Order of Battle .pdf



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Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Order of
Battle
Credits

Contents
2

New Rules

3

Motor Torpedo Boats

8

Admirals

11

Advanced Aircraft Operations

15

Editor

Scenarios

22

Hunting the Beast

27

Cover

Expanded Fleet List

34

Royal Navy

35

Kriegsmarine

58

United States Navy

64

Japan

74

Italian

88

French

95

Soviet Union

100

Civilian Ships

110

Counters

112

Erik Nicely

Developers

Richard L. Bax, Agis Neugebauer, Erik Nicely
Wulf Corbett, David Manley

Nick Robinson

Chris Quilliams

Interior Illustrations

Sherard Jackson, Danilo Moretti, Mike Mumah

Miniatures Gaming Manager
Ian Barstow

Print Manager
Ed Russell

Special Thanks

Adam Gulwell, Peter Swarbrick of www.shipspictures.co.uk
and David Page of www.navyphotos.co.uk

Order of Battle (C) 2007 Mongoose Publishing. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this work by any means
without the written permission of the publisher is expressly forbidden. All significant art and text herein
are copyrighted by Mongoose Publishing. No portion of this work may be reproduced in any form without
written permission. This material is copyrighted under the copyright laws of the UK. Printed in the UK.

1
Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Contents

Introduction

Lead Developer

Introduction
Victory at Sea had a humble beginning as a bare-bones set of free rules in Mongoose Publishing’s Signs and Portents online
magazine. That initial free rules set proved to be popular and led to the development of the core rulebook, which was an
immediate success. A loyal international fan base developed as Victory at Sea quickly earned itself a place as one of the ‘standards’
of World War II naval wargaming. The rulebook covered the basics of naval warfare in all theatres, but only so much would fit
within its pages.
This supplement is an expansion for Victory at Sea. Changes for some of the rules and stat blocks from the original rulebook
have been made in an attempt to increase historical accuracy. Player concerns that have come up on Mongoose Publishing’s
online forum have been addressed as well. New rules are introduced to cover many aspects of WWII naval combat that were not
addressed in the core rulebook and air combat has been expanded and, of course, there are new ships. With the expanded fleet
lists, players have the resources to play any historical battle as well as the option to build better fleets for ‘what if ’ games.

Introduction

This book was a collaborative effort that couldn’t have been done without the input of the original Salty Seadogs playtest group.
Many thanks to David Manley and Rich Bax, whose fleet lists form a large portion of this book. I would be remiss not to thank
Agis Neubauer as well for his excellent work on the German Z-Plan ships. The newer playtesters proved their worth; Dan Martz
and Darell Phillips gave many suggestions and often acted as my ‘conscience’ when I wanted to blow through a rule in order to
get to the next one, and I received good feedback from the other new guys. My personal gaming group at Game Towne in San
Diego deserves mention - thanks ‘dudes’. Thanks to Matthew Sprange for giving me the opportunity to work on this project, and
to my wife Amber for putting up with my occasional loud rants while putting it all together.

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Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

New Rules
This chapter details some changes to the main Victory at Sea rulebook, and adds many new options for budding admirals to try
in their games. These additional rules are by no means necessary to enjoy a good battle, but you will find they add a degree of
realism and will provide you with many new tactical choices within a game.

Official Rules Changes for Victory at Sea

These are official changes to the Victory at Sea rulebook, adding a little more realism to the game and streamlining play.
Moving: A ship must move half of its current Speed (not maximum Speed) before it can execute a turn.
Flank Speed!: This Special Action increases a ship’s movement by 1”. There is no modifier to Attack Dice on ships that have
executed a Flank Speed! Special Action.
Attacking: There is a +1 bonus to all Attack Dice for all turret and secondary weapons to any target within 10” unless the target
is obscured by smoke. Secondary Armaments ignore the -1 Attack Dice penalties when attacking vessels moving 7” or more.
Torpedo Belts: Torpedo Belts only give protection to side hits - hits to fore and aft score damage normally. For every hit a
Torpedo scores on the side of a ship with the Torpedo Belt trait, roll one dice. On a 4 or more, the Belt itself has been hit and
the Attack Dice be re-rolled.

Torpedo Attacks, Tubes and Reloads: No torpedo attacks may be made by a ship in the same turn that it executes an Evasive!
Special Action.
Torpedo reloads for submarines in all navies are limited to one extra salvo (two shots total). Cruisers of the Imperial Japanese Navy with
Slow Loading torpedoes have reloads for two extra salvoes (three shots total) while Japanese destroyers with Slow Loading torpedoes
are limited to one extra salvo (two shots). The Slow Loading Special trait as described in Victory at Sea remains unaffected.
Torpedo tubes will be treated as turrets when applying damage results due to being Crippled. They may never be fired through
smoke.
In addition, all damage scored on civilian vessels by torpedoes is automatically doubled.
Observation Aircraft: Observation Aircraft are no longer represented on the tabletop during games, unless being used in an ASW
capacity, and do not affect combat or Initiative. The Aircraft Special Trait may not be eliminated when a ship becomes Crippled (it
is assumed that the ship has its planes in the air at the start of the battle).
Observation Aircraft do not affect the launching/owning ship’s Attack Dice and
do not provide an Initiative bonus. They may be outfitted for Anti Submarine
Warfare as detailed on page 16. For further uses of Observation Aircraft see the
Hunting the Beast chapter, page 29.
Smoke: Ships may fire through Smoke created by friendly vessels with the following restrictions: the ships firing must have the
Radar trait, normal range penalties apply to the friendly firing ships, no AD bonus is given to ships within 10”, anti-aircraft fire
from friendly ships is subject to a -1 penalty to AAA Attack Dice, and torpedoes may not be fired through smoke. The rules
for the automatic Command Check, placing and removing Smoke Counters, and enemy targeting through Smoke as stated in
Victory at Sea remain the same.

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Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

New Rules

Weak: Weak weapons incur a -1 modifier to all Damage Dice rolls, and only inflict Critical Hits on targets with an Armour score
of 3 or less. Critical effects remain the same, but only one extra point of Crew and/or Damage may be lost due to a Critical Hit
from a Weak weapon.

New Advanced Rules

The Victory at Sea rulebook presents the basic rules for playing the naval battles of World War II. The following offer an
added level of realism (and lethality) to games, and players should consider them to be Advanced Rules to be used after they are
comfortable with the basics.

Shorelines, Islands and Shallow Water

Dry land on the Victory at Sea gaming table can be denoted by table edges, lines drawn on the table or artistically produced
terrain pieces. Dry land, however represented, will take the form of shorelines and islands. Whether land obstructs line of sight
or not should be determined before play begins via common agreement or a scenario-specific rule.
No ship with a starting Damage score of 6 or more can come within 1” of Land without running aground. The exception to this
are any areas designated as being a harbour, where all ships are permitted to move.
Ships running aground may not fire any weapons or execute any Special Actions, launch or recover aircraft, and their Speed is
reduced to 0 for the rest of the game. Attack Dice gain a +2 bonus against beached ships.

Shore Batteries

Shore batteries in Victory at Sea represent artillery pieces employed against naval vessels. The size and number of shore batteries
used against ships varied greatly and the rules below will allow players to include them in scenarios.

New Rules

Shore batteries are considered immobile ships for game purposes. They can vary greatly in their capabilities but all can be
expressed in game terms using the following guidelines:
Main Guns: All shore batteries are equipped with these. All have a range and AD based on size and number of guns, DD, and
some will have the Weak, AP, or Super AP traits.
Guns
Less than 6” guns
6”-8” guns
10” guns
12” guns
14” guns
15” guns
16” guns

Range
12”
26”
22”
26”
28”
30”
40”

AD
1 per 4 barrels
1 per 2 barrels
1 per barrel
1 per barrel
1 per barrel
1 per barrel
1 per barrel

DD
1
1
1
1
2
2
2

Traits
Weak




AP
AP
Super AP

Target Score: As Shore Batteries are hard to detect and hit, they all have a Target value of 5+.
Armour: Open Gun: 4+, Shielded Gun: 5+, Hardened Gun (such as the “Atlantic Wall” batteries): 6+. The default armour for
all shore batteries is 5+.
Damage: 5 per Gun AD. -1 if the guns are weak, +1 if they are AP or Super AP.
Priority Level:
Guns
4 AD or Less
5-8 AD
9-12 AD
13+ AD
Hardened Gun
10”-12” Guns
14”-15” Guns
16” Guns

Priority Level
Patrol
Skirmish
Raid
Battle
Raise Priority Level by one
Raise Priority Level by one
Raise Priority Level by two
Raise Priority Level by three

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Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Crew: Coastal batteries have no Crew score.
Critical Hits: Critical Hits are determined normally but the results are determined on the following table;
D6
1
2
3
4
5
6

Damage
+1
+3
+3
+4
+4
-

Effect
All guns suffer -1 penalty on Attack Dice
One random Gun is destroyed
Each Gun can only fire on a 4+
No weapons can fire for 1D3 turns
Roll for each Gun, on a 4+ it is destroyed
Damage score to zero, entire battery destroyed

Example Batteries
Open 6” Coastal Defence Battery
Armour: 4+

Target: 5+

Weapon
8x 6” Guns

Patrol

Damage: 20

Range
26

AD
4

DD
1

Special


Hardened 15” Coastal Battery with 4 Guns
Armour: 6+

Target: 5+

Range
30
30
30
30

AD
1
1
1
1

DD
2
2
2
2

Special
AP
AP
AP
AP

Night Fighting

In the battles for supremacy of the oceans in World War II, conflicts happened night and day. Some of those battles, such as the
Japanese attack on Savor Island, were an exercise in superior night fighting tactics. Whether a sneak attack or a brave defence
of coastal assets, night-time battles were an aspect of war at sea that tested the worth of many naval commanders. In games of
Victory at Sea target acquisition, whether by radar or other means, is the most important factor for engaging enemy ships.
Illuminated Targets: Ships that are Illuminated are automatically spotted by all ships within 20”. Any fire at an Illuminated
ship ignores Attack Dice modifiers for night; the target is treated as if it were being engaged in daylight. However, the maximum
range of 20” remains.
Secondary Armament: Secondary Armament fired during night battles Illuminates the firing vessel. All ships within 10” of a
ship firing Secondary Armament at night will automatically detect it.
Searchlights: Any ship may Illuminate one enemy ship within 10”. Ships actively using searchlights are also considered to be
Illuminated and become legal targets for enemy fire. Searchlights are used at the start of the Attack Phase, before any shooting
takes place. The player who lost the Initiative declares all of his searchlights first, followed by his opponent.
Starshells: Starshells are fired by guns from the ship’s Secondary Armament, using 1AD (so ships with only 1 AD of Secondary
Armament must choose between starshell use and a normal attack).
Starshells can be fired to any point within range of the ship’s secondary armament (place an Starshell marker at the desired
location) with no Attack Dice rolls needed. All ships within 3” of a starshell marker are Illuminated. Starshell markers are
removed in the End Phase.

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Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

New Rules

Weapon
Gun #1 (15”)
Gun #2 (15”)
Gun #3 (15”)
Gun #4 (15”)

Battle

Damage: 24

Radar (1943 or earlier): Ships with radar firing at night must shoot at the largest enemy ship within range (the ship with the
greatest number of starting Damage) . If two vessels with the same starting Damage are present, the nearest will be attacked.
Fire control systems had advanced after 1943 to allow more effective direction of fire, so there are no limitations on radar in night
games set in that year or later.

Minefields

The use of mines against ocean going vessels was an effective means of hemming in enemy ships or denying them passage. Besides
being able to cripple or sink ships (both civilian and military), valuable naval assets could be tied up for long periods of time in
minesweeping operations.
Placement and Density
Minefields are placed before play begins, paid for using the table below.
Minefield Density
10
11
12
13
14

Fleet Allocation Point Cost
1 Patrol point
2 Patrol points
1 Skirmish point
2 Skirmish points
1 Raid point

New Rules

The player deploying the minefields must then divide the playing area into 12”x12” squares. The player using mines must then
record which squares contain mines.
Before play begins, the opposing player rolls 1 dice for each square. On a 4 or more, the minelaying player must declare whether
he has placed mines in that square or not.
Navigating a Minefield
Any ship in a square designated as a Minefield must roll one dice at the beginning of its movement. On a 5 or 6 the ship
encounters a mine. Roll another dice, this time adding the ship’s Crew Quality and Target score. If this equals or exceeds the
Minefield Density, it avoids the mine and may move normally. If the roll is lower than the Minefield Density, a mine has struck,
and the ship suffers a 3DD AP hit that is treated as a torpedo for damage purposes – however, Torpedo Belts are ineffective
against mines.
Minesweeping
Mine squares may be cleared by minesweeping vessels. To do so, a minesweeper must begin its movement within the square. A
Command Check with a target number of 8+ must be made and, if successful, the Minefield Density in that square is reduced
by one (to a minimum Minefield Density of 10). This change to Minefield Density is immediate and any ships moving after the
minesweeper in the same Movement Phase benefit from the reduction.
If the Command Check is failed, the minesweeper immediately encounters
a mine and must immediately try to avoid it as detailed above.
Any friendly ship within 6” behind a minesweeper gains a +1 bonus when
trying to avoid a mine.
No Special Actions may be used by a minesweeper while it is engaged in
minesweeping, and any ship following the minesweeper loses its +1 bonus
to avoid mines if it does so.

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Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Generic Minesweeper
Speed: 4”
Turning: 3
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 3/1
Crew: 4/2

Weapon
AA
Length: 150 ft.

Patrol
Special Traits: Agile, Minesweeper
In Service: 1939

Range
5
Displacement: 750 tons

AD
1

DD

Speed: 20 kts.

Special

Crew: 100

Suicide Attacks

The suicide attacks of Japanese Special Attack Units (called tokubetsu kõgeki tai) became known as kamikaze (‘divine wind’) due
to inaccurate translation by the Allies. Japanese kamikaze attacks sunk 81 American ships and damaged another 195. Thousands
of Japanese pilots died doing this.
Suicide attacks may be attempted only by four specific aircraft and one submersible of the Imperial Japanese Navy. Additionally
they are restricted to games set in 1944 and later.
If a battle is not specified as being set in any particular year kamikaze use will follow scenario guidelines for submersibles and
aircraft. The one-way missions of the Imperial Japanese Navy’s surface vessels (such as Yamato’s last engagement) made as Allied
fleets came closer and closer to the Japanese home islands are outside the scope of these rules.

