Fichier PDF

Partage, hébergement, conversion et archivage facile de documents au format PDF

Partager un fichier Mes fichiers Convertir un fichier Boite à outils PDF Recherche PDF Aide Contact



BenFares Nolay .pdf



Nom original: BenFares_Nolay.pdf



Aperçu du document


 
 

Project  in  Applied  Statistics  and  Econometrics:  

 
What  is  the  impact  of  immigration  on  
wage  level  in  France?  
BEN  FARES  Mouad  
NOLAY  Matthieu  
2015  
 
M1  Aix  Marseille  School  of  Economics  
Mr.  SEVESTRE  Patrick  
 

 

 

1  

I)

Introduction:  

Immigration   is   a   very   old   phenomenon.   Thousands   of   years   ago,   people   were   already  
moving   from   one   land   to   another   in   order   to   flight   the   persecution   of   another  
population,  research  a  better  place  to  live,  discover  new  land  etc…  Today,  immigration  is  
more  newsworthy  than  ever  since  immigration  is  facilitated  by  the  great  progress  of  the  
transportation  industry,  the  globalization  and  the  borders  opening.  But  the  reasons  have  
not  really  changed  often  immigration  is  guided  by  the  hope  of  a  better  life,  by  escaping  
from  war,  persecution  (religious,  ethnic,  etc…)  and  numerous  other  reasons.  
In  France,  the  immigration  phenomena  increase  after  the  revolution.  France  becomes  a  
host  country  at  the  same  time  that  a  land  of  liberty  and  right  for  all.  But  it’s  in  the  last  
century  that  immigration  accelerates.  After  the  First  World  War,  France  is  destroyed  and  
had  lost  a  great  part  of  his  work  force.  In  order  to  rebuild  the  country  quickly,  a  mass  
immigration  is  organized.  The  same  mechanism  will  be  used  after  World  War  2.  
During  the  thirty  year  of  post-­‐war  economic  growth,  immigration  is  not  a  problem,  it’s  
the   beginning   of   the   consumerism   society   and   industries   are   thriving.   But   lately   the  
economic  situation  had  known  more  recession  than  durable  growth  and  immigration  is  
less  and  less  welcomed  in  most  of  developed  countries.  
Immigration   policies   and   issues   are   often   at   the   heart   of   debates.   Government,  
candidates,   and   electors   take   it   very   seriously.   Many   opinions   diverge   about  
immigration.   Some   claiming   that   immigration   has   positive   effects   on   the   country’s  
economic  situation  and  growth.  Other,  asserting  that  immigrant  worsens  the  country’s  
labor   market   by   decreasing   the   wage   level   and   increasing   unemployment   for   native  
workers.   The   rest   think   that   immigration   has   a   small   impact   on   labor   market   maybe  
even  insignificant,  or  they  have  no  opinion  on  the  matter.  
Lately,   a   lot   of   studies   tried   to   unveil   this   complex   phenomenon.   But   here   too,   the  
conclusions  are  not  always  similar.  
 

 

 

2  

Normally,  if  you  just  consider  the  law  of  supply  and  demand,  an  arrival  of  immigrants  on  
the   labor   force   market   should   increase   the   supply   of   labor   and   lower   the   price   and   in  
this   case   the   wage   level.   At   least,   this   is   true   if   you   observe   comparable   segments   of  
population.  

 
Figure  1:  The  law  of  supply  and  demand.  
I-­‐

We  can  observe  the  impact  on  prices  of  an  increase  in  demand  (price  goes  up).  

II-­‐

We  can  observe  the  impact  on  prices  of  an  increase  in  supply  (price  goes  down).  This  graph  is  
the  one  that  represent  theoretically  immigration  by  the  law  of  demand  and  supply.  

