⎡ε 0xx ⎤
⎢ ⎥
0 ⎥⎥⎢ ε 0yy ⎥
0 ⎥⎢ γ 0xy ⎥
⎥⎢ ⎥
0 ⎥⎢ κ x ⎥
0 ⎥⎢ κ y ⎥
⎥⎢ ⎥
0 ⎥⎢ κ xyy ⎥
F45 ⎥⎢ γ 0yz ⎥
⎥⎢ ⎥
F55 ⎦⎥⎢⎣ γ 0xz ⎦⎥

′ = G23 cos 2 θ + G13 sin 2 θ
C44
′ = (G13 − G23 )sin θ cos θ
C45
′ = G13 cos 2 θ + G23 sin 2 θ
C55

102

THICK COMPOSITES

SANDWITCH MATERIALS
laminate theory
a
ate t eo y

Limitations of the laminate theory of thick composites

de t o
definition
Describes the behavior of a beam, plate, or shell which consists of three layers ‐
two facesheets (skins) and one core
two facesheets
(skins) and one core

According to improvement, it is not negligible the shear stresses in the skin 
But for this approach, the transverse shear deformations are independent of z, so 
f h
h h
h
d f
d
d
f
constant along thickness. This implies that the shear stresses are piecewise 
constant in thickness, so discontinuous in the interfaces.
For a better description of the mechanical behavior of thick composites, it is 
y
ff
f
necessary to introduce correction coefficients of shear:
⎡Q y ⎤ ⎡ H 44
⎢Q ⎥ = ⎢ H
⎣ x ⎦ ⎣ 45

H 45 ⎤
[γ c ]
H 55 ⎥⎦

H ij = k ij Fij
103

A16
A26
A66
B16
B26
B66
0
0

Fij = ∑k =1 (C 'ij )k (hk − hk −1 )

Qy

101

A12
A22
A26
B12
B22
B26
0
0

104

SANDWITCH MATERIALS

SANDWITCH MATERIALS

Hypothesis/Notations
ypot es s/ otat o s
o h is core thickness, h1
is core thickness, h1 and h2
and h2 are thicknesses
are thicknesses of the upper and lower skins 
of the upper and lower skins
respectively 
o the thickness of the core is much larger than those of skin
o the displacement of the core is linear function of z
the displacement of the core is linear function of z
o displacements of the facesheets are uniform in‐plane 
o the core transmits the transverse shear stress only
o transverse shear stresses are negligible in the facesheets
t
h
t
li ibl i th f
h t

105

constitutive equations
constitutive equations
Expression of the resultant membrane forces N(x,y), resultant moments M(x,y) 
and resultant shear forces Q(x y) as function of the deformations of sandwich can
and resultant shear forces Q(x,y) as function of the deformations of sandwich can 
be written in the matrix form as:

⎡ N x ⎤ ⎡ A11 A12
⎢ N ⎥ ⎢A
⎢ y ⎥ ⎢ 12 A22
⎢ N xy ⎥ ⎢ A16 A26

⎥ ⎢
⎢ M x ⎥ = ⎢C11 C12
⎢ M y ⎥ ⎢C12 C22

⎥ ⎢
⎢ M xy ⎥ ⎢C16 C26
⎢Q ⎥ ⎢ 0
0
⎢ y ⎥ ⎢
0
⎣⎢ Qx ⎦⎥ ⎣⎢ 0

A16
A26
A66
C16
C26

B11
B12
B16
D11
D12

B12
B22
B26
D12
D22

B16
B26
B66
D16
D26

0
0
0
0
0

C66
0
0

D16
0
0

D26
0
0

D66
0
0

0
F44
F45

106

SANDWITCH MATERIALS

HYDROTHERMAL ANALYSIS

co st tut e equat o s
constitutive equations

general statement
general statement
The materials deform when the temperature changes from T0 to T or when they 
absorb water or moisture.
b b t
it
In the linear range, assuming that the temperature and the concentration of water 
is uniform in the volume, we have:

• p
properties dependent of facesheets
p
p
properties:
p
p

Aij = Aij1 + Aij2
Cij = Cij1 + Cij2

Aij1j = ∑ k =1 ( Q 'ijj )k ( hk − hk −1 )

h 2
( Aij − Aij1 )
2
h
Dij = ( Cij2 − Cij1 )
2
Bij =

n1

Cij1 =

• properties dependent of core properties:

1 n1
Q 'ij )k ( hk2 − hk2−1 )

k =1 (
2

T
T
⎤ ⎡ε xxH ⎤ ⎡ε xxM ⎤ ⎡ε xx
⎤ ⎡ε xxH ⎤
⎡σ xx ⎤
⎡ε xx ⎤ ⎡ε xx
⎢ ⎥
⎢ ⎥ ⎢ T ⎥ ⎢ H⎥ ⎢ M⎥ ⎢ T ⎥ ⎢ H⎥
⎢ε yy ⎥ = ⎢ε yy ⎥ + ⎢ε yy ⎥ + ⎢ε yy ⎥ = ⎢ε yy ⎥ + ⎢ε yy ⎥ + [S ']⎢σ yy ⎥
T ⎥
⎢ H⎥ ⎢ M⎥ ⎢ T ⎥ ⎢ H⎥
⎢σ xy ⎥
⎢γ xy ⎥ ⎢γ xy
⎣ ⎦ ⎣ ⎦ ⎣γ xy ⎦ ⎣γ xy ⎦ ⎣γ xy ⎦ ⎣γ xy ⎦
⎣ ⎦

Fij = h ⋅ Cij′a

[ε ]

• in case of the symmetric sandwich (top and bottom facesheets are equal)

Aij1 = Aij2
Cij1 = −Cij2
107

⎤⎡ε xx0 ⎤
⎥⎢ 0 ⎥
⎥⎢ε yy ⎥
⎥⎢γ xy0 ⎥
⎥⎢ ⎥
⎥⎢ κ x ⎥
⎥⎢ κ y ⎥
⎥⎢ ⎥
0 ⎥⎢κ xy ⎥
F45 ⎥⎢γ yz0 ⎥
⎥⎢ ⎥
F55 ⎦⎥⎣⎢γ xz0 ⎦⎥
0
0
0
0
0

Aij = 2 Aij2

[ε ]
[ε ]
[ε ]

Dij = hC
h ij2

Bij = Cij = 0
108

total deformations

T

thermal deformations
thermal deformations

H

hydro deformations

M

mechanical deformations

HYDROTHERMAL ANALYSIS

HYDROTHERMAL ANALYSIS
UD

UD

⎡ ε 1 ⎤ ⎡ S11
⎢ε ⎥ = ⎢ S
⎢ 2 ⎥ ⎢ 12
⎢⎣ε 6 ⎥⎦ ⎢⎣ 0

S12
S 22
0

y

Off‐axis ply

In the material coordinates, the constitutive behavior is written as
,

2

0 ⎤ ⎡σ 1 ⎤ ⎡α 1 ⎤
⎡ β1 ⎤





0 ⎥ ⎢σ 2 ⎥ + ⎢α 2 ⎥ ΔT + ⎢⎢ β 2 ⎥⎥ Δc
⎢⎣ 0 ⎥⎦
S 66 ⎥⎦ ⎢⎣σ 6 ⎥⎦ ⎢⎣ 0 ⎥⎦

θ

⎡ ε1 ⎤ ⎡ S '11
⎢ε ⎥ = ⎢ S '
⎢ 2 ⎥ ⎢ 12
⎢⎣ε 6 ⎦⎥ ⎢⎣ S '16

with:
(α1, α2) coefficients of the thermal expansion in longitudinal and transversal 
directions (µm m‐1.K
directions (µm.m
K‐1 or 10‐6 K‐1)
ΔT variation of the temperature
(β1, β2) swelling coefficients (m.m
swelling coefficients (m m‐11.kg. kg
kg kg‐11)
Δc mass fraction od absorbed water (kg. kg‐1)
109