Aircraft listed as kamikaze on the Aircraft roster count as being suicide attackers as soon as the force using them is deployed.
Aircraft performing suicide attacks may only defend in a dogfight and may never initiate one.
Zero and Judy flights used for kamikaze attacks must be designated and declared as such before the Initiative Phase of the first
turn of the game. Kamikaze pilots gave up their lives by the thousands; no Command check is required for suicide attacks but
the plane or submersible may not make the attack unless it is declared in the Movement Phase.
Movement
Flights designated as Kamikaze move as normal. The Kaiten submersible moves up to 7” in the turn it was launched but may
make no Special Actions until the Movement Phase in the turn after it was launched.
Attacking
Craft making suicide attacks must move into base contact with their targets. The suicide
attack is resolved before other attacks but after all AA fire, subjecting aircraft to intense
defensive firing. The defending ship gains a +1 bonus to AA Attack Dice when firing at
aircraft making suicide attacks.
The Kaiten resolves its first attack in the End Phase in which it was launched or as normal
for suicide attacks in consecutive turns.
Craft listed as Kamikaze may use their AD and DD in suicide attacks only - the Ki-115, Okha, and Kaiten have no other means
of attacking besides suicide attacks. A Zero or Judy flight making a suicide attack is treated as having a 3 AD, 2 DD, Weak
attack.
If any suicide attack by an aircraft successfully causes damage, roll one dice. On a 4 or more, a fire will be started.
Once a suicide attack is made, the flight is destroyed whether it was successful in damaging the target or not. The Kaiten will
not be automatically destroyed by a suicide attack if it misses its target.

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Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

New Rules

The four aircraft useable with these rules are the Yokosuka D4Y ‘-Judy dive bombers, the Mitsubishi A6M Zero, the Nakajima
Ki-115 Tsurgi, and the Yokosuka MXY7 Okha. There was one kamikaze submersible used in the war, the Kaiten manned
torpedo.

Motor Torpedo Boats
One of the most romantic, dashing and potentially hazardous duties in the navies of the Second World War was to serve in within
the Coastal Forces (abbreviated here to CF). Many navies showed a passing interest in motor torpedo boats during the 1930s,
with designs offered by Britain and Germany being exported to several European countries and further afield. The US developed
a later interest, eventually settling on standard designs from indigenous design houses and from the UK.

Motor Torpedo Boats

When war broke out the utility of small craft to take the fight to the enemy in the ‘narrow seas’ was quickly realised; Germany
built up considerable numbers of their famous Lurrsen-designed ‘Schnellboote’, or S-Boats (although these were often known to
the Allies as E-Boats, or ‘Enemy Boats’. After a few false starts, the Royal Navy built hundreds of Motor Torpedo Boats (MTBs)
and Motor Gun Boats (MGBs), with the most prevalent designs coming from Vospers, Camper & Nicholson and Fairmile.
The US standard PT Boats were to become a familiar sight in the Mediterranean and the Pacific, while the Italians built many
fast, light and successful MAS craft. The main fighting units were supported by a myriad of gunboats, defence launches, motor
minesweepers, minelayers and coastal transports.
Coastal Forces actions tended to be fought at night so as to avoid enemy aircraft (to which they were horribly vulnerable), against
enemy convoys. Flotillas or squadrons would lie silently in wait (‘lying doggo’ as the British would have it) or creep up quietly in
the darkness before unleashing their torpedoes at the closest possible point, then opening up the throttles to tear through or away
from the enemy. Duels would be fought between the coastal boats and convoy escorts, often consisting of converted trawlers and
destroyer escorts. Coastal boats also fought several battles against enemy fleet units and other ‘heavies’. Notable successes (and
failures) include British MTBs attacking the German raider ‘Stier’ (the raider escaped but two of her destroyer escorts were sunk),
US PT Boats at the battle of Leyte Gulf, and Italian MAS boats operating against British convoys in the Mediterranean, during
which MAS boats hit and crippled HMS Manchester (she was later scuttled).
These boats were heavily armed with rapid firing guns, from light machine guns up to 40mm cannon. Some even carried
automatic 6pdr and 4.5” guns. This array of weaponry could put out devastating weights of firepower which posed a real threat to
other CF craft and to smaller escorts. Their armament was not much of a threat to larger vessels as they were more concerned by
the heavy torpedo armament that was often embarked; torpedo boats packed two, sometimes four heavyweight ‘fish’. Later in the
war, more unusual weapons began to be fitted, with German and US boats in particular sporting various rocket-based weaponry.
The Royal Navy did not use these, favouring the development of high explosive shells fired from automatic guns.
CF boats were also not lacking in technical development. Small radar sets were developed for use in boats of the US Navy and
Royal Navy which proved to be extremely useful in visualising and controlling night-time battles. In the early days of the CF use
of radar, it was common for a radar-equipped boat or escort to accompany a force of radar-blind vessels in order to vector them
in for a successful attack, and then to guide them out to safety. German use of radar was limited to a few S-Boats; other navies
did not deploy radar on their small craft until after the war.

CF Vessels in Victory at Sea

Coastal forces vessels are represented in Victory at Sea in a similar manner to
aircraft. A CF counter represents a section of two boats. They manoeuvre like
aircraft, so have no Turn score (unless indicated). A flotilla or squadron will
comprise 2-4 stands of boats. The exceptions are larger coastal vessels such as
armed trawlers (and the German equivalent, the VP Boat) and large landing
craft. These are represented individually, and are identified in the data tables
as having numerical Armour scores rather than the entry ‘Sp’. They also have
a Target score of 6.
Coastal Forces craft can only be engaged by a ship’s Secondary Armament and AA weapons. Larger guns cannot train effectively
on these small targets. Attacking CF vessels follows the same basic principles as firing at other targets, with the following
exceptions.

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Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Armour and Target Scores

These are combined in the following special rule. A hit represents
effective fire hitting within the formation rather than hits on the
vessels themselves. The effect of this fire may be to damage the boats,
force them to break off an engagement, or both. For each hit scored,
roll a dice and consult the table below.
1-3 – The stand is driven off. It cannot fire torpedoes this turn and
must make its next move at maximum speed directly away from the
attacker.
4 – As above, plus the stand takes 1 point of Damage
5-6 – The stand takes 1 point of Damage, but it may still fire
torpedoes (coolness under fire!)
Stands are removed from play once their Damage is reduced to 0. For simplicity, stands do not have thresholds or Crew to worry
about.

Depth Charge Attacks

British Coastal Forces developed a tactic whereby they dropped depth charges close to enemy vessels in the hope the underwater
explosions would damage the ship.

Smoke Screens

All British MTBs and MGBs, US PT Boats, German S Boats and R Boats carried smoke dischargers or smoke floats. These allow
a stand to deploy a smoke screen using the standard smoke rules. Each section can do this only once per game.

Coastal Forces Data Tables

The following table summarises the statistics for costal forces vessels and other ships that fought in the Narrow Seas. All use the
special Armour and Target rules above unless there is a value in the Armour column, in which case they use the normal rules.
Torpedoes: AD/DD/X/Y : X = A if AP, otherwise -, Y = ‘R’ if 1 reload, ‘O’ if One-Shot
Example: 2/4/A/R = 2 Attack Dice, 4 Damage Dice, AP trait, 1 Reload
Sec X”: Secondary Armament, range X”. All Secondary Armament is 1 AD, 1 DD, Weak
Roc X”: Rocket Armament instead of torpedoes may be carried. Range X”, 1 AD, 2 DD, One-Shot
DC: Carried Depth Charges. Range 0”. All are One-Shot
Priority Level: The Fleet Allocation Point cost shows how many stands are available for each Patrol point. For example Patrol/2
means one Patrol point will buy two stands.

MTB Table
Type
USA
PT Boat
Elco MGB
LCP/LCVP
LCM

Speed

Turn

Target

Armour

Damage Traits

Torps

AA

Other

FAP cost

8”
8”
3”
3”

AA
AA
AA
AA

5+
5+
5+
5+

Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp

3
3
2
2






4/4/A/O




5/1
5/2



Roc 6”




Patrol/2
Patrol/3
Patrol/4
Patrol/4

SC-1
SC-497 (fast)
SC-497 (slow)

4”
5”
3”

AA
AA
AA

5+
5+
5+

Sp
Sp
Sp

3
3
3









5/1
5/1
5/1

Sec 8”
Roc 6”
Roc 6”

Patrol/2
Patrol/2
Patrol/2

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Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Motor Torpedo Boats

To conduct a Depth Charge attack, the stand must be moved into contact with the target vessel. It may then conduct an attack in the
Attack Phase - roll a dice. On a 4 or more the attack is successful. Treat the target as if it has been hit by a 6DD, AP attack.

Motor Torpedo Boats

Type
UK
Vosper 72’ MTB
Vosper 61’ MTB
Vosper 73’ MGB
Vosper 73’ MTB
Elco MTB
Fairmile “A” ML
Fairmile “B” ML
Fairmile “C” MGB
Fairmile “D” MTB
Denny SGB
70’ MGB
70’ MA/SB
BPB MTB
C & N MTB
Thorneycroft MTB
White 72’ MTB
Landing Craft Gun
Armed Trawler
Germany
S-Boat (S1-S25)
S-Boat (S26+)
R1
R17/R25/R41
VP Boat
Italy
MAS boat
MAS 438
MAS 427
MS boat
Japan
PT1
PT10
PT101
T35
Hayabusa
Daihatsu
France
VTB 8
CH.1
CH.5
Soviet Union
D3
G5
MO-4

Speed Turn Target

Armour

Damage Traits

Torps

AA

Other

FAP cost

8”
8”
8”
8”
8”
5”
4”
4”
8”
7”
8”
7”
8”
7”
8”
8”
3”
3”

AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
2
2

5+
5+
5+
5+
5+
5+
5+
5+
5+
5+
5+
5+
5+
5+
5+
5+
5+
4+

Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp
4+
4+

3
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
3
3
3
3
2
2

-------------------

2/4/A/O
2/3/-/O
-4/3/-/O
2/4/A/O
---2/4/A/O
2/4/A/O
--2/3/-/O
4/3/-/O
2/3/-/O
2/3/-/O
---

5/1
5/1
5/1
5/1
5/1
5/1
5/1
5/2
5/1
5/1
5/1
5/1
5/1
5/1
5/1
5/1
5/2
5/1

DC

Sec 4”
Sec 4”
Sec 6”
Sec 4”
DC
DC
DC
DC
DC
Sec 10”
Sec 6”

Patrol/2
Patrol/2
Patrol/3
Patrol/2
Patrol/2
Patrol/3
Patrol/3
Patrol/3
Patrol/2
Patrol/2
Patrol/3
Patrol/3
Patrol/2
Patrol/2
Patrol/2
Patrol/2
Patrol/3
Patrol/3

7”
8”
4”
4”
3”

AA
AA
AA
AA
2

5+
5+
5+
5+
4+

Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp
4+

3
3
3
3
2

------

2/4/A/O
2/4/A/R
----

5/1
5/1
5/1
5/1
5/1

Roc 4”**
DC
DC
Sec 6”, DC

Patrol/2
Patrol/1
Patrol/3
Patrol/3
Patrol/3

9”
7”
6”
8”

AA
AA
AA
AA

5+
5+
5+
5+

Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp

3
2
2
3

-----

2/3/-/O
2/3/-/O
2/3/-/O
2/4/A/R

5/1
5/1
5/1
5/1

Sec 8”
Sec 8”
DC

Patrol/2
Patrol/2
Patrol/2
Patrol/1

8”
6”
8”
7”
7”
3”

AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA

5+
5+
5+
5+
5+
5+

Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp

2
2
2
3
3
3

-----

2/3/-/O
2/3/-/O
2/3/-/O
2/3/-/O
---

5/1
5/1
5/1
5/1
5/1
5/1

8”
4”
3”

AA
AA
AA

5+
5+
5+

Sp
Sp
Sp

3
3
3

----

2/3/-/O
---

5/1
5/1
5/1

DC
Sec 8”
Sec 8”

8”
8”
5”

AA
AA
AA

5+
5+
5+

Sp
Sp
Sp

2
3
3

----

2/3/-/O
2/4/A/O
--

4/1
5/1
5/2

Patrol/2
Roc 4”, DC ** Patrol/1
Sec 6”
Patrol/3

Notes
** S Boats may carry rockets in scenarios set in 1945 only.
** G5 can only carry Depth Charges if torpedoes are removed.

10
Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Sec 6”

Patrol/2
Patrol/2
Patrol/2
Patrol/2
Patrol/3
Patrol/4
Patrol/2
Patrol/3
Patrol/3

Admirals
Throughout the history of naval warfare, individuals given command have distinguished themselves in combat. Every fleet needs
a commanding officer and many have risen above and beyond the call of duty to sail into victory. World War II was no exception,
and battles at sea were driven by men that will go down in history as heroes of their respective nations.
In Victory at Sea, Admirals are defined as officers commanding a group
of vessels whether they held the rank of admiral or not. Players may either
use one of the profiles of the selected historic commanders below or create
their own for campaigns and one-off battles. Only one Admiral per fleet is
allowed, even in campaigns.
Admirals may be purchased for any fleet of five or more Fleet Allocation
Points, and will be assigned to one vessel. They raise the Priority Level of
this flagship by one. A Raid level ship with an Admiral on board therefore
becomes a Battle level ship, for example. All Admirals provide +2 bonus to
all Initiative rolls for their fleet, until the flagship’s Crew score is reduced
zero or it is destroyed.
The flagships listed for the historic Admirals are guidelines only and players
may place them on different ships if they wish, though they may only serve
in their native fleets.

Three traits from the following list may be given to an Admiral and are chosen before play begins. The effects of the Admiral
traits remain in play until the flagship is destroyed or reduced to zero Crew.
Night Fighter: This Admiral has drilled and fought extensively using specialised night fighting tactics. In night battles any ship
in this Admiral’s fleet attempting to spot enemy vessels gains a +2 bonus.
Fearless: There is a rare breed of men that seize the moment and effectively turn overwhelming odds into a fighting chance for
victory. A Fearless Admiral grants a +1 bonus to the Attack Dice of all ships in his fleet if the opposing fleet is larger by 3 or more
Fleet Allocation Points. The Fleet Allocation Point difference is calculated at the beginning of a battle and may not be gained
due to losses in combat.
Torpedo School Graduate: Well-trained in the use of torpedoes, this Admiral can use them with deadly efficiency. Any ship in
a fleet with a Torpedo School graduate will never re-roll successful torpedo hits.
Hunter of the Deep: This Admiral is a seasoned veteran of submarine warfare, venerated by his compatriots and feared by his
enemies. Once a game, the Admiral may declare a combined attack at the start of a turn – throughout this turn, all submarines
in his fleet may re-roll any Attack Dice that fail to cause damage.
Tactical Genius: Endowed with superior training, combat experience, and an uncanny ability to guess an opponent’s next move,
the Tactical Genius bestows a +3 to Initiative instead of the normal +2.
Defensive Tactician: An Admiral that knows when to avoid a battle to win a war can be a blessing to the navy of any nation.
Special missions may be given to skilled commanders as well. All ships in a Defensive Tactician’s fleet may use the Evasive! Special
Action, not counting it towards the one Special Action per turn limit, once per battle.