Indeed,  an  important  parameter  to  consider  for  studying  the  impact  of  immigration  on  
wage  level  is  that  the  effect  of  immigration  can  be  measured  only  at  equivalent  level  of  
skills,  experience,  study,  sector  and  profession.  
Empirically,   studies   made   before   the   21th   century   have   encounter   some   difficulties   to  
prove  a  sizable  negative  effect  on  wage  level  as  expected  by  the  theoretical  implication  
of   supply   and   demand   law.   For   example,   Friedberg   and   Hunt   (1995),   Smith   and  
Edmonston  (1997),  Borjas  (1994),  and  Lalonde  and  Topel  (1996)  all  concluded  that  the  
impact   of   immigration   on   wage   level   of   native   workers   is   small.   These   studies   were  
exploiting  the  geographical  clustering  of  immigrants,  separating  them  into  different  local  
labor   market   in   order   to   identify   the   effect   on   wage   level.   as   have   said   Carrasco   (2008)   :  
“Most   of   the   previous   studies   suggest   that,   at   most,   a   10%   increase   in   the   fraction   of  
immigrants  reduces  the  wages  of  native  workers  by  about  1%.”    

 

3  

Borjas   (2003)   criticize   this   approach.   He   explains   that   the   problem   of   these   studies   is  
that   they   ignore   “the   strong   economics   currents   that   tend   to   equalize   economic  
conditions  across  cities  and  regions”1.  He  proposes  a  new  approach  based  on  the  Human  
Capital   theory.   He   argues   that:   “by   paying   closer   attention   to   the   characteristics   that  
define   a   skill   group   one   can   make   substantial   progress   in   determining   whether  
immigration  influences  the  employment  and  earnings  opportunities  of  native  workers”2.  
Borjas   (2003)   used   an   approach   focusing   on   correlations   across   skill   groups   (using  
education  and  labor  market  as  indicators  of  skills)  and  with  this  approach,  Borjas  (2003)  
found  that  a  10%  increase  in  a  skill  group  lowers  that  wage  of  that  group  by  2  to  3%.  
Nevertheless,   during   the   last   decade,   a   big   number   of   immigrants   have   arrived   to  
Europe;  As  a  result,  many  European  countries  have  received  immigrants  coming  from  all  
over   the   world,   (especially   from   North   Africa   for   France   and   Spain).   Thus,   the   need   of  
studies   analyzing   the   impact   of   immigration   on   wages   of   natives’   workers   in   many  
European  countries  has  notably  increased.  
The  empirical  analysis  uses  the  data  of  the  annual  “Enquête  Emploi”  conducted  in  2012  
by  l’INSEE  (Institut  National  de  la  Statistique  ET  des  Etudes  Economiques).  
 

 

 

4  

II)

Data  

We  use  in  this  study  the  empirical  database  “enquête  emploi  2012”13  (labor  force  survey  
2012)  by  INSEE.  This  panel  study  furnishes  evidence  data  about  profession,  activity  per  
sex,  age,  and  nationality,  working  hours,  type  of  employment  and  contracts,  and  wages.  
The   study   was   realized   over   the   full   year   of   2012   by   interrogating   several   times   the  
individuals  concerned.  The  only  restriction  of  this  study  is  that  the  people  interrogated  
must  be  more  than  15  years  old.  
The  labor  force  survey  contains  over  560  variables  and  about  422  000  observations.  We  
choose  only  46  variables  in  order  to  conduct  our  study  (details  about  chosen  variables  in  
the  appendices).  

The  dependent  variable  
In  order  to  measure  the  impact  of  immigrants  on  the  wage  level  of  native  workers,  our  
dependent   variable   will   be   of   course   the   wage   of   native   workers.   To   keep   only   the   wage  
level  of  native’s  workers  we  discarded  all  immigrants’  wage  in  our  database.  
We  think  that  it  will  be  more  significant  to  focus  on  hourly  wage  to  measure  the  impact  
of   immigration.   We   decide   also   to   use   a   logarithm   on   our   dependent   variable,   because  
we   want   to   show   how   the   variables   selected   in   the   model   explain   the   wage   level   and  
more   especially   if   the   variable   immigration   have   a   strong   impact   or   not.   The   log   will  
allow  us  to  make  statements  about  the  impact  of  the  explanatory  variables  more  easily.  
We  define  the  variable  “hourly_wage”  and  create  “logW”  as  follow:    
𝐻𝑜𝑢𝑟𝑙𝑦𝑤𝑎𝑔𝑒 =