110

REFERENCES
French:
• Matériaux composites : comportement mécanique et analyse des structures, Jean‐Marie BERTHELOT, TEC et DOC –
2005
• Calcul et conception des structures composites, Pierre ODRU, Techniques de l’Ingénieur, A 7 792.
• Comportement élastique et viscoélastique des composites, par Yvon CHEVALIER, A 7 750.
• Critères de rupture des composites – Approche macroscopique, Yvon CHEVALIER, Techniques de l’Ingénieur, A 7 755.
• Matériaux
M té i
composites,
it Daniel
D i l GAY,
GAY Hermès
H
è Science
S i
P bli ti
Publications
– 2005
English:
• Greenhalgh, E.S. Failure analysis and fractigraphy of polymer composites, Woodhead Publishing Series in Composites
Science and Engineering No. 27, 2009, 608 pages.
• Daniel,
D i l I.M.,
I M Ishai,
I h i O.:
O Engineering
E i
i Mechanics
M h i off Composite
C
it Materials,
M t i l Oxford
O f d Univ.
U i Press,
P
1994
• D. Gay and S.V. Hoa, "Composite materials, Design and application", CRC Press, second edition, ISBN: 978‐1‐4200‐
4519‐2, (2007).
• E. Barbero, "Finite element analysis of composite materials", CRC Press, ISBN:978‐1‐4200‐5433‐0, (2008).
• J.
J N.
N Reddy.
Reddy An Introduction to Continuum Mechanics with Applications.
Applications Cambridge University Press,
Press New York,
York
2008.
• J.N. Reddy Theory and Analysis of elastic plates and Shells, 2nd ed., CRC Press
Free calculation tool:
• eLamX: Laminate theory,
theory Java,
Java [ABD] matrix,
matrix 3D failure envelope plots,
plots http:/ /tu‐dresden.de.
/tu dresden de

S '12
S '22
S '26

⎡ α1 ⎤
with ⎡α xx ⎤
⎢ ⎥
-1 ⎢

⎢α yy ⎥ = [R ][T ][R ] ⎢α 2 ⎥
⎢ ⎥
⎢⎣ 0 ⎥⎦
⎣α xy ⎦

⎡β xx ⎤
S '16 ⎤ ⎡ σ1 ⎤ ⎡α xx ⎤
⎢ ⎥
⎢ ⎥



S '26 ⎥ ⎢σ 2 ⎥ + ⎢α yy ⎥ ΔT + ⎢β yy ⎥ Δc
⎢β xy ⎥
S '66 ⎥⎦ ⎢⎣σ 6 ⎥⎦ ⎢⎣α xy ⎥⎦
⎣ ⎦
and

⎡β xx ⎤
⎡ β1 ⎤
⎢ ⎥
-1 ⎢

⎢β yy ⎥ = [R ][T ][R ] ⎢β 2 ⎥
⎢ ⎥
⎢⎣ 0 ⎥⎦
⎣β xy ⎦

Mechanics of Composite Materials

Technology of Polymers and Composites &
Engineering Mechanics

Dmytro
y Vasiukov
dmytro.vasiukov@mines‐‐douai.fr
dmytro.vasiukov@mines
111

x

MATHEMATICAL PRELIMINARIES

MATHEMATICAL PRELIMINARIES
vectors

vectors
Summation:

Vector in three‐dimensional space:

A = a1e1 + a 2e 2 + a 3e3

A = a1e1 + a2e 2 + a3e3
a1, a2 , a3 components

3

A = ∑ a je j
j=1

e1, e 2 , e3 basis vectors

A = a j e j = a k e k = a me m

dummy index

Scalar product (“dot product”):

A ⋅ B = ( Aieˆ i ) ⋅ ( B j eˆ j ) = Ai B j δijj = Ai Bi

When basics vector are constant, with fixed length and 
direction, the coordinate system is called Cartesian

⎧1, if i = j
δij ≡ ⎨
0 if i ≠ j
⎩ 0,

Vector product (“cross product”):

A × B = ( Aieˆ i ) × ( B j eˆ j ) = Ai B j δij = Ai Bi εijk eˆ k

When it is orthogonal, it is called rectangular Cartesian. 