11
Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Admirals

Admiral Traits

Carrier Commander: This Admiral knows the value of the aircraft under his command and realises that they will change the face
of naval warfare. Friendly ships with the Carrier trait may launch or recover four flights per turn rather than the normal two.
Strike Commander: A skilled fleet Admiral that can exploit stealth, surprise, and knowledge of ground defenses may go down in
history as a butcher or a hero. Once a game, the Admiral may declare a combined attack at the start of a turn – throughout this
turn, all aircraft in his fleet may re-roll any Attack Dice that fail to cause damage.
Invulnerable: Having trained the men under his command to keep their ships afloat at
all costs, the invulnerable Admiral can fight on when he should by all rights be at the
bottom of the ocean. All ships in this Admiral’s fleet receive a +1 bonus to all Command
checks for Damage Control and Firefighting.
Master of the High Seas: Born to wind and water, this Admiral’s orders result in
maneuvering that can leave enemy captains exposed and outmaneuvered. All ships in
the fleet may use Come About or Flank Speed Special Actions, not counting them
toward the one Special Action per turn limit, once per battle.
Commerce Raider: Though viewed as a heartless killer by his targets, the Commerce
Raider is an effective component in a nation’s war machine. Once a game, the Admiral
may declare a combined attack at the start of a turn – throughout this turn, all ships
of 5 points of Damage or less in his fleet may re-roll any Attack Dice that fail to cause
damage.

Admirals

Historic Admirals
Commander Ernest Evans
United States Navy

Commander Evans was a full-blooded Cherokee Indian who
entered service with the US Navy in 1931. He commanded both
the Clemson-class destroyer Alden (earning the Bronze Star while
commanding) and the Fletcher-class Johnston. At the Battle off
Samar (Leyte Gulf ) as a part of the unit Taffy 3, Evans heroically
charged an oncoming Japanese fleet in an attempted diversion so
the valuable carriers in his group could escape. His tiny destroyer
crippled the Japanese cruisers Kumano and Suzuya and then fought
on after his ship took heavy fire, inspiring the other commanders
in Taffy 3. His actions led in part to the successful withdrawal
of the aircraft carriers in his force. Though not an admiral, he
inspired the ships in his group to fight against impossible odds.
Commander Evans paid the ultimate price at Leyte, and his body
was never recovered. He was posthumously awarded the Medal of
Honor and shared in the Presidential Unit Citation awarded to
Taffy 3.
Traits: Fearless, Tactical Genius, Invulnerable
Flagship: Fletcher-class destroyer Johnston

12
Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Rear Admiral Sir Henry Harwood
Royal Navy

Entering the Royal Navy in 1903, Sir Henry had a long and distinguished career.
The HMS Warwick was his first command. He served as captain of two other
vessels before having a flag command on HMS Ajax. While commanding Force
G, Harwood fought at the Battle of the River Plate. Brilliant tactics executed by
Admiral Harwood and his fellow captains led to the pursuit and eventual scuttling
of the pocket battleship Admiral Graf Spee. Harwood was knighted and appointed
Commander-in-Chief, Mediterranean Station in 1942. His decorations included the
Order of the British Empire and Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath.
Admiral Harwood retired in 1945.
Traits: Tactical Genius, Master of the High Seas, Defensive Tactician
Flagship: Leander class cruiser HMS Ajax

Vice Admiral Otto Ciliax
Kriegsmarine

Otto Ciliax was one of the more capable (and unsung) commanders in the Kriegsmarine who, like many other officers, began his
career in the First World War. He rose through the ranks as a torpedo boat commandant and later was the commanding officer
of both the Admiral Scheer and Scharnhorst. Ciliax’s most notable naval action was Operation Cerberus, in which he was the
commanding officer. Admiral Ciliax‘s fleet successfully made the ‘Channel Dash’ across the English Channel (escaping detection
for twelve hours) to repair and resupply in Germany. Ciliax later became commander in Chief of the Supreme Naval Command
Norway.

Vice Admiral Gunichi Mikawa
Imperial Japanese Navy

Admiral Mikama served on many different vessels of the Imperial Japanese Navy
and was an instructor at the Naval Torpedo School. He later commanded the
cruisers Aoba and Chokai as well as the battlecruiser Kirishima. Mikawa was
considered to be the victor of Savo Island where aboard his flagship (the Chokai)
he led a makeshift fleet in a surprise attack on Allied forces. Several Allied cruisers
were sunk and over a thousand Allied servicemen were killed. Admiral Mikawa
fought with distinction in the battles at Guadalcanal and later served as flag
commander for the 2nd Southern Expeditionary Fleet in the Philippines, the
Southwestern Area Fleet, and 13th Air Fleet before being assigned to shore duties
where he would remain until the end of the war.
Traits: Night Fighter, Torpedo School Graduate, Strike Commander
Flagship: Takao-class cruiser Chokai

13
Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Admirals

Traits: Commerce Raider, Master of the High Seas, Defensive Tactician
Flagship: Scharnhorst-class battlecruiser Scharnhorst

Vice Admiral Alberto De Zara
Regia Marina

Alberto De Zara was an Italian naval officer that led his squadron to victory by thwarting Operation Harpoon in the Mediterranean.
An allied fleet charged with resupplying Malta was mauled in June 1942 with two ships surviving. De Zara commanded the
Italian squadron from the Light Cruiser Eugenio Di Savoia. His victory is considered to be the only squadron-level victory of the
Italian Navy in World War II.
Traits: Master of the High Seas, Commerce Raider, Tactical Genius
Flagship: Condottieri-class light cruiser Eugenio di Savoia

Rear Admiral Robert Jaujard
Free French Navy

Admiral Jaujard was a distinguished French officer who aboard his flagship, La Galissonnière-class light cruiser Montcalm,
participated in Operation Neptune during the Normandy Invasion. Jaujard’s ship along with the hundreds of other vessels
involved with the operation were the naval side of Operation Overlord, providing support for the landing forces that stormed
the French shore.
Traits: Defensive Tactician, Fearless, Master of the High Seas
Flagship: La Galissonniere-class cruiser Montcalm

Captain 1st Grade N.I. Vinogradov
Admirals

Soviet Navy

Commander of the Artic Submarine Brigade of the Northern Fleet, Vinogradov was a capable commander. The twenty submarines
under his command were the main striking force of the northern sea routes and were responsible for sinking over twenty
warships and nearly eighty transport vessels. The submarines under Captain Vinogradov’s command employed minelaying as
well as traditional submarine weapons in their fight against Axis vessels. Vinogradov survived the war and was promoted to rear
admiral.
Traits: Hunter of the Deep, Commerce Raider, Master of the High Seas
Flagship: Any Russian submersible

14
Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Advanced Aircraft
Operations
Aircraft in World War II changed naval warfare forever. As the aircraft carrier evolved into an asset that rivaled battleships in
importance, the tactics and deployment of combat aircraft changed significantly. Aircraft became much more than the eyes of a
military force, and dogfights changed from honorable duels into ruthless airborne battles. Massed aircraft attacking enemy fleets
or ground targets cost thousands of personnel their lives. Combat aircraft became an admiral’s valued asset – or his worst fear.
The main rulebook remains the basis of using aircraft in games of Victory at Sea. The rules presented here are intended to add a
new level of realism and combat effectiveness to aircraft.

Dogfighting and Defence

Instead, to reflect the toughness of some aircraft a Defence score has been added to some flights. Any time an aircraft flight takes
a hit from any source, it may use its Defence score, rolling the indicated number or higher on one dice to avoid all damage. This
must be rolled separately for each hit or failed dogfight. Aircraft with no Defence score are destroyed immediately upon taking
a hit.

Ammunition

As fighters fought for supremacy of the skies, millions of rounds of ammunition were expended. To reflect finite supplies of
fighter ammunition, all aircraft carry enough ammunition to last for two turns of dogfighting.
This can be easily recorded by flipping an aircraft counter or rotating a miniature’s base after the first turn of ammo is expended.
After ammunition has been expended, a flight may still use its Dogfight score, but if it succeeds in beating its enemy, it will only
survive – it will not destroy its enemy.

AA Fire, Dual-Purpose Secondaries, and Attacking Bombers

AA fire now uses a new method for resolving attacks from ships targeting aircraft. Only AA guns (and Dual-purpose Secondary
Armament, which is explained below) may fire at aircraft. In addition the +1 Attack Dice bonus for AA fire targeting torpedo-and
dive-bombers no longer applies.
Halfway through the war, new aerial tactics were used against naval targets and new weapons were employed to deal with them.
Dual-purpose secondary weapons and proximity fuses became an effective means of air defence. Whether a ship’s Secondary
Armament will be used against aircraft or ships must be declared by the firing player when it fires during the Attack Phase - it
may not split its Secondary Armament between aircraft and surface vessels, and the range for anti-aircraft attacks made by dualpurpose Secondary Armament is the same as the ship’s AA guns.
The following ships are equipped with Dual-purpose guns: All British and US cruisers and aircraft carriers, all US battleships,
Fletcher-class destroyers, and the Queen Elizabeth, Renown, and King George V-class ships.

15
Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Advanced Aircraft Operations

To better reflect the capabilities of fighters and bombers, the following changes are used for dogfighting. Only fighters may
initiate a dogfight, while other aircraft types may only defend, using their Dogfight score. The resolution of dogfights remains
the same except for that aircraft Damage scores are no longer used.

Fighter Escorts

In addition to air superiority duties, fighters had another vital purpose - escorting bombers to their targets. To simulate this in
Victory at Sea, any fighter flight may be designated as an Escort at the beginning of its movement. In order to Escort, the flight
must move to within 1” of any type of bomber flight and must be kept within 1” on subsequent turns to maintain its Escorting
status. Fighter counters or miniatures may never overlap or be stacked.
Any time an enemy flight moves to within 2” of the Escorting fighter, the Escort may immediately move to intercept it,
interrupting and ending the opposing aircraft’s movement. The Escort must initiate a dogfight in the Attack Phase. Treat the
flight that has been intercepted by the Escort as being locked in a dogfight.

Carrier Operations

Carriers revolutionised warfare but required specific military doctrine and deployment. Aircraft carriers, while being a platform
that extends a fleet’s striking range greatly, have strengths and weaknesses that are unique to them alone. These rules define the
carrier’s roles of rearming and resupply as well as simulating the effects of damage on the effectiveness of carrier operations.

Reload and Refuel

Advanced Aircraft Operations

Bombers of all types expend their bomb loads and need resupply before their next mission. Fighters expend their ammunition
and need to be rearmed, while all planes require fuel. The process of rearming and refueling requires a flight spends two full turns
on a carrier (after the turn in which it lands), and replaces all bombs, fighter ammunition, and fuel used in combat.

Outfit for Anti-Ship Operations

A fighter flight may be equipped with bombs to drop on enemy surface ships. This is done either during Reload and Refuel or
before play begins (in which case fighter flights carrying bombs are designated as such before the first turn). Fighters carrying
bombs have their Dogfight scores reduced by -2 and their Speed reduced by 4”. These modifiers remain in effect throughout
the mission, until it lands and reloads/refuels on board a carrier. The Attack Dice, Damage Dice, and traits of the bombs or
torpedoes are listed in the entry for each individual aircraft type later in this chapter. Only bombs or torpedoes may be carried,
never both.

Night Operations

No carrier may launch or recover aircraft at night, except for Royal Navy Albacore and Swordfish flights in games set in 1942 or
later, or Hellcat flights off the Independence-class light carriers in games set in 1944 or later..

Carrier Operations in Bad Weather

Launching and recovering aircraft in bad weather was a risky proposition. In games with Bad Weather conditions, a dice must be
rolled for every flight that is launched or recovered. On the roll of a 1, that flight is destroyed.

Fire

Shipboard fires are a carrier captain’s nightmare. No carrier may launch or recover any planes while fires are burning. In addition,
if three or more fires are burning after attempts to extinguish them in the End Phase fail, an additional 1D6 points of Damage
are inflicted upon the burning carrier. In addition, one flight of planes still onboard (determined randomly) will be destroyed
automatically.

Anti-Submarine Warfare

Some aircraft could detect and attack submarines with aerial depth charges. Aircraft listed as ASW under Type (see page 19) are
considered to be long-range maritime patrol craft. Their Bomb scores are treated as depth charges.
An ASW aircraft can be moved into contact with a submerged enemy submersible and attempt detection in preparation to
attack.
If attempting to detect a submarine that has fired torpedoes this turn, the detection roll is 4+. If the submarine has not fired
torpedoes yet the detection roll is 6+. Submarines that have surfaced will be automatically detected as normal. Attacking aircraft
can make a single attack using the Attack Dice and Damage Dice listed below.

16
Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Aircraft
Observation
Non-ASW

AD
1
2

DD
3
3

Aerial depth charges are expendable munitions and One Shot. Airplanes from the aircraft rosters list (see page 19) may use their
listed Depth Charge Attack Dice as an ‘ammunition’ score, with each Attack Dice used being subtracted from the total Depth
Charge Attack Dice listed.
Example: A flight of French Latecoere 298 aircraft detect a German U-boat threatening an allied task force. It dives to attack, using two
of its four attack dice to target the submarine. Having scored a hit and sinking the vessel the flight continues its anot-submarine duties, now
having just two attack dice left to target any new enemy submersibles.
Ships with the Aircraft trait may assign their observation aircraft to ASW duties before the first turn, and will have one depth
charge-equipped plane to use against submersibles. ‘Small’ aircraft include all US Navy and Royal Navy carrier-borne flights that
are capable of carrying bombs and torpedoes (though not fighters that Outfit for Anti-Ship Operations). Small aircraft may be
designated as having ASW loads only before play begins.

Variant Air Groups

To use the list, track down the columns for each type to see the aircraft available. Refer to the original air group for the carrier
to determine the number of flights carried of each type, and then select a new aircraft of the same type for the year in question.
The quantity of aircraft types as they are listed for each specific carrier must remain the same.
For example, if a carrier is listed as having three fighter flights, three torpedo-bomber flights, and four dive bomber flights in its
fleet list entry, a player may not change the complement to five torpedo-bomber flights and five fighter flights, though the class
of aircraft may be changed (swapping three Seafire flights to three Corsair flights, for instance).
As a general rule, Variant Air Groups should be used in any game set in a specific year when In Service Dates are being used.