𝑠𝑎𝑙𝑚𝑒𝑒
 
𝑛𝑏ℎ𝑒𝑢𝑟

𝐿𝑜𝑔𝑊 = log  (ℎ𝑜𝑢𝑟𝑙𝑦𝑤𝑎𝑔𝑒)  

The  explanatory  variables  
Education  level:  
The   education   level   is   an   important   explanatory   variable   in   order   to   define   the   wage  
level   of   an   individual.   The   Human   Capital   Theory   emphasizes   that   education   and  
experience  are  the  two  main  variables  that  explain  the  wage  of  an  individual.  It’s  pretty  

 

5  

obvious  that  different  level  of  education  will  conduct  to  different  wage  at  the  beginning  
of  an  individual’s  career.  
In  the  “Enquête  emploi  2012”  the  education  level  is  define  in  11  different  categories:  
-­‐

71-­‐  Without  diploma  

-­‐

70-­‐  “Certificat  d’études  primaires”  

-­‐

60-­‐  “Brevet  des  colleges”  

-­‐

50-­‐  CAP/BEP  or  equivalence  

-­‐

41-­‐  Technologic  Baccalaureate  

-­‐

42-­‐  General  Baccalaureate  

-­‐

33-­‐  Paramedical  and  social  (Bac+2)  

-­‐

31-­‐  BTS/DUT  or  equivalence  

-­‐

30-­‐  DEUG  

-­‐

11-­‐  School  level  bachelor  or  more  

-­‐

10-­‐  Bachelor  and  more  (until  Phd)  

We  built  11  dummies  variables  to  represent  each  one  of  the  above  categories.  We  named  
the   dummies   as   follows   Dip_71   (Without   diploma),   Dip_70   (Certificat   d’études  
primaires),   Dip_60   (Brevet   des   colleges),   Dip_50   (CAP/BEP   or   equivalence),   Dip_41  
(Technologic  Baccalaureate),  Dip_42  (General  Baccalaureate),  Dip_33  (Paramedical  and  
social),  Dip_31  (BTS/DUT  or  equivalence),  Dip_30  (DEUG),  Dip_11  (School  level  bachelor  
or  more)  and  Dip_10  (Bachelor  and  more).  
The  experience  
According   to   the   Human   Capital   Theory,   the   experience   is,   as   education,   a   strong  
determinant   of   the   wage   of   an   individual.   Workers   acquire   skills,   competences,   and  
productivity  with  experience;  those  qualities  will  allow  them  to  increase  their  wage.  
We   computed   the   work   experience   (exper)   by   subtracting   the   graduation   date   to   the  
year   of   the   survey.   If   the   individual   has   no   diploma   we   calculated   experience   by  
subtracting  16  to  the  age  because  we  didn’t  had  data  on  the  graduation’s  date  obviously.  
𝑒𝑥𝑝𝑒𝑟 = 𝑎𝑛𝑛𝑒𝑒𝑛𝑢𝑚 − 𝑑𝑎𝑡𝑑𝑖𝑝𝑛𝑢𝑚  
if  Dip11  =  71  then  exper  =  age_num  -­‐  16  
 

 

6  

The  immigration:  
Immigration   is   the   variable   we   are   interested   in.   It’s   its   impact   on   wage   that   we   want   to  
capture.  As  Borjas  (2003)  explain,  the  immigration  will  not  affect  the  all  labor  force  but  
small   labor   force   with   correspondent   level   of   education.   We   think   also   that   the   sector  
and  the  function  are  important  to  define  small  labor  forces.  
First   we   try   to   express   immigrants   as   dummy   variable   in   function   of   experience   and  
level   of   education   but   we   couldn’t   get   rid   of   multicollinearity   problems.   So   we   define  
apart  the  level  of  education  as  dummy  and  immigrants  from  their  sector  of  activity  and  
their  profession.  
So   we   cross   the   number   of   immigrant’s   by   their   sector   (variable   NAFG17N1)   and   their  
profession   (variable   QPRC2).   We   create   a   new   variable   by   taking   the   mean   of   this  
crossing3.  