0, for i = j ,or j = k , or k = i


εijk ≡ ⎨ 1,
1 for
f (i, j , k ) ∈ {(1,
(1 22,3),(2,3,1),(3,1,
3) (2 3 1) (3 1 2)}
⎪ −1, for (i, j , k ) ∈ {(1,3, 2),(3, 2,1),(2,1,3)}


( x, y , z )

( x1, x2 , x3 )
113

back to slides

114

STRESS TENSOR

back to slides

STRAIN‐DISPLACEMENT
tensors

kinematics

Stress vector

ΔF
Δ
F (nˆ )
ΔS →0 ΔS

t (nˆ ) = lim

Cauchy stress tensor and Cauchy stress formula

σ = σij eˆ ieˆ j

t (nˆ ) = nˆ ⋅ σ
Displacement vector

2nd order tensor or dyad

u=x−X

σ = σ11eˆ1eˆ1 + σ12eˆ1eˆ 2 + σ13eˆ1eˆ 3
+ σ 21eˆ 2eˆ1 + σ 22eˆ 2eˆ 2 + σ 23eˆ 2eˆ 3
+ σ31eˆ 3eˆ1 + σ32eˆ 3eˆ 2 + σ33eˆ 3eˆ 3
Double dot product:

Green‐Lagrange strain tensor:

1
E = ⎡⎣∇u + (∇u)T + ∇u ⋅ (∇u)T ⎤⎦
2

A : B = ( Aij eˆ ieˆ j ) : ( Bmneˆ meˆ n ) = Aij Bmn (eˆ j ⋅ eˆ m )(eˆ i ⋅ eˆ n ) =

Infinitesimal strain tensor:

115



J.N. Reddy Theory and Analysis of elastic plates and Shells, 2nd ed., CRC Press, 207, p. 303

| ∇u |<< 1

if

= Aij Bmn δ jmδin = Aij B ji = Amn Bnm
back to slides

116



∂u
∂u ∂u
1 ⎛ ∂u
E jk = ⎜ j + k + m m
2 ⎜⎝ ∂X k ∂X j ∂X j ∂X k

1
E ≈ ε = ⎣⎡∇u + (∇u)T ⎤⎦
2

1 ⎛ ∂u
∂u
ε jk = ⎜ j + k

2 ⎝ ∂xk ∂x j

J.N. Reddy Theory and Analysis of elastic plates and Shells, 2nd ed., CRC Press


⎟⎟



⎟⎟


back to slides

GENERELIZED HOOK’S LAW AND SYMETRY OF STIFFNESS

TRANSFORMATION RULES
for vectors

C ‐ stiffness 4th order tensor ,in general case has 

σ = C:ε

(3)^4=81
(3)
4 81 components. But independent ones are 
components But independent ones are
considerably less (symmetry of stress and strain 
tensors, existence of the strain energy). 
I h b
In the absence of body couples, the principle of the conservation of angular 
fb d
l
h
i i l f h
i
f
l
momentum leads to symmetry of the stress tensor: 

σij = Cijkl : ε kl

σij = σ ji

( )
p
6(3)^2=54 components

Cijkl

Strain tensor symmetrical by its definition:

eˆ′i = Rij eˆ j

eˆ i = R jieˆ ′j

ε kl = εlk

eˆ ′ = Reˆ ,

eˆ = R −1eˆ ′ = R T eˆ ′

Cijkl

6x6=36 components

Transformation rule:

Strain energy density function is invariant with respect to derivatives over strain:

∂U 0
σij =
= Cijkl : ε kl
∂εij
117



∂U 0
= Cijkl
∂εij ∂ε kl

Cijkl

21
21 components
t
back to slides

J.N. Reddy Theory and Analysis of elastic plates and Shells, 2nd ed., CRC Press

118

R ji ≡ cos(eˆ i , eˆ ′j )

Rij ≡ cos(eˆ ′i , eˆ j )
R ‐rotation matrix

⎡ eˆ1′ ⎤ ⎡ c s ⎤ ⎡ eˆ1 ⎤
⎢eˆ ′ ⎥ = ⎢ − s c ⎥ ⎢eˆ ⎥
⎢ 2⎥ ⎢
⎥⎢ 2⎥
⎢⎣ eˆ′3 ⎥⎦ ⎢⎣
1⎥⎦ ⎢⎣ eˆ 3 ⎥⎦