Royal Navy Air Groups
Year
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945

Fighter
Skua, Sea Gladiator
Fulmar
Fulmar
Martlet, Fulmar, Seafire, Sea Hurricane
Martlet, Seafire, Sea Hurricane
Corsair, Firefly, Seafire, Hellcat
Corsair, Firefly, Seafire, Hellcat

Torpedo-Bomber
Swordfish
Swordfish
Swordfish, Albacore
Swordfish, Albacore
Avenger, Barracuda
Avenger, Barracuda
Avenger, Barracuda

17
Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Dive-Bomber
Skua
Swordfish, Skua
Swordfish, Albacore
Swordfish, Albacore
Avenger, Barracuda
Avenger, Barracuda
Avenger, Barracuda

Advanced Aircraft Operations

The fleet lists include recommended aircraft types for each carrier, generally using a typical 1942 air group or one deployed in
the year the carrier was commissioned. However, aircraft that made up carrier air groups varied considerably, especially as the war
progressed. The following is a list of common aircraft types in use on board carriers during World War II. This list can be used
to amend carrier air groups in subsequent years and are intended to be used with the In Service dates and chosen year of each
Victory at Sea battle.

United States Navy Air Groups
Year
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945

Fighter
Wildcat
Wildcat
Wildcat
Wildcat, Hellcat
Wildcat, Hellcat, Corsair
Wildcat, Hellcat, Corsair

Torpedo-Bomber
Devastator, Vindicator
Devastator, Vindicator
Devastator, Vindicator
Avenger
Avenger
Avenger

Dive-Bomber
Dauntless
Dauntless
Dauntless
Dauntless, Helldiver
Dauntless, Helldiver
Helldiver

Imperial Japanese Navy Air Groups

Advanced Aircraft Operations

Year
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945

Fighter
Claude
Zero
Zero
Zero
Zero
Zero
Zero

Torpedo-Bomber
Kate
Kate
Kate
Kate
Kate
Jill
Jill

Dive-Bomber
Val
Val
Val
Val
Val, Paul
Val, Paul, Judy
Val, Paul, Judy

Revised Aircraft

To accommodate these new rules, the following list of aircraft combines the aircraft found in the Victory at Sea main rulebook
with new aircraft types found in Order of Battle. All changes to aircraft are official, replacing previously published material.


Pl/Flights indicates how many flights are available for one Fleet Allocation Point of the indicated Priority Level.



Italicized Bomb or Torpedo scores denote optional loadouts. Full penalties listed for fighters on page 16 will apply to aircraft
with optional loadouts, Attack aircraft craft may switch to optional loadouts with no penalty to their performance.



Italicized In Service dates denote a projected year for deployment.



Defence scores are explained on page 15.



Planes listed as ASW represent a single plane, not an entire flight, and are further explained on page 16.



Planes listed as Kamikaze are explained on page 7.

18
Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Royal Navy Master Aircraft Roster
In
PL/Flights Service Type
Patrol/4
1938
Fighter
Patrol/2

1938

Patrol/2

Bomb Bomb Bomb
Speed Target Dodge Defence Dogfight AD
DD
Traits
15
4+
4+

+0




Torp. Torp. Torp.
AD
DD Traits




4+

4+

6+

+1

3

3

AP







1940

Dive
15
Bomber
Attack 21

5+

3+

5+

+2

3

3

AP







Patrol/2

1936

Attack

11

5+

2+



+0

9

2









Patrol/2

1942

Attack

17

4+

4+

6+

+1

4

3

AP

3

4

AP

Skirmish/3 1944

Fighter

26

5+

3+

6+

+4

3

4

AP







Patrol/4
Patrol/3

1940
1936

Fighter
Attack

19
10

4+
5+

4+
2+




+2
+0

3
6

2
2





3


4


AP

Patrol/3

1937

Fighter

17

6+

2+



+1













Patrol/2

1940

Fighter

21

5+

3+



+3

3

2









Patrol/2

1937

Fighter

21

5+

3+



+2

3

2









Skirmish/3 1941

Fighter

27

5+

3+

6+

+4

3

4

AP







Patrol/3

14

3+

5+

4+

+1

1

3

AP







Skirmish/3 1938

Patrol,
ASW
Fighter

25

5+

3+



+4

1

3

AP







Patrol/2

Fighter

26

5+

3+

6+

+3

3

4

AP







1937

1943

Kriegsmarine Master Aircraft Roster
In
PL/Flights Service Type
Patrol/2
1941
Fighter

Bomb Bomb Bomb Torp. Torp. Torp.
Speed Target Dodge Defence Dogfight AD
DD
Traits AD
DD Traits

+3
1
4
AP



27
5+
3+

Patrol/3

15

3+

5+

4+

+1

2

3

AP







20

3+

5+

4+

+1

12

4

AP







17

3+

5+

5+

+0

6

3

AP

6

3

AP

12

4+

4+

6+

+1

3

4

SAP







1942

Patrol,
ASW
Level
Bomber
Level
Bomber
Dive
Bomber
Fighter

23

5+

3+



+3

1

3

AP







1937

Fighter

23

4+

4+

6+

+2

1

3

AP







Aircraft
Focke-Wulf
Fw-190
FW-200
Condor
He 177

Skirmish/2 1936

HE-111 H2

Skirmish/4 1936

Junkers Ju-87

Patrol/2

1938

Messerschmitt Patrol/3
Me-109 G
Messerschmitt Patrol/3
Me-110

1941

19
Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Advanced Aircraft Operations

Aircraft
Blackburn
Roc
Blackburn Sea
Skua
Bristol
Beaufighter
TFX
Fairey
Albacore
Fairey
Barracuda
Fairey Firefly
V
Fairey Fulmar
Fairey
Swordfish
Gloster
Gladiator
Grumman
F4F Martlet
Hawker
Hurricane I
Hawker
Typhoon
Short
Sunderland V
Supermarine
Seafire LF
MkIII
Vought
Corsair

US Navy Master Aircraft Roster
In
PL/Flights Service Type
Skirmish/2 1938
Level
Bomber
Douglas
Patrol/2
1937
Level
Devastator
Bomber
F4-U1A Corsair Patrol/2
1943
Fighter
Grumman F4F Patrol/2
1940
Fighter
Wildcat
Grumman F6F Skirmish/3 1943
Fighter
Hellcat
Grumman
Skirmish/3 1942
Attack
TBM3 Avenger
Skirmish/4 1939
Level
Lockheed
Bomber
Hudson
P39 Aircobra
Patrol/2
1942
Fighter
P40N Warhawk Patrol/2
1941
Fighter
P51D Mustang Patrol/2
1941
Fighter
PBY5 Catalina Patrol/3
1936
Patrol,
ASW
SB2C Helldiver Skirmish/3 1942
Dive
Bomber
SBD5
Skirmish/3 1940
Dive
Dauntless
Bomber
Vought
Patrol/2
1937
Dive
Vindicator
Bomber

Advanced Aircraft Operations

Aircraft
Boeing B-17

Bomb Bomb Bomb Torp. Torp. Torp.
Speed Target Dodge Defence Dogfight AD
DD
Traits AD DD Traits
20
3+
5+
4+
+1
12
4
AP



14

4+

4+



+0

2

4

AP

3

4

AP

26
21

5+
5+

3+
3+

6+


+3
+3

3
3

4
2

AP











25

6+

2+

6+

+4

1

4

AP







18

4+

4+

6+

+1

3

4

AP

3

4

AP

17

3+

5+

4+

+1

6

3

AP

6

3

AP

26
24
26
12

5+
5+
6+
3+

3+
3+
2+
5+




5+

+2
+3
+4
+1

3
2
3
1

3
3
4
3

AP
AP
AP
AP




1




4




AP

19

4+

4+

6+

+1

3

4

SAP

3

4

SAP

17

4+

4+



+1

3

4

SAP







17

4+

4+



+0

2

4

SAP







Imperial Japanese Navy Master Aircraft Roster
Aircraft
Aichi D3A
‘Val’
Aichi E16A
‘Paul’
Kawanishi
H82K ‘Emily’
Kawanishi
N1K1-J
‘George’
Ki-115 Tsurgi
Mitsubishi
A5M4
‘Claude’
Mitsubishi
A6M ‘Zero’
Mitsubishi
G4M1 ‘Betty’
MXY ‘Ohka’
Nakajima
B5N2 ‘Kate’
Nakajima
B6N ‘Jill’
Yokosuka
B4Y1 ‘Jean’
Yokosuka
D4Y2 ‘Judy’

In
PL/Flights Service Type
Skirmish/3 1939
Attack

Bomb Bomb Bomb Torp. Torp. Torp.
Speed Target Dodge Defence Dogfight AD
DD
Traits AD
DD Traits
16
5+
3+

+1
3
4
SAP




Patrol/2

1943

Attack

15

5+

3+



+1

3

2









Patrol/2

1941

19

3+

5+

4+

+1

1

3

AP

1

3

AP

Patrol/2

1945

Patrol,
ASW
Fighter

24

5+

3+



+5

3

3

AP







Patrol/ 2
Patrol/3

1945
1935

Kamikaze
Fighter

21
18

3+
6+

3+
2+




+0
+1

1
3

7
1

SAP











Patrol/2

1940

Fighter

23

6+

2+



+3

1

2









19

3+

5+

6+

+0

6

3

AP

3

3

AP

Skirmish/2 1945
Patrol/2
1935

Level
Bomber
Kamikaze
Attack

43
16

4+
5+

4+
3+


6+

+0
+1

1
4

7
3

SAP
AP

3

3

AP

Skirmish/3 1944

Attack

19

5+

3+



+1

3

2



3

3

AP

Patrol/2

Attack

11

5+

3+



+1

3

2



3

3

AP

Dive
Bomber

23

5+

3+



+1

2

3

SAP







Skirmish/3 1941

1936

Skirmish/3 1944

20
Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Italian Navy Master Aircraft Roster
Aircraft
Breda Ba
201
Fiat G50
Freccia
Junkers JU
87
Macchi MC
202 Folgore
Reggiane
Re 2001
Falco II
Sparviero
SM.79

In
PL/Flights Service Type
Patrol/2
1943
Attack

Bomb Bomb Bomb Torp. Torp. Torp.
Speed Target Dodge Defence Dogfight AD
DD
Traits AD
DD Traits
14
5+
3+

+1
3
3
AP




Patrol/3

1939

Fighter 19

5+

3+



+2













Patrol/2

1941

4+

5+

6+

+1

3

4

SAP







Patrol/3

1941

Dive
12
Bomber
Fighter 24

5+

3+



+2

3

3









Patrol/2

1941

Fighter 22

5+

3+



+3

3

3

AP







Skirmish/3

1936

Attack

3+

5+

5+

0

6

3

AP

3

3

AP

18

French Navy Master Aircraft Roster
In
PL/Flights Service Type
Patrol/3
1939
Fighter

Bomb Bomb Bomb Torp. Torp.
Speed Target Dodge Defence Dogfight AD
DD
Traits AD
DD
22
5+
3+

+2






Torp.
Traits


Patrol/3

1938

11

5+

3+



+1

4

3

AP

3

3

AP

Patrol/2

1939

Attack,
ASW
Dive
Bomber

16

5+

3+



+1

1

4

SAP







Patrol/3
Patrol/2

1938
1937

Fighter
Attack

20
17

5+
4+

3+
4+




+2
+0


3


2













Russian Navy Master Aircraft Roster
Aircraft
Ilyshuin Il-4
Ilyshuin Il-10
Polikaporov
I-16
Sukhoi Su-2
‘Ivanov’
Tupolev SB 2
Yak 9

In
PL/Flights Service Type
Skirmish/2 1942
Level
Bomber
Skirmish/3 1943
Attack
Patrol/2
1937
Fighter

Bomb Bomb Bomb Torp. Torp. Torp.
Speed Target Dodge Defence Dogfight AD
DD
Traits AD
DD Traits
3
3
AP
17
3+
5+
6+
0
10
3

22
19

5+
6+

3+
2+

5+


+2
+2

3
3

3
1

AP











Patrol/2

1937

Attack

17

5+

3+



+2

3

3

AP

3

3

AP

Skirmish/2

1936

17

3+

5+

6+

+0

9

4









Patrol/3

1937

Level
Bomber
Fighter

24

4+

4+



+3













21
Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Advanced Aircraft Operations

Aircraft
Dewtoine
D520
Latecoere
298
Loire
Nieuport
LN 401
MS 406
Potez 63.11

Scenarios
The following pages introduce a range of new scenarios, both historical and otherwise, designed to challenge the tactical abilities
of Victory at Sea players.

June, 1942.

Bait

As the combined fleets of Admiral Yamamoto prepared to attack the Midway Atoll another Japanese fleet was sent to the North
Pacific, a force that was perceived to be little more than a feint. A diversion, meant to draw attention and American naval assets
from Midway. The actual mission of the Northern Area Force was sent to the Aleutian Islands under the command of Vice
Admiral Boshiro Hosogaya to establish an anchor for a Japanese defensive perimeter; the anchor was to be the Aleutian Islands.
It was perceived as bait by the United States Navy, the ships of the Northern Area Force was never engaged by American ships at
the time of the Battle of Midway, more due to weather than anything else. Unknown to the Japanese admiralty the United States
was aware of enemy fleet movements in the North Pacific. Rear Admiral Robert Theobold sent elements from his under-strength
fleet to look for the Japanese fleet on June 5, 1942. He took the Bait. Visual contact was made by U.S. aircraft but the warships
on both sides did not engage each other, The Northern Area Force was lost in the fog.

Scenarios

But what if things had been different…
Bait is a scenario for Victory at Sea that features a hypothetical battle between elements of Imperial Japan’s Northern Area Force
and part of Admiral Theobold’s Task Force 8. Events in this scenario diverge from actual history on June 4, 1942. The American
admiral sends his fleet to look for the Japanese ships a day earlier. While steaming south at night the fog lifts and contact is made
with the Northern Force 800 miles from Dutch Harbor. Both sides engage as blasts from shipboard guns light up the night…
Fleets: The Japanese force consists of two cruisers (Kitikami-class cruisers Kitikami and Oi), Destroyer Division 24 (the Shiratsuyuclass destroyers Umikaze, Yamakaze, Kawakaze, Suzukaze), and the battleship Fuso. Problems with the unfamiliar radar systems
and heavy fog have cut these ships off from their fleet. The United States player has the Portland-class Cruiser Indianapolis, the
Northampton-class cruiser Louisville, the Brooklyn-class cruisers Honolulu, Nashville, and St. Louis. U.S destroyers are the Mahanclass ship Case (treat as a Fletcher-class) and the Clemson-class ships Sands, Kane, and Humphreys.
Pre-Battle Preparation: The opposing fleets are positioned as shown on the diagram below. The 4’x6’ area is broken down into
2’x2’ squares, with both players placing the ships designated on the deployment chart anywhere within their assigned squares.
Scenario Rules: Full Night Battles rules are in effect.
Game Length: The battle lasts until one side is victorious.
Victory and Defeat: Send all enemy ships to the bottom or force surrender. Neither side can claim victory until the opposing
fleet is completely destroyed or concedes.