                                                                                                               
1  See  in  the  variables  tables  in  the  appendix  
2  See  in  the  variables  tables  in  the  appendix  
3  Tables  in  the  appendix  
 

7  

III)

The  model  

In  order  to  study  the  impact  of  immigration  on  the  level  of  wages  in  France,  we  focus  on  
the  Human  Capital  Theory  to  define  the  wage  level  (experience  and  education  as  main  
variables.   And   we   add   a   variable   accounting   for   the   number   of   immigrants   per   sector  
and  profession  to  observe  the  impact  of  immigration  on  the  wage  level.  
Log  (HW)  =  B1*Exper  +  B2*Dip_71  +  B3*Dip_70  +  B4*Dip_60  +  B5*Dip_50  +  B6*Dip_42  
+   B7*Dip_41   +   B8*Dip_33   +   B9*Dip_31   +   B10*Dip_30   +   B11*Dip_11   +   B12*Dip_10   +  
B13*Part_des_Immi  +  U  
For   this   model   we   made   the   basic   assumption   under   which   OLS   is   the   Best   Linear  
Unbiased  Estimator  (BLUE):  
-­‐  The  model  is  correctly  specified.  
-­‐  E  (U)  =0.  
-­‐  V  (U)  =  σ2  
-­‐  Explanatory  variables  are  not  random.  
-­‐   Rank   of   X   (the   matrix   of   explanatory   variables)   =   k   (and   not   k+1   because   we  
have  no  intercept  in  the  model)  
After   doing   all   the   test   (Haussman,   Sargan,   White)   we   end   up   with   the   following  
assumptions:  
-­‐

The  model  is  correctly  specified  

-­‐

E  (U)  =  0  

-­‐

Cov  (X/U)  ≠  0  

-­‐

V  (U)  =  Ω2  

-­‐

Explanatory  variables  are  not  random  

-­‐

Rank  of  X  (the  matrix  of  explanatory  variables)  =  k  

With   this   set   of   assumptions   the   best   estimator   is   GMM   that   is   why   we   will   keep   as   a  
final  result  the  estimate  coefficients  of  this  regression.  
 

 

 

8  

•  First  regression:  OLS  (Ordinary  Least  Squares)  
Variables  

Coefficients  
Estimates  

Standard  Error  

P-­‐value  

Exper  

0.009827  

0.000167  

<.0001  

Dip_71  

2.064727  

0.00855  

<.0001  

Dip_70  

1.975084  

0.0133  

<.0001  

Dip_60  

2.134281  

0.00894  

<.0001  

Dip_50

2.16528

0.00674

<.0001

Dip_42

2.253148

0.00670

<.0001

Dip_41

2.289308

0.00840

<.0001

Dip_33

2.452845

0.0103

<.0001

Dip_31

2.414604

0.00661

<.0001

Dip_30

2.421689

0.0182

<.0001

Dip_11

2.790126

0.0116

<.0001

Dip_10

2.572066

0.00643

<.0001

part_des_immi

-0.99426

0.0375

<.0001

 
The  results  obtained  seem  to  be  logical.  
We  have  growing  coefficients  with  respect  to  the  level  of  education,  which  was  expected.  
The   parameter   related   to   experience   is   very   low   which   is   in   contradiction   with   the  
Human  Capital  Theory,  which  describe  this  variable  as  an  important  factor  to  explain  the  
wage’s  level.  For  the  immigration  parameter  as  expected,  we  have  a  negative  coefficient.  
All   the   estimators   are   unbiased   with   a   minimal   variance.   However,   we   will   introduce   an  
instrument   for   each   variable   to   check   the   exogeneity/endogeneity   of   our   model.   Indeed,  
if  the  variables  that  we  use  are  endogenous,  the  coefficients  obtained  with  OLS  will  not  
be  consistent.  That’s  why  we  have  done  a  second  regression  with  2SLS.  