TRANSFORMATION RULES

UD COMPOSITES
for tensors

use of transformation rules
use of transformation rules

Transformation rule: σ′ij = Rik R jl σ kl

2
s2
2 sc ⎤
⎡ σ1 ⎤ ⎡ c
⎢ σ ⎥ = ⎢ s 2 c 2 −2 sc ⎥

⎢ 2⎥ ⎢
⎢⎣ τ12 ⎥⎦ ⎢⎢ − sc sc c 2 − s 2 ⎥⎥



σ

Contracted notation: σ′p = T pq σq
ε

σ

−1

ε′p = T pq ε q
ε

( p, q = 1...6)

⎡ σx ⎤
⎢ ⎥
⎢σy ⎥
⎢ τ xy ⎥
⎣ ⎦

T





⎜ T pq ⎟ = ⎜ T pq ⎟




⎡ c2 s2 0
⎢ 2
c2 0
⎢s
⎢ 0
σ
0 1
T =⎢
0 0
⎢ 0
⎢ 0
0 0

⎢⎣ − sc sc 0
119

back to slides

0
0
0

c
s
0

2 sc ⎤

0
−2 sc ⎥
0
0 ⎥

−s
0 ⎥
c
0 ⎥⎥
0 c 2 − s 2 ⎥⎦
0

c = cos θ

⎡ c2
s2
⎢ 2
c2
⎢ s
⎢ 0
ε
0
T =⎢
0
⎢ 0
⎢ 0
0

⎢⎣ −2 sc 2 sc

s = sin θ

0 0
0 0
1 0
0 c
0 s
0 0

⎡ ε1 ⎤ ⎡ 1 / E1
⎢ ε ⎥ = ⎢ −ν / E
⎢ 2 ⎥ ⎢ 21 2
⎢⎣ γ12 ⎥⎦ ⎢⎣
0

sc ⎤

0
− sc ⎥
0
0 ⎥

−s
0 ⎥
c
0 ⎥⎥
0 c 2 − s 2 ⎥⎦
0

back to slides

−ν12 / E1
1 / E2
0

2
s2
− sc ⎤
⎡ εx ⎤ ⎡ c

⎢ ⎥ ⎢ 2
c2
sc ⎥
⎢ εy ⎥ = ⎢ s
2
2⎥
⎢ ⎥ ⎢
⎣ γ xy ⎦ ⎣⎢ 2 sc −2 sc c − s ⎦⎥

120

0 ⎤ ⎡ σ1 ⎤
0 ⎥ ⎢ σ2 ⎥
⎥⎢ ⎥
1 / G12 ⎥⎦ ⎢⎣ τ12 ⎥⎦
⎡ ε1 ⎤
⎢ε ⎥
⎢ 2⎥
⎢⎣ γ12 ⎥⎦
back to slides

MICROMECHANICS
Review of models:
• Voigt 
• Reuss
• Hill theorem
• Bounding theorem
• The dilute approximation
h dil
i
i
• The Composite sphere assemblage
• The self‐consistent scheme 
Concentric Cylinder Assemblage (CCA) Model
l d
bl
(
)
d l







Generalized self‐consistent scheme 
Differential scheme
Mori‐Tanaka theory 
Eshelby inclusion model
Numerical methods
S
Square and hexagonal packing
dh
l
ki

• Introduced by Hashin
Introduced by Hashin and Rosen
and Rosen
• Suitable for transverse isotropic materials
• 4 out of five material constants 



121 •

Z Hashin, BW Rosen. The elastic moduli of fibre‐reinforced materials. J. Appl. Mech. 1964, Vol. 31, pp. 223‐232.
h
h l
d l ffb
f
d
l
l
h
l
RM Christensen. Mechanics of Composite Materials. Krieger Publishing Company, Florida, 1991.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Micro‐mechanics_of_failure
Jacob Aboudi, Steven M. Arnold, Brett A. Bednarcyk Micromechanics of Composite Materials: 
A Generalized Multiscale Analysis Approach. 2013

back to slides


Documents similaires


Fichier PDF 2017 tp comp guillouroux huret 2
Fichier PDF 2017 tp comp guillouroux huret 1
Fichier PDF 2018 tp comp article bedjiaht frouinb bauerg
Fichier PDF materials testing online
Fichier PDF massmaterials com
Fichier PDF lecture notes mdc2014


Sur le même sujet..