22
Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Scenarios

23
Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Bombardment
During World War II the guns of naval vessels were sometimes called upon to bombard well-defended land targets, often in
conjunction with landing operations. Mines and fortified positions could make this a formidable and deadly undertaking.
Bombardment allows players to use the Minefield, Terrain, and Shore Batteries rules included in this supplement.
The Fleets: The Attacker gets 5 Fleet Allocation Points for his fleet. The Defender also receives 5 FAP with at least 1 point being
spent on Shore Batteries and 1 point on Minefields.
Aircraft: The attacker is restricted to flights aboard his carriers (if any), the defender may purchase land-based aircraft.
Pre-Battle Preparation: The Attacker begins play in the Attacker Deployment Area. The defender chooses an appropriate marker
for his shore batteries. This is placed at the table edge inside the Defender Deployment Area with the entire edge representing the
shoreline with it’s shallows extending 1” from the table edge. Minefields are placed as per the Minefield rules anywhere outside
of the Attacker Deployment Area. Defending ships are placed within the Defender Deployment Area. Determine first turn
initiative normally.
Game Length: Twelve turns or when victory conditions are met.

Scenarios

Victory and Defeat: The attacker wins when all shore batteries are destroyed. The defender is victorious when 75% of the
attackers ships (round down) are destroyed or the attacker is driven off.

24
Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Flat Top
As naval warfare changed from one of opposing battleships to one of carrier-based warfare tactics and objectives changed as a new
way of waging war was born. Carrier groups traversed the oceans trying to avoid detection to get close enough to land targets or
enemy fleets to unleash their aircraft. Flat top is a scenario that depicts the detection of a carrier group by an opposing fleet that
is determined to take the enemy carriers out of the war permanently.
Fleets: The attacking player (seeking out the enemy carriers) has 5 Fleet Allocation Points but must spend at least one full point
on aircraft. These could be considered to land-based or carrier based but there are no restrictions on the type or quantity of aircraft
taken. No aircraft carriers may be included in the attacking force. The defending player Gets 5 Fleet Allocation Points but must have
at least two aircraft carriers included in his force, with no additional ground-based aircraft (just the planes from the carriers).
Pre-Battle Preparation: The attacker divides his fleet into 2 groups; one consisting of all of his aircraft, one consisting of all
surface ships. The defender divides his fleet as follows; one group of one half of his carrier’s aircraft (player’s choice as to which
planes are aloft though carriers will have their standard compliment of planes), one group for all ships that are not carriers (the
escort group), one group of all of that fleet’s carriers. The attacker begins with his aircraft in the Attacker Deployment Area. The
defender has none of his force on the table at the beginning of turn one.

Game Length: 12 turns or when victory conditions are met.
Victory and Defeat: The Attacking player wins when two carriers are destroyed. The defender achieves victory if two carriers remain
in play at the end of turn twelve. If neither side meets its’ victory condition calculate Victory Points to determine the winner.

25
Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Scenarios

Scenario Rules: The game takes place during the daytime in perfect weather. The attacking planes may move normally in the first
turn. At the beginning of turn two the attacker places his ships in the Attacker Deployment Area. At the beginning of turn two
(before Initiative) the defender places his group of aircraft in the Defender Deployment Area, but only those that were designated
as being aloft. At the beginning of each successive turn the defender rolls a die, on a 5+ he places his escort group in the Defender
Deployment Area. The die roll is modified by +2 for each turn after the third. The turn after the escorts are deployed the defending
carriers are placed in the Defender Deployment Area and only then may the remainder of their aircraft be launched.

For the Motherland!
In the later years of WWII portions of the navy of the Soviet Union were rendered useless as they sat in port, not able to push
through the axis navies that controlled the seas in northwestern Russia. Wave after wave of air Luftwaffe attacks pounded Leningrad.
Joseph Stalin did not commit his navy to what would have been a costly battle to break out into the Gulf of Finland.
What if Stalin HAD committed his ships to battle?
For the Motherland! is a scenario that simulates what could have happened if Stalin had ordered his ships that were trapped in the
Gulf of Finland to break through the Axis line. The Russian leader comes to the conclusion that it would be better for his warships
to be confined in a neutral port so that they may survive to protect the Motherland after the fascist invaders are defeated and driven
from Mother Russia. The Germans learn of Stalin’s plans and have a task force waiting to intercept the Soviet vessels.
The Fleets: The Soviet fleet consists of the Sovietski-Soyuz-class battleship Sovietski Ukrania, the Sevestapol (Gangut-class
battleship), the cruiser Maxim Gorky (Maxim Gorky-class), the Novik-class destroyers Lenin, Desna, Zinoviev, and Korfu. The
aircraft in the land-based Soviet air group are 8 flights of Yak-9 fighters, 8 flights of Su-2 “Ivanov” attack planes with full bomb
loads, and 3 flights of Il 10 attack planes.

Scenarios

The Kriegsmarine fleet is comprised of the battleship Tirpitz (Bismarck-class), the heavy cruisers Admiral Hipper and Prinz Eugen
(Admiral Hipper-class), the pocket battleship Admiral Scheer (Deutschland-class), the light cruiser Emden (Emden-class), the Kclass light cruisers Koln and Nurnberg, the destroyers Z 24, Z25, Z31, Z32 (Zerstorer 1936-class) and the Type 93 torpedo boats
T 22, T 23, T 27, and T 28. The German air patrol consists of 4 flights of Me-109s and 6 flights of Ju-87 dive bombers.
Pre-Battle Preparation: Deploy both forces as desired inside their deployment zones. The German aircraft are not placed on the
board in the initial set up.
Scenario Rules: To determine when the German air patrol enters the battle roll one die at the beginning of turn 3. The aircraft
deploy 1” from the long table edge on the German side of the table on a roll of 6. Each following turn add 2 to the die roll until
the aircraft become available. The goal of the Soviet navy is to break through the German line.
Victory and Defeat: The
scenario has duration of 12
turns or until all Soviet ships
are destroyed or escape. The
Kriegsmarine player gains full
victory points for Soviet ships
that are destroyed, crippled,
or reduced to a skeleton crew.
Each Soviet flight of aircraft
destroyed earns the German
player 1 victory point. The
Soviet player only receives onehalf the normal victory points
but will receive victory points
equal to one-half the value of
each of his ships (not aircraft)
that are able to move off the
Kriegsmarine end of the table.
Full victory points value will be
awarded to Sovietski Ukrania
and Sevestapol if they are able
to escape via the opposing table
edge.

26
Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Hunting the Beast
Operations with the Tirpitz in the North Atlantic, November 1941

The campaign rules in Victory at Sea are necessarily simplified and allow several opposing fleets to engage in long term warfare.
The aim of this campaign is to present a set of rules that give more detail in a specific operation.
The setting for this campaign is the projected breakout of the German battleship Tirpitz and heavy cruiser Scheer into the North
Atlantic in November 1941, although they could be easily adapted to other periods. At this stage of the war the United States
was still officially neutral, although US battleships were actively patrolling in the Denmark Straits, and several American ships
had already been sunk by German U-boats, most notably the destroyer Reuben James.
The problem with most naval campaigns of this sort is reconciling hidden movement with the need to perform detection attempts.
Without an umpire to help out this is problematical when there are only two players involved. The system suggested below works
because some particular circumstances are in play. First, the weather in the North Atlantic in November is particularly bad. This
could, easily mean that ships of opposing sides could be in close proximity yet not see each other. Radar was also in its infancy
and could not be counted upon to make a detection. Both sides made extensive use of ELINT (electronic intelligence), which
was quite effective at revealing the location (or at least the presence) of searching aircraft, or of communications between ships
or with land based operation centres. This is the rationale behind the rules requiring disclosure of searching units.

Background

November 1941 – Tensions between the USA and Germany are running high. In Germany, Hitler publicly warns: ‘Let there be no
mistake - whoever believes that he can help Britain must realize one thing above all: Every ship, with or without convoy, that comes
within range of our torpedo tubes, will be torpedoed.’ Privately, the Fuehrer says to Admiral Raeder, ‘I will never call a submarine
commander to account if he torpedoes an American ship by mistake. After the Eastern campaign I reserve the right to take severe
action against the USA...’ In September 1941 Roosevelt issues orders to shoot on sight any ship interfering with American shipping.
Having recovered from the Bismarck debacle earlier in the year, the German high command decided that, once more, its
battleships should strike in the North Atlantic. This time the Tirpitz was to sortie, accompanied initially by the Admiral Scheer
(which may be detached to sortie independently). At least two Allied convoys are believed to be at sea, and information on
their progress should be available via shadowing U-boats. The British patrols in the Denmark Straits are being supplemented
by so-called neutrality patrols conducted by the US Navy These are believed to be anything but neutral - the US Navy has been
escorting merchant ships, including those of ‘any nationality which may join,’ between Iceland and America. The US Navy has
also developed a base at Hvalfjord to support these tasks. The British and American naval fleets can be split into smaller task
forces, improving their chances of finding the German raiders but weakening their ability to destroy the raiders once they have
been found.
Note – this scenario is based on actual German plans for November 1941. In the event the operation was cancelled due to
mechanical failure, but the possibility of a clash between German and US battleships in the wastes of the North Atlantic is too
good an opportunity to pass up!

Scales
Each campaign Turn is 6 hours long. Each hex on the campaign map is 100 miles across

27
Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Hunting the Beast

Whilst these conditions are fairly specific to this campaign similar circumstances exist in other periods that would allow a similar
method to be used (an easy example would be the Bismarck chase, but obvious parallels exist in modern naval campaigns where
disclosure of searching units would imply the use of active sensors)

Axis Forces

Start at Trondheim (G35)
Tirpitz, Admiral Scheer, Uckermark

Allied Naval Forces and Convoys
US Task Group 1.3 (RAdm Giffen) Starts at Reykjavik (F22)
Idaho (BB) New Mexico-class
Mississippi (BB) New Mexico-class
Tuscaloosa (CA) New Orleans-class
Wichita (CA) Portland-class
Gwin (DD) Fletcher-class
Meredith (DD) Fletcher-class
Monssen (DD) Fletcher-class

RN Home Fleet (Admiral Tovey) Starts at Scapa Flow (K30)
King George V (BB) King George V-class
Victorious (CV) Illustrious-class
Norfolk (CA) Norfolk-class
Berwick (CA) Kent-class
Nigeria (CL) Fiji-class
Sheffield (CL) Southampton-class
Cossack (DD) Tribal-class
Zulu (DD) Tribal-class
Sikh (DD) Tribal-class
Piorun (DD) Tribal-class

Hunting the Beast

Allied Convoys
Convoy HX 158 Starts at hex V2
40 transports
Escort Group EG 4.14.4 (RCN)
Ottawa (DD) JKN-class
Dauphin (DE) Flower-class
Arvida (DE) Flower-class
Algoma (DE) Flower-class
Support Group (RN)
Burnham (DD) JKN-class
Chambley (DE) Flower-class
Matapedia (DD) JKN-class
Napanee (DE) Flower-class

Convoy SC53 Starts at hex R8
35 transports
Escort Group TU 4.1.8 (USN)
Greer (DD) Fletcher-class
Ludlow (DD) Clemson-class
McCormick (DD) Clemson-class
Buck (DD) Clemson-class
Woolsey (DD) Clemson-class
Wilkes (DD) Clemson-class

Objectives



The German player must attempt to sink as many transports as possible.
The allied player must try to get the convoys to Liverpool (O30)

Turn sequence
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.

Determine formation.
Roll for weather
Move convoys
Roll for convoy location – if successful declare locations to German player
Initiate refuelling
Roll for “at sea” refuelling location - if successful reveal location to Allied player
Check shadowing vessels
a. Check for evasion or engagement of shadowing vessels
b. Shadowed and shadowing vessels move together
c. Shadowing player informed of location of shadowed vessels
Move other vessels
Announce and resolve searches
Announce vessels in enemy’s Land Based Air (LBA) areas
Execute air strikes if in range or if in enemy LBA area, and if weather/daylight permits
Surface actions – roll for encounter, surprise etc.
Check vessel endurance.

28
Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Formations

At the start of each turn players must decide what formation their ships are cruising in. If they are encountered by the enemy then
this formation determines their starting positions (unless they have achieved surprise, in which case they may set up as desired).

Weather

Each turn the Allied player rolls to determine the weather conditions. On a roll of 1-4 the weather is Good, otherwise the weather
is Bad. If on the previous turn the weather was Bad add 1 to the die roll.

Movement and Endurance

The table below gives movement rates per turn in hexes depending on the speed of the fastest ship in the group. Convoys are
assumed to have a speed of 8 knots (VAS speed = 2).
Ship Speed
VaS Speed
Movement
Fuel Points Used

8 or less
1”
1 hex on odd turns
1

9-17
2”-3”
1 hex per turn
2

18-27
4”-5”
1 hex on odd turns, 2 hexes on even turns
3

28+
6”+
2 hexes per turn
4

Detection
Convoys
The convoys are being observed by U boats and Condor aircraft. Every turn roll a d6 for each convoy. The allied player must
reveal the location of the convoy on a score of 4+. If the weather is bad subtract 1 from the die roll.
Warship Searches
Each player now declares whether they are searching. Surface ships can search the hex they are in. Ships with operable observation
aircraft can search as many adjacent hexes as they have observation aircraft. Carrier aircraft can search 6 additional hexes per flight
committed to the search and can search up to two hexes away. Players must declare which hexes they are searching in (but need
not declare what is searching). Thus searching reveals some information on the likely locations of enemy forces. The ability to
use aircraft depends on the time of day and weather:
Type
Daylight
Twilight
Night, Bad Weather

Carrier Aircraft
Yes (out to 2 hexes)
Yes (out to 1 hex)
No

Seaplane
Yes (out to 1 hex)
No
No

Finally, roll a single d6 for each observation aircraft used for searching. On a roll of a 1, the aircraft has been lost (either due to a
crash, mechanical failure or simply disappearing) and is unavailable for the remainder of the operation.
Search Results
If a search is declared in a hex occupied by an enemy surface force roll a d6. The force is located on a roll of 3+ in daylight, 4+
in twilight or 5+ at night or in bad weather. Convoys are always detected, regardless of weather and daylight. The roll is made by
the player who owns the surface force (this should be a hidden roll and should be made whether or not there are any ships there).
If a successful roll is made those ships present are declared, as is the scouting unit that conducted the search.