 

9  

•  Second  regression:  2SLS  (2  Stages  Least  Squares)  
Variables

Coefficients  
Estimates  

Standard  Error  

P-­‐value  

Exper

0.006906  

0.00526  

0.1896  

Dip_71

2.131593

0.1675

<.0001

Dip_70

2.888211

1.5523

0.0628

Dip_60

3.027611

0.6177

<.0001

Dip_50

2.064905

0.2512

<.0001

Dip_42

2.873439

0.5882

<.0001

Dip_41

1.65675

0.5630

0.0033

Dip_33

0.828759

1.1705

0.4789

Dip_31

2.184663

0.5411

<.0001

Dip_30

1.371147

1.9254

0.4764

Dip_11

3.0817

0.9469

0.0011

Dip_10

3.414592

0.4217

<.0001

part_des_immi

-1.61895

0.5787

0.0052

 
In   order   to   achieve   a   regression   with   2SLS   we   had   to   find   instruments   for   every  
potentially  endogenous  variable.  
We   choose   the   square   of   the   experience   (Exper2)   as   an   instrumental   variable   to   test   the  
significance   of   the   experience,   and   cspp   and   cspm   to   test   the   level   of   education   (with  
cspp:   “la   catégorie   socio-­‐professionnelle   du   père”   and   cspm:   “la   catégorie   socio-­‐
professionnelle  de  la  mère).  We  created  dummies  for  every  category  of  workers  (1  to  6)  
in  CSPP  and  CSPM.  
In   this   second   regression   with   instrumental   variables,   we   computed   the   Haussman  
statistic   to   test   the   exogeneity/endogeneity   of   our   model.   We   obtained   the   following  
Table  on  SAS:  

 

10  

Hausman's Specification Test Results
Efficace sous H0 Cohérent sous H1 DDL Statistique Pr > Khi-2
OLS

2SLS

13

29.25

0.0060

 
The   statistics   obtain   is   29,25   which   has   to   be   compare   with   the   Khi2   at   13   degrees   of  
freedom  (correspond  to  the  number  of  variables  in  the  model):  
29,25 > 22,36    
𝑄! >   𝐾ℎ𝑖 !   𝑤𝑖𝑡ℎ  5%  𝑜𝑓  𝑝𝑟𝑒𝑐𝑖𝑠𝑖𝑜𝑛  
So  giving  this  results  we  reject  H0  (exogeneity  of  the  model),  and  we  can  conclude  that  
our   model   is   endogenous.   With   endogeneity,   the   estimation   by   OLS   is   biased   and   non  
consistent.  The  estimation  by  2SLS  will  be  biased  but  consistent.  
In   order   to   confirm   the   validity   of   this   estimate   we   need   to   check   the  
homoscedasticity/heteroskedasticity  of  our  model.  To   do   so   we   will   introduce   the   GMM  
estimation.  
 

 

 

11  

Third  regression:  GMM  (Generalized  Method  of  Moments)  
Coefficients  

Variables

Estimates  

Standard  Error  

P-­‐value  

Exper

0.007237  

0.00496  

0.1447  

Dip_71

2.135492

0.1586

<.0001

Dip_70

2.664466

1.4542

0.0669

Dip_60

3.000466

0.5650

<.0001

Dip_50

2.089233

0.2318

<.0001

Dip_42

2.82725

0.5686

<.0001

Dip_41

1.683617

0.5657

0.0029

Dip_33

0.899214

1.2068

0.4562

Dip_31

2.176736

0.5394

<.0001

Dip_30

1.927076

1.8335

0.2933

Dip_11

3.266532

1.0005

0.0011

Dip_10

3.28864

0.4126

<.0001

part_des_immi

-1.62403

0.6138

0.0081

 
The  results  obtain  with  GMM  are  close  to  those  obtain  with  2SLS.    
We  use  the  same  instruments  to  estimate  GMM  than  those  use  to  estimate  2SLS.  
We  conducted  the  White  Test  (homoscedasticity/heteroskedasticity)  with  the  following  
result’s  table  on  SAS:  
Heteroscedasticity Test
Equation Test
logw

White's Test

Statistique DDL Pr > Khi-2 Variables
18594

35

<.0001 Cross of all vars

 
The  statistic  obtain  for  the  White  test  is  18594  which  has  to  be  compared  with  the  Khi2  
at  35  degrees  of  freedom:  

 

12  

18594 > 49,80    
𝑄! >   𝑘ℎ𝑖 !   𝑤ℎ𝑖𝑡ℎ  5%  𝑜𝑓  𝑝𝑟𝑒𝑐𝑖𝑠𝑖𝑜𝑛  
Giving  this  result  we  can  conclude  that  we  have  heteroskedasticity.  With  this  conclusion  
the   better   estimator   for   our   model   will   be   GMM,   so   we   will   keep   the   estimation   by   GMM  
as  our  final  results.  
To   finish   we   conducted   the   Hansen/Sargan   test   to   check   the   validity   of   our   instruments.  
We  obtain  the  following  statistics  on  SAS:  
GMM Test Statistics
Test

DDL Statistic

Overidentifying Restrictions

4

Prob

3.17 0.5298

 
The   statistic   obtain   is   3,17   which   has   to   be   compared   with   the   Khi2   at   4   degrees   of  
freedom  (P-­‐(K+1)  =>  where  P  is  the  number  of  instrumental  variables  in  our  case  16,  k  
is  the  number  of  endogenous  variables  in  our  case  12  we  forget  about  the  +1  because  we  
have  no  intercept  in  our  model):  
3,17   <  9,49  
𝑄! = 𝐾ℎ𝑖 !  (𝑤𝑖𝑡ℎ  5  %  𝑜𝑓  𝑝𝑟𝑒𝑐𝑖𝑠𝑖𝑜𝑛)  
Giving  this  result,  we  can  confirm  our  instruments  as  efficient.  
 

 

 

13  

IV)

V.  Results    

First   of   all,   we   can   remark   that   we   loose   precision   on   most   of   our   coefficients   for   the  
regression  by  2SLS  and  GMM  compare  to  OLS.  
The  coefficients  relative  to  Dip_70,  Dip_33,  Dip_30  are  no  more  significant.  We  suppose  
that  this  result  comes  from  the  fact  that  each  of  these  categories  represents  less  than  5%  
of  the  total  observations4.  
The  coefficient  relative  to  experience  is  also  insignificant.  We  suppose  that  is  due  to  the  
fact   that   we   didn’t   create   categories   for   the   different   level   of   experience.   In   the  
experience  table5,  you  can  see  that  we  have  a  standard  error  of  12,37,  which  mean  that  
the   variance   is   very   strong   (≈144).   We   suppose   that   is   the   reason   why   we   have   non-­‐
significant  estimate  for  the  experience  coefficient.  
About  the  interpretation  of  our  coefficients  we  cannot  conclude  the  real  impact  on  wage  
because  with  a  semi-­‐log  model  as  the  one  we  use,  we  are  suppose  to  be  able  to  say  that  
an  increase  of  1  units  in  our  variables  will  increase/decrease  the  wage  by  B%.  However,  
except   the   coefficient   relative   to   experience,   which   is   insignificant,   all   our   coefficients  
are  superior  to  one.  
But  the  correlation  between  our  coefficients  relative  to  the  diploma’s  level  and  the  wage  
level  is  positive.  The  education  level  seems  to  affect  the  wage  level  positively.  The  more  
important   coefficient   is   the   ones   relative   to   the   highest   level   of   diploma   Dip_10   and  
Dip_11  (Bachelor  and  more).  
We  can  at  least  conclude  that  we  found  a  negative  relation  between  native’s  wage  level  
and   the   number   of   immigrants   respectively   to   the   activity’s   sector   and   profession.  
Unfortunately,  we  can’t  quantify  this  effect  with  certainty