29
Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Hunting the Beast

All ships (except the convoy and the German auxiliary Uckermark, which ignore these Endurance rules) have a fuel capacity of 60
units. Each turn that a ship moves it uses the number of fuel points listed above. When a ship expends all of its fuel units it may
only move at a maximum speed of 10 knots (but expends no fuel) – it may not conduct searches and it must head for the nearest
friendly port to refuel. German ships may refuel from the Uckermark. Refuelling at a base takes 24 hours (4 turns). Refuelling
at sea takes 1 turn to complete, during which the auxiliary and the fuelled ship(s) may not move. There is a chance that ULTRA
intercepts may reveal the location of the refuelling. Roll a d6 on the turn that refuelling takes place, and each turn thereafter until
a successful roll is made. On a roll of 1-2 the location of the refuelling point is revealed (note: the allied player may learn of this
many hours after the event!)

Land Based Air Searches and Attacks

Both sides are assumed to have regular air patrols in sea areas along their coast. If enemy shipping appears in these hexes they
are automatically detected (whether during the day or night, or in bad weather) and their presence is immediately declared. If
the ships are detected during either daylight or twilight and the weather is good they may be attacked by land based aircraft.
This is the only condition in which land based air strikes take part in the game. Allied air attacks take place anywhere within the
perimeter of hexes marked “B”, “I” or “U” on the map (flying from Britain, Iceland or the USA respectively). Luftwaffe attacks
take place anywhere within the perimeter marked G. Both Allied and German aircraft can attack in hexes marked “BG”.
To determine the number of flights in land based air strikes roll a d6:
Die Roll
1
2
3
4
5
6*

Allied (“B” Hexes)
Beaufighter x 3
Beaufighter x 2
Swordfish x 2
Swordfish x 3
Albacore x 3
Albacore x 3

Allied (“I” Hexes)
Beaufighter x 2
Beaufighter x 2
Hudson x 2
Hudson x 3
Hudson x 3
Hudson x 3

Allied (“U” Hexes)
B17 x 3
B17 x 3
Hudson x 3
Hudson x 3
B17 x 3
Hudson x 4

German
He111x2, Ju87 x 2
Ju87 x 3
Ju87 x 3
Ju88 x 3
He111 x 3
He111 x 3

Carrier Air Strikes

Hunting the Beast

If a player has a carrier in range of an enemy ship (within 2 hexes) they may launch an air strike. This is resolved immediately.
Note that the Victorious has enough ordnance to allow each Swordfish flight to make 2 torpedo attacks, and all aircraft to make
4 bombing attacks.

Surface Actions

If a surface force detects another in the same hex the two forces may fight a surface action (unless both opt to withdraw). Run
through the following procedure to determine whether an action ensues, and whether one side achieves surprise over the other.
Has one side achieved Surprise?
Each player rolls a d6, adding 2 if they have active radar, +2 if they have radar, and+2 if they have observation or carrier borne
aircraft in the hex. If one side’s score exceeds the enemy score by 6 or more then they have achieved surprise.
If one side has achieved surprise they have the option of withdrawing (hiding in the gloom and avoiding detection by the enemy)
or shadowing (remaining in contact to report the enemy’s position). If they take this option they remain in the hex, but they stay
far enough away to stay out of contact (it is assumed that they make optimum use of poor visibility to remain undetected whilst
keeping their opponents under observation). If they achieve surprise but decide not to withdraw or shadow they may attack the
enemy. They set up in any desired formation at the extreme limit of visibility (or greater if using radar) - the opposition must be
in fleet formation - and the surprising side gets one free round of gunnery before the opposition can return fire.
Desire for Action?
Determine if either side wants an action. If neither does, both forces remain in the same hex but no combat occurs. If both sides
wish to engage, set up in their respective formations at the limit of visibility at the longest maximum range of any ship in either
force, or extreme radar range (whichever is longer). If the action is in bad weather or at night set up at the maximum spotting and
engagement distances as in the rules (30” in bad weather, 20” at night). If one side wishes to disengage it may do so automatically
if its speed exceeds that of the fastest enemy vessel. It may begin shadowing if desired.
Fighting the Action
The surface action is played out using whatever scenario is decided upon. Ships may be declared as disengaged if they remain out
of contact with the enemy for more thanthree turns.

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Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Avoided Contact
If a force avoids contact because it managed to disengage (as described on the previous page) it must vacate the hex in the next
turn. However that force may not do so across any hex sides through which enemy warships intend to exit. The enemy player
announces which hex sides are deemed “closed”, it is not possible to split a force so that all hex sides are closed, at least one hex
side must remain “open”.

Shadowing

Shadowing vessels move with the vessels they are shadowing and report their location. Shadowed vessels and their shadowers are
moved before unshadowed ships so that the latter may take advantage of the information received However, before movement
a shadowed vessel may attempt to shake off their shadower. Repeat the process for determining if the groups are aware of each
other, but apply a +2 modifier to the search die roll. If the search result roll is failed the shadowed vessels are lost; the shadowing
vessel is moved as normal; if the shadower remains in contact roll again for surprise; if the shadowing vessel is surprised the
shadowed vessels can either slip away as above, or can engage their shadower.
Example: Tirpitz and Admiral Scheer enter a hex containing the British heavy cruiser Norfolk. It is night and foggy (bad weather), but
the British cruiser has radar. Each player rolls a d6 to determine surprise, the British adding 2 to their score as they have radar. Both
sides roll a ‘3’, so no surprise is achieved. The Germans want to engage the cruiser, but it is faster than both the Tirpitz and the Admiral
Scheer, so no action occurs.
In subsequent turns the British cruiser shadows the Germans, whilst King George V and Victorious close the distance. However, in a
subsequent turn, Tirpitz attempts to shake off her shadower. Again it is night. The detection roll is 2; even with the +2 modifier for
shadowing the final score is only 4 – not enough to retain detection, so Tirpitz steels away from her shadower.

Every turn that a convoy location is declared roll a d10. On a score of 10 a ship has been torpedoed and sunk. If there are enemy
heavy units (cruisers or larger) in the same hex roll a d6 - on a 5+ the ship torpedoed is a warship. Choose which heavy unit is hit
randomly and resolve the attack normally. Assume that the heavy unit has been attacked by a Type VII U-boat with its forward
torpedoes, attacking the target’s beam. However, if a 1 is rolled, a submarine has been attacked and sunk. Subtract 1 from the
observation roll for that convoy the following turn, and do not make a d10 roll. Convoy detection and the d10 roll then return
to normal on subsequent turns.

Ending the game

The game ends when any of the following occur:


All German ships are sunk or return to Trondheim (G35) or Brest (S29).



All transport ships in both convoys are sunk.



The convoys reach Liverpool (O30) (although the Allied player may opt to continue the game in order to catch the
Germans on their way back to port).

Victory Conditions

Real warfare often does not have the benefit of niceties such as victory conditions (it leaves little for the historians to argue about
later!), so there are none for this campaign. Obviously, the Germans will lose if Tirpitz is sunk, the Allies if either convoy suffers
heavy casualties. However, if the results fall between these extremes the players are advised to retire to the bar and to continue
the ‘propaganda war’ there!

Uckermark and Allied Transports

For the Uckermark, use a Victory-class cargo ship. For Allied transports, use Liberty-class ships.

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Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Hunting the Beast

U-Boat attacks

Hunting the Beast

Turn Record
Date
1st November
2nd November
3rd November
4th November
5th November
6th November
7th November
8th November
9th November
10th November
11th November
12th November
13th November
14th November
15th November
16th November
17th November
18th November
19th November
20th November

00:00-06:00 (Night)

06:00-12:00 (Twilight)

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Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

12:00 – 18:00

18:00 –24:00 (Night)

Hunting the Beast Campaign Map

Hunting the Beast

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Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Expanded Fleet Lists
The following chapters detail many new ships for use in Victory at Sea. All are considered to be official and with the expanded
fleet lists players will be able to recreate many historical battles. Also included are lists of errata for ships presented in the Victory
at Sea main rulebook. Again, threes changes should be considered official.

Mixing Ships from Different Fleets

When building fleets, players must choose one fleet list to choose their ships from. Adding ships from other fleet lists is not
permissable unless outlined in a specific historical scenario. Having the Sharnhorst fight in a game alongside Hood or having
Pensacola in the same squadron as Chokai, for example, simply will not do. Historically, Allied or Axis nations did fight alongside
one another but mixing of ships, even from friendly nations, will be restricted to specific historical scenarios and not allowed
for build-your-own fleets.

In Service Dates

Many players already adhere to In Service Dates in their games, but with the addition of Kamikaze units, Z-Plan ships, and Air
Group Variants, the year in which a battle takes place becomes very important. In Service Dates must be observed in each battle,
and players should agree in what year of the war each battle or campaign will take place, before beginning fleet selection.

Expanded Fleet Lists

Splitting Fleet Allocation Points

Thousands of ships sailed the world’s oceans in World War II. The combination of ships deployed together in a nation’s fleets
were varied and many. From a squadron of escorts in the North Atlantic to the deadly carrier force that attacked Pearl Harbour,
Victory at Sea uses Priority Levels and Fleet Allocation Points to simulate the composition of those forces. With the addition of
new vessels to the game, players will now have greater flexibility in building their fleets.
Players wishing to break down Fleet Allocation Points beyond the values and ship quantities in the Fleet Allocation table may do
so. The following guidelines must be observed when splitting Fleet Allocation Points to maintain the balance of the game. This
will allow players to use a single Fleet Allocation Point to buy ships of different levels rather than of one Priority Level only.
A Fleet Allocation Point may be split to buy two ships of the next lowest Priority level just as stated in the main rules. However,
one of those picks at the next lowest level (one-half of a Fleet Allocation Point) may be used to buy two ships of the lower level
after that. A point may only be split ‘downwards’ two priority levels. Only one-half of the point may be split, so using one Battle
point to buy four Skirmish level ships is not allowed.
For example;
One Battle Fleet Allocation Point = one Raid-level ship and two Skirmish-level ships
Or
One Raid Fleet Allocation Point = one Skirmish-level ship and two Patrol-level ships
To summarise, a Fleet Allocation Point can be split in half, then split again. This system may be used on War, Battle, and Raidlevel points - the split on Skirmish and Patrol points is limited to that shown on the standard Fleet Allocation table. The number
of aircraft flights in a wing will remain the same, as will number of boats in an MTB group.

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Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

The Royal Navy
The Royal Navy was one of the key developers of naval radar in World War II, transferring many advances and technologies to
the US where they were developed and then fed back into Royal Navy designs. Practically every Royal Navy warship towards the
end of the war was fitted with some form of radar.
The entries here represent the state of ships as they were either in 1942 or at the time of their sinking if this took place in 1941
or earlier. For scenarios set in 1943 or later it can be assumed that all ships except aircraft carriers carry radar, including ships that
were historically sunk by that time but which have been resurrected for ‘what if ’ games or tournaments.

Errata

The following official changes should be made to ships in the Victory at Sea main rulebook.
Queen Elizabeth-class battleship: Target score should be 5+, add the Radar trait
Illustrious-class carrier: Priority Level should be Raid not Skirmish
J/K/N-class destroyer: Secondary Armament AD should be 1, add the Radar trait
Hood-class battlecruiser: Add the Radar trait, Priority Level should be Battle not War

Renown-class battlecruiser: Add the Radar trait
Edinburgh-class cruiser: Priority Level should be Skirmish not Raid
Fiji-class cruiser: Priority Level should be Skirmish not Raid
Gloucester-class cruiser: Add the Radar trait, Priority Level should be Skirmish not Raid
Leander-class cruiser: Add the Radar trait
Tribal-class destroyer: Add the Radar trait

The Royal Navy Expanded Fleet List

The following forms the expanded fleet list for the Royal Navy.
Priority Level: Patrol
Activity-class aircraft carrier
Coventry-class cruiser
Hunt-class destroyer escort
Merchant aircraft carrier
Tribal-class destroyer

Archer-class escort carrier
Curacoa-class cruiser
J, K and N-class destroyer
S-class submersible
Vindex-class aircraft carrier

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Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Audacity-class aircraft carrier
Delhi-class AA cruiser
Loch-class frigate
U class submersible

The Royal Navy

Nelson-class battleship: Priority Level should be Battle not War, Armour score should be 6+ not 5+, add the Radar trait

The Royal Navy

Priority Level: Skirmish
Ameer-class aircraft carrier
Attacker-class aircraft carrier
C class cruiser
Dido-class cruiser (1st, 2nd, and 3rd group)
Emerald-class cruiser
Fiji/Ceylon (mod) class cruiser
Hermes-class aircraft carrier
London-class cruiser
Roberts-class monitor
Tiger-class cruiser

Arethusa-class cruiser
Avenger-class aircraft carrier
Campania-class aircraft carrier
Edinburgh-class cruiser
Erebus-class monitor
Gloucester-class cruiser
Kent-class cruiser (excluding HMS Kent)
Perth-class cruiser
Swiftsure-class cruiser
York-class cruiser

Argus-class aircraft carrier
Bellona-class cruiser
Danae-class cruiser
Effingham-class cruiser
Fiji-class cruiser
Hawkins-class cruiser
Leander-class cruiser
Pretoria castle-class aircraft carrier
T-class submersible

Priority Level: Raid
Ark Royal-class aircraft carrier
Eagle-class aircraft carrier
Illustrious-class aircraft carrier
Southampton-class cruiser
Unicorn-class aircraft carrier

Colossus-class aircraft carrier
Furious-class aircraft carrier
Indomitable-class aircraft carrier
Surrey-class cruiser
Yorkshire-class cruiser

Courageous-class aircraft carrier
HMS Kent (not the Kent-class)
Norfolk-class cruiser
Swiftsure-class cruiser

Priority Level: Battle
Audacious-class fleet aircraft carrier
Hood-class battlecruiser (refit)
Queen Elizabeth-class battleship
Renown-class battlecruiser (refit)
HMS Warspite battleship

G3 class battlecruiser
Implacable-class aircraft carrier
Queen Elizabeth/Barham-class battleship
Resolution-class battleship

Hood-class battlecruiser
Nelson-class battleship
Renown-class battlecruiser
Vanguard-class battlecruiser

Priority Level: War
King George V-class battleship
N3 class Battleship

Lion-class battleship

Malta-class aircraft carrier

Special Rules

The additional special rule is applied to fleets of the Royal Navy.
Hedgehog/Double Squid: As the war continued the continual threat of U-boats led to the development of new weapons being
deployed. The Hedgehog and Double Squid were both highly effective and use the same rules as depth charges, but are fired into
a ship’s forward firing arc only.

Activity-class Escort Carrier

Patrol

Ships of this class: Activity

Whereas Audacity was essentially nothing more than a transport with a flat deck, Activity was
in many ways the prototype for the later CVE carriers, with a hangar and lift added as well as
a flight deck. Aircraft capacity was as high as 18 depending on type. She survived the war and
reverted to mercantile status in 1946.
Speed: 4”
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 15/5
Crew: 28/9

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 512 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier, Radar
In Service: 1942
Aircraft: 2 flight of Fairey Swordfish, 1 flight of Martlets
Range
14
5

AD
1
2

DD
1


Displacement: 14,250 tons

Speed: 18 kts.

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Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Special
Slow-Loading, Weak

Crew: 700

Ameer-class Escort Carrier

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Ameer, Emperor, Khedive, Nabob, Queen, Ranee, Ruler, Smiter, Thane
These ships were an improvement of the Attacker-class, and they proved to be tough little
ships. Nabob was torpedoed by U-354, a hit which blew a 150 foot hole in the side of the ship.
Despite this, she sailed over 1,000 miles to safety under her own power.
Speed: 4”
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 16/5
Crew: 26/8

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 496 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier, Radar
In Service: 1943
Aircraft: 3 flights of Fairey Swordfish or 4 flights of Grumman Avengers, 1 flight of Martlets
Range
12
5

AD
1
7

DD
1


Displacement: 15,646 tons

Special
Slow-Loading, Weak


Speed: 18 kts.

Crew: 646

Archer-class Escort Carrier

Patrol

Ships of this class: Archer

Archer was yet another mercantile conversion. She was plagued with mechanical problems
and was taken into reserve and used only as an accommodation vessel in Scottish waters.
Armour: 2+
Damage: 13/4
Crew: 23/7

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 492 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier, Radar
In Service: 1942
Aircraft: 2 flights of Swordfish, 1 flight of Martlets
Range
12
5

AD
1
2

DD
1


Displacement: 12,860 tons

Speed: 16.5 kts.

The Royal Navy

Speed: 3”
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Special
Weak

Crew: 555

Arethusa-class Cruiser

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Arethusa, Aurora, Galatea, Penelope
Based upon the Perth-class, the Arethusa-class was designed to be the smallest possible
‘useful’ cruiser. Design flaws meant they were vulnerable to torpedo hits in the machinery
spaces but otherwise they were a successful class.
Speed: 7”
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 8/2
Crew: 20/6

Weapon
A Turret (2 x 6 in)
B Turret (2 x 6 in)
X Turret (2 x 6 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 506 ft.

Special Traits: Agile, Aircraft 1, Radar
In Service: 1935

Range
26
26
26
14
5
10
10
Displacement: 7,400 tons

AD
1
1
1
2
3
2
2

DD
1
1
1
1

4
4
Speed: 32.7 kts.

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Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Special
Weak
Weak
Weak
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 500

Argus-class Fleet Carrier

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Argus

Converted from the Italian liner Conte Rosso in 1917, she sported a famous zebra stripe
camouflage scheme in the First World War. She went into reserve, but was recalled to front
line service as British carrier as losses mounted during the first full year of World War II.
Speed: 4”
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 16/5
Crew: 17/5

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 576 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier
In Service: 1918 (1942 as shown)
Aircraft: 2 flight of Fairey Swordfish, 1 flight of Fairey Fulmars
Range
14
5

AD
1
2

DD
1


Displacement: 15,750 tons

Special
Slow-Loading, Weak


Speed: 21 kts.

Crew: 401

Attacker-class Escort Carrier

Skirmish

The Royal Navy

Ships of this class: Attacker, Chaser, Fencer, Hunter, Pursuer, Stalker, Tracker
These were US-built CVEs, supplied under the Lend Lease agreement. Their entry into
service was delayed as a result of the explosion that sank HMS Dasher – their fuel systems
were redesigned and refitted along British lines for improved fuel handling safety. These
carriers served in three major roles: trade protection carrier (ASW-equipped ships), assault
carrier (strike/CAP for invasion support), and transport.
Speed: 4”
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 15/5
Crew: 26/8

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 496 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier, Radar
In Service: 1942
Aircraft: 3 flights of Fairey Swordfish or Avengers, 1 flight of Martlets
Range
14
5

AD
1
2

DD
1


Displacement: 14,630 tons

Speed: 18.5 kts.

Special
Slow-Loading, Weak

Crew: 646

Audacious-class Fleet Aircraft Carrier

Battle

Ships of this class: Ark Royal, Audacious, Eagle

The Audacious-class (more correctly referred to as the Eagle-class, but using the alternate
term to avoid confusion with the earlier carrier of the same name) were the last armoured
deck carriers designed for the Royal Navy. The end of the war saw Audacious being cancelled
while Ark Royal and Eagle formed the core of the post war Royal Navy carrier fleet.
Speed: 6”
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Armour: 3+
Special Traits: Armoured Deck, Carrier, Radar
Damage: 44/14 In Service: 1947
Crew: 110/36 Aircraft: 4 flights of Fairey Barracuda, 4 Flights of Grumman Avenger, 6 flights of
Supermarine Seafire Mk47

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 804 ft.

Range
14
8

AD
4
12

DD
1


Displacement: 49,950tons

Speed: 32 kts.

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Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Special
Slow-Loading, Weak

Crew: 2,740

Audacity-class Escort Carrier

Patrol

Ships of this class: Audacity

Audacity was the prototype escort carrier. Formerly (and ironically) the ex-German transport Hannover, she was fitted with a
flight deck on which her aircraft sat (there were no hangars of lifts). She was sunk on December 21st 1942 by three torpedoes
fired from U-751.
Speed: 3”
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 11/3
Crew: 12/4

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 467 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier
In Service: 1941
Aircraft: 1 flight of Grumman Martlets
Range
14
5

AD
1
2

DD
1


Displacement: 11,000 tons

Special
Slow-Loading, Weak


Speed: 15 kts.

Crew: 300

Avenger-class Escort Carrier

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Avenger, Biter, Dasher

Speed: 3”
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 16/5
Crew: 23/7

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 492 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier, Radar
In Service: 1942
Aircraft: 2 flights of Fairey Swordfish, 1 flight of Hawker Sea Hurricanes
Range
14
5

AD
1
2

DD
1


Displacement: 15,125 tons

Speed: 16.5 kts.

Special
Weak

Crew: 555

Bellona-class Cruiser

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Bellona, Black Prince, Diadem, Royalist, Spartan
The Bellonas were a development of the Dido-class (and are often confused with them).
They were designed from the outset with only four 5.25” turrets and, by the time of their
construction, the delivery of guns was no longer an issue. Spartan was sunk by a German
Hs-293 guided bomb in January 1944, sinking after an 11 hour effort to save her.
Speed: 6”
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 8/2
Crew: 22/7

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 512 ft.

Special Traits: Agile, Radar
In Service: 1943

Range
24
5
10
10
Displacement: 7,410 tons

AD
4
5
2
2

DD
1

4
4
Speed: 32 kts.

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Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

The Royal Navy

These three ships were converted from US transports. Avenger was torpedoed and sunk
by U-155, while Dasher exploded and sank in controversial circumstances in 1943
(attributed to poor design of the aircraft fuelling systems). Biter was transferred to Free
French command in April 1945 and served as the Dixmude.

Special
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 530

C class Cruiser

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Calypso, Capetown, Caradoc, Cardiff, Ceres
The entry here covers the ‘as designed’ C class cruisers that were not updated to
anti-aircraft cruisers. There were several distinct groups, but all shared the same basic
characteristics with only minor changes in dimensions.
Speed: 6”
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 5/1
Crew: 14/4

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 450 ft.

Special Traits: Radar
In Service: 1916

Range
22
5
10
10

AD
2
3
2
2

DD
1

4
4

Displacement: 4,950 tons

Speed: 29 kts.

Special
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 334

Campania-class Escort Carrier

Skirmish

The Royal Navy

Ships of this class: Campania

Campania was similar to the Vindex-class escort carriers. Her Swordfish aircraft sank
U-365 in December 1944, and after the war she served in an unusual role as a mobile
exhibition in the Festival of Britain. She also served as the UK command ship for
atomic bomb tests in the Pacific.
Speed: 3”
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 16/5
Crew: 28/9

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 524 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier, Radar
In Service: 1944
Aircraft: 2 flight of Fairey Swordfish, 1 flight of Martlets
Range
14
5

AD
1
3

DD
1


Displacement: 15,970 tons

Special
Slow-Loading, Weak


Speed: 16 kts.

Crew: 700

Colossus-class Light Aircraft Carrier

Ships of this class: Colossus, Glory, Ocean, Venerable, Vengeance, Theseus, Triumph, Warrior, Perseus, Pioneer
This class of light fleet carriers had an almost fragile appearance, and resembled smaller
versions of the Illustrious-class. They were based on mercantile construction techniques,
and thus were quick to build (the first of class went from concept to completion in
about a year).
Speed: 5”
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 19/6
Crew: 52/17

Weapon
AA
Length: 695 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier, Radar
In Service: 1944
Aircraft: 3 flights of Fairey Barracudas, 3 flights
of Vought Corsairs
Range
5

AD
4

DD


Displacement: 18,300 tons

Speed: 25 kts.

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Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Special

Crew: 1,300

Raid

Courageous-class Aircraft Carrier

Raid

Ships of this class: Courageous, Glorious

Courageous and Glorious were half sisters to Furious, and began their lives as 15”
armed Large Light Cruisers. Courageous formed the centrepiece of a carrier anti
submarine force but was herself torpedoed and sunk by U-29 in 1939. Glorious
was sunk by gunfire from Scharnhorst and Gneisenau, while ferrying RAF aircraft
back from Norway in 1940
Speed: 6”
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 28/9
Crew: 49/16

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 786 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier
In Service: 1928 (1940 as shown)
Aircraft: 5 flights of Fairey Swordfish, 3 flights of Sea Gladiators
Range
12
5

AD
3
6

Displacement: 27,560 tons

DD
1

Speed: 30.5 kts.

Special
Weak

Crew: 1,216

Coventry-class AA Cruiser

Patrol

Ships of this class: Coventry, Curlew

Speed: 6”
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 5/1
Crew: 14/4

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 452 ft.

Special Traits: Radar
In Service: 1916

Range
20
5

AD
3
6

Displacement: 4,950 tons

DD
1

Speed: 29 kts.

Special
Weak

Crew: 330

Curacoa-class AA Cruiser

Patrol

Ships of this class: Cairo, Calcutta, Carlisle, Curacoa
Another anti-aircraft cruiser conversion of the C-class cruiser, only eight 4” AA guns were
shipped instead of the ten for the others. Carlisle served in the Mediterranean and took part
in the battle of Cape Matapan. Curacoa was engaged in convoy escort work in the North
Atlantic. She was sunk in a night-time collision with the liner Queen Mary in 1942, being
sliced in half. The crew of the liner were unaware of the incident until some time later.
Speed: 6”
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 5/1
Crew: 14/4

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 452 ft.

Special Traits: Radar
In Service: 1916

Range
20
5
Displacement: 4,950 tons

AD
2
5

DD
1

Speed: 29 kts.

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Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

The Royal Navy

Coventry and Curlew were refitted as AA cruisers, changing their cruiser armament for
ten 4” AA guns and numerous smaller weapons. Coventry and Curlew both fell victim
to an air attacks.

Special
Weak

Crew: 330

Danae-class Cruiser

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Danae, Dauntless, Delhi, Despatch, Diomede, Dunedin, Durban
The ships of the Danae-class were based on the preceding C class design, but lengthened to include
an additional 6” gun. They were generally given less glamorous, but nonetheless important,
assignments, often freeing the bigger and more capable ships for more stressing duties.
Speed: 6”
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 6/2
Crew: 19/6

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 472 ft.

Special Traits: Radar
In Service: 1916

Range
20
5
10
10

AD
3
3
3
3

DD
1

4
4

Displacement: 5,925 tons

Speed: 29 kts.

Special
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 469

Delhi-class AA Cruiser

Patrol

The Royal Navy

Ships of this class: Delhi

Delhi was a Danae-class vessel converted into an AA cruiser while in refit in the USA. It was
planned to refit other ships in this manner but the conversion was quite expensive, so Delhi
became a one off. She served mainly in the Atlantic and Mediterranean
Speed: 6”
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 6/2
Crew: 19/6

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 472 ft.

Special Traits: Radar
In Service: 1916

Range
22
5

AD
12
3

DD
1


Displacement: 5,925 tons

Speed: 29 kts.

Special
Weak

Crew: 469

Dido-class Cruiser (1st Group)

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Argonaut, Cleopatra, Euralyus, Hermione, Naiad, Sirius
The Dido-class was intended to be the Royal Navy’s equivalent of the US Atlanta-class antiaircraft cruiser. They were designed around five 5.25” dual purpose turrets of the same type used
on the KGV class battleships as secondary armament.
Speed: 6”
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 8/2
Crew: 22/7

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 512 ft.

Special Traits: Agile, Radar
In Service: 1940

Range
24
5
10
10

AD
5
5
2
2

DD
1

4
4

Displacement: 7,575 tons

Speed: 32.2 kts.

42
Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Special
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 530

Dido-class Cruiser (2nd Group)

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Bonaventure, Dido, Phoebe
These three ships of the Dido-class were affected by the shortages of available 5.25” guns. They only shipped
four turrets instead of five and carried additional light armament as compensation. Dido received her 5th
5.25” turret in 1942.
Speed: 6”
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 8/2
Crew: 22/7

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 512 ft.

Special Traits: Agile, Radar
In Service: 1940

Range
24
5
10
10

AD
4
5
2
2

Displacement: 7,575 tons

DD
1

4
4
Speed: 32.2 kts.

Special
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 530

Dido-class Cruiser (3rd Group)

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Charybdis, Scylla

Speed: 6”
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 8/2
Crew: 22/7

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 512 ft.

Special Traits: Agile, Radar
In Service: 1940

Range
21
5
10
10

AD
2
6
2
2

Displacement: 7,575 tons

DD
1

4
4
Speed: 32.2 kts.

Special
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 530

Eagle-class Aircraft Carrier

Raid

Ships of this class: Eagle

Eagle was a conversion of the ex-Chilean battleship Almirante Cochrane. She served in the hunt
for the Graf Spee and then continued operating mainly in the South Atlantic and later in the
Mediterranean. Damaged several times, her aircraft often cross-decked to other Royal Navy
carriers for operations. She was finally sunk by U-73 off Cape Salinas on August 11th 1942.
Speed: 5”
Turning: 1
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 28/9
Crew: 34/11

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 667 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier, Radar, Torpedo Belt
In Service: 1924 (1942 as shown)
Aircraft: 3 flight of Fairey Swordfish, 2 flights of Hawker Sea Hurricanes
Range
15
5

AD
4
2

DD
1


Displacement: 27,229 tons

Speed: 24 kts.

43
Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

The Royal Navy

This third batch of Dido-class cruisers were completed with 4.5” dual purpose guns instead of 5.25”
guns. Nicknamed the ‘toothless terrors’ by their crews, they actually proved to be better anti-aircraft
cruisers than their 5.25” equipped siblings.

Special
Weak

Crew: 1,087

Effingham-class Cruiser

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Effingham

Effingham served in the North Atlantic at the outbreak of World War II, taking part in several hunts
for German surface raiders. She took an active role in the Norwegian campaign, bombarding shore
positions and escorting convoys. She ran aground near Bodo and she was abandoned and sunk.
Speed: 6”
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 13/4
Crew: 29/9

Weapon
Secondary Armament (6”)
Secondary Armament (4”)
AA
Length: 605 ft.

Special Traits:
In Service: 1919

Range
20
14
5

AD
4
2
3

DD
1
1


Displacement: 12,800 tons

Special
Weak
Weak


Speed: 30 kts.

Crew: 712

Erebus-class Monitor

Skirmish

The Royal Navy

Ships of this class: Erebus, Terror
Erebus and Terror were earlier World War One era monitors. Apart from their age they were
similar in design and operation to the later Roberts class. In February 1941,HMS Terror was
damaged by Luftwaffe Stukas off Benghazi and sank while under tow to Alexandria.
Speed: 3”
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 5+
Damage: 9/3
Crew: 13/4

Weapon
A Turret (2 x 15 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 405 ft.

Special Traits: Armoured Deck, Radar, Torpedo Belt
In Service: 1916

Range
26
12
5

AD
2
2
3

DD
3
1


Displacement: 8,450 tons

Speed: 13 kts.

Special
AP
Weak

Crew: 315

Emerald-class Cruiser

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Emerald, Enterprise
Emerald served in the Indian Ocean until commencing a long refit in 1942. On completion she rejoined
the Eastern Fleet and supported the Normandy landings. Enterprise, along with the cruiser Glasgow, sank
three German destroyers and damaged four more in the Bay of Biscay during December 1943.
Speed: 7”
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 10/3
Crew: 23/7

Weapon
Secondary Armament (6”)
Secondary Armament (4”)
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 570 ft.

Special Traits: Aircraft 1, Radar (1943)
In Service: 1926

Range
22
14
5
10
10

AD
3
1
2
4
4

DD
1
1

4
4

Displacement: 9,435 tons

Speed: 33 kts.

44
Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Special
Weak
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 572

Fiji-class Cruiser (Ceylon Group)

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Ceylon, Newfoundland, Uganda
As the war progressed, the threat from enemy surface forces declined, while the air threat increased greatly.
Three ships of the Fiji-class swapped one of their triple 6” gun turrets for more anti aircraft armament.
Speed: 6”
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 11/3
Crew: 39/13

Weapon
A Turret (3 x 6 in)
B Turret (3 x 6 in)
Y Turret (3 x 6 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 555 ft.

Special Traits: Aircraft 2, Radar
In Service: 1940

Range
26
26
26
12
5
10
10

AD
1
1
1
2
4
2
2

DD
1
1
1
1

4
4

Displacement: 10,450 tons

Special
Twin-Linked, Weak
Twin-Linked, Weak
Twin-Linked, Weak
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot

Speed: 31.5 kts.

Crew: 980

Flower-class Corvette

Patrol

Speed: 4”
Turning: 3
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 3/1
Crew: 4/1

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Hedgehog
Depth Charges
Length: 205 ft.

Special Traits: Agile, Radar, Sub Hunter
In Service: 1941+

Range
8
5
4
3

AD
1
1
4
3

Displacement: 950 tons

DD
1

4
3

Special
Weak

Slow Loading, Super AP
Slow-Loading

Speed: 16 kts.

Crew: 85

Furious-class Aircraft Carrier

Raid

Ships of this class: Furious

Furious began life as a large Light Cruiser armed but was converted into an aircraft carrier.
Despite her age she saw extensive service in the Atlantic, Mediterranean and the Norwegian
Sea where she took part in air strikes against the Tirpitz.
Speed: 6”
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 29/9
Crew: 49/16

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 786 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier, Radar, Torpedo Belt
In Service: 1917 (1942 as shown)
Aircraft: 3 flights of Fairey Swordfish, 3 flights of Fairey Fulmars
Range
14
5

AD
3
7

DD
1


Displacement: 28,500 tons

Speed: 29.35 kts.

45
Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Special
Weak

Crew: 1,218

The Royal Navy

The short, stubby Flower-class corvette served all over the world. The combination of asdic and radar, combined with depth
charges and a good hull form made them excellent U boat hunters during the worst battles of the North Atlantic campaign.

G3 class Battlecruiser

Battle

Ships of this class: Invincible, Indomitable, Inflexible, Indefatigable

The G3 battlecruisers were a victim of the Washington Treaty (earning them the nickname the ‘Cherrytrees’). Their arrangement
was similar to the N3 design, substituting 16” guns for 18” and enjoying a significant increase in maximum speed. The turret
designs eventually saw service in the Nelson-class.
Speed: 6”
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Armour: 6+
Special Traits: Aircraft 2, Armoured Deck, Radar after 1941, Torpedo Belt
Damage: 43/14 In Service: Not Completed
Crew: 67/22

Weapon
A Turret (3 x 16 in)
B Turret (3 x 16 in)
P Turret (3 x 16 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 862 ft.

Range
36
36
36
16
5

AD
3
3
3
6
12

DD
3
3
3
1


Displacement: 48,400 tons

Special
AP
AP
AP
Weak


Speed: 32 kts.

Crew: 1,680

Hawkins-class Cruiser

Skirmish

The Royal Navy

Ships of this class: Frobisher, Hawkins,
The Hawkins-class was based on the earlier Birmingham-class cruiser. Hawkins served
mainly in the Indian Ocean, and Frobisher worked in Home waters and supported the
Normandy landings. They were relegated to the reserve fleet in 1945.
Speed: 6”
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 13/4
Crew: 29/9

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 605 ft.

Special Traits: Radar
In Service: 1919

Range
22
5
10
10

AD
4
6
2
2

DD
1

4
4

Displacement: 12,800 tons

Speed: 30 kts.

Special

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 712

Hermes-class Fleet Carrier

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Hermes

Hermes was the first ship designed from the outset as an aircraft carrier. She was obsolete by the start of World War II and mostly
served in the South Atlantic. She was sunk north of Ceylon by over 70 Japanese carrier aircraft on April 9th, 1942 .
Speed: 5 ”
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 14/4
Crew: 28/8

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 600 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier
In Service: 1923 (1942 as shown)
Aircraft: 2 flights of Fairey Swordfish
Range
14
5

AD
3
1

DD
1


Displacement: 13,208 tons

Speed: 25 kts.

46
Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Special
Weak

Crew: 700

Hood-class Battlecruiser (Refit)

Battle

Ships of this class: Hood

The shortcomings of Hood’s design were readily apparent by the end of the Great War.
It was intended to reconstruct her during the inter war period, however her role as fleet
flagship meant she saw almost continuous service during that period. As a result her rebuild
was continually postponed until the eve of the Second World War, by which point it was
too late. Had her refit gone through, the entire secondary battery would have been replaced
with that similar to the KGV’s, the anti-aircraft capability would have been significantly
improved, and additional deck armour provided.
Speed: 6”
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Armour: 5+
Special Traits: Armoured Deck, Radar, Torpedo Belt
Damage: 42/14 In Service: 1942
Crew: 76/25

Weapon
A Turret (2 x 15 in)
B Turret (2 x 15 in)
X Turret (2 x 15 in)
Y Turret (2 x 15 in)
Secondary Armament
AA

AD
2
2
2
2
5
11

DD
3
3
3
3
1


Displacement: 46,680 tons

Speed: 31 kts.

Special
AP
AP
AP
AP
Weak

Crew: 1,900

Hunt-class Destroyer Escort

Patrol

Ships of this Class: Atherstone, Berkeley, Cattistock, Cleveland, Cotswold
The Hunt-class was designed to fulfil the role of heavy convoy escort, optimised for AA and
ASW defence. As such, they were smaller and slower than their fleet cousins and initially carried
no torpedoes. The Type 1 vessels were the victims of a design error that saw a third of their
main armament landed to compensate for errors in the calculation of stability. They were used
extensively to cover convoys in Home waters and the Mediterranean, and were also called in to
act in more traditional destroyer roles.
Speed: 5”
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 3/1
Crew: 7/2

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Depth Charges
Length: 264 ft.

Special Traits: Agile, Radar, Sub Hunter
In Service: 1941+

Range
12
5
3
Displacement: 1,625 tons

AD
1
2
4

DD
1

2
Speed: 27 kts.

47
Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Special
Weak

Slow-Loading
Crew: 168

The Royal Navy

Length: 860 ft.

Range
33
33
33
33
16
5

Implacable-class Aircraft Carrier

Battle

Ships of this class: Implacable, Indefatigable

The Implacables were a further extension of the Illustrious design which again attempted to increase
aircraft capacity. Initial operating groups were less than 60 aircraft, though a year later would see
air groups rising to over 80 aircraft. Limitations on hangar height meant that they were unable
to operate Corsairs and would ultimately lead to short service lives. Indefatigable was one of the
success stories of the armoured deck. On 1st April 1945 she was hit at the base of the superstructure
by a bomb carrying kamikaze aircraft. The armoured deck withstood the damage and she was
cleared for air operations a few hours later after the debris had been swept over the side.
Speed: 6”
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 32/10
Crew: 92/30

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 766 ft.

Special Traits: Armoured Deck, Carrier, Radar
In Service: 1944
Aircraft: 4 flights of Fairey Barracuda, 4 Flights of Supermarine Seafires, 2 flights of Fairey Firefly
Range
14
5

AD
4
10

DD
1


Displacement: 32,110 tons

Special
Weak


Speed: 32 kts.

Crew: 2,250

Indomitable-class Aircraft Carrier

Raid

The Royal Navy

Ships of this class: Indomitable

Indomitable was planned as the 4th ship of the Illustrious-class, but her design was altered to increase aircraft storage
space. Less armour was carried and her flight deck was raised by 14 feet to accommodate a second hangar deck. This
allowed her to carry 45 aircraft initially, increased to over 60 once revised aircraft handling practices and more space
efficient aircraft were put in place.
Speed: 6”
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Armour: 3+
Special Traits: Armoured Deck, Carrier, Radar
Damage: 30/10 In Service: 1941 (1942 as shown)
Crew: 64/21
Aircraft: 4 flights of Fairey Albacore, 6 flights of Grumman Martlets

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 754 ft.

Range
14
5

AD
4
9

DD
1


Displacement: 29,730 tons

Speed: 31 kts.

Special
Weak

Crew: 1,600

Kent-class Cruiser

Ships of this class: Australia, Berwick, Canberra, Cornwall, Cumberland, Kent, Suffolk
The Kent-class was the Royal Navy’s first group of County class heavy cruisers. Five were built for
the Royal Navy, and two for the Royal Australian Navy. They experienced mixed careers; Cornwall
was sunk by Japanese dive bombers off Ceylon, and Suffolk suffered heavy bomb damage during the
Norway campaign (she was repaired and took part in the hunt for the Bismarck). Australia was hit by
six kamikazes but survived, while Canberra was scuttled after the battle of Savo Island in 1942.
Kent was less extensively altered then the others of her class and her statistics, where different, are
shown in parenthesis.
Speed: 6”
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 15/5
Crew: 31/10

Special Traits: Aircraft 3 (1), Radar
In Service: 1928 (1942 as shown)

48
Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Skirmish

Weapon
A Turret (2 x 8 in)
B Turret (2 x 8 in)
X Turret (2 x 8 in)
Y Turret (2 x 8 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes (Kent Only)
Starboard Torpedoes (Kent Only)
Length: 633 ft.

Range
31
31
31
31
14
5
10
10

AD
1
1
1
1
2 (1)
3 (2)
2
2

DD
1
1
1
1
1

4
4

Displacement: 14,910 tons

Special




Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot

Speed: 31.5 kts.

Crew: 784

Lion-class Battleship

War

Ships of this class: Lion, Temeraire, Conqueror, Thunderer

The Lions were essentially a repeat of the King George V-class design, substituting the twin/quad 14” gun arrangement for triple
16” turrets and incorporating some other improvements. Four vessels were planned and the first two were under construction at
the start of the war. However, the priority for construction was for cruisers, carriers and smaller warships so all four were cancelled
in October 1940. Some studies were conducted examining the possibility of using the incomplete hulls for aircraft carriers and
even at hybrid battleship/carriers but these were abandoned when it was realised that new construction was a more efficient route
to follow.
Armour: 6+
Special Traits: Aircraft 2, Armoured Deck, Radar, Torpedo Belt
Damage: 40/13 In Service: Not Completed
Crew: 67/22

Weapon
A Turret (3 x 16 in)
B Turret (3 x 16 in)
X Turret (3 x 16 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 785 ft.

Range
41
41
41
16
5

AD
3
3
3
5
12

DD
3
3
3
1


Displacement: 46,300 tons

The Royal Navy

Speed: 6”
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Special
Super AP
Super AP
Super AP
Weak


Speed: 30 kts.

Crew: 1,680

Loch-class Frigate

Patrol

The Loch Class was the Royal Navy’s ultimate sub hunter in World War II and was also used by
the Canadian, South African and New Zealand navies. Armed with two Squid launchers, advanced
sonar and a powerful short range radar the Loch was a formidable enemy for U boats.
Speed: 4”
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 3/1
Crew: 5/1

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Double Squid
Depth Charges
Length: 307 ft.

Special Traits: Agile, Radar, Sub Hunter
In Service: 1943+

Range
8
5
4
3
Displacement: 1,433 tons

AD
1
1
6
4

DD
1

4
2
Speed: 20 kts.

49
Jean-Louis FAUCHON (order #5116343)

Special
Weak

Super AP
Slow-Loading
Crew: 114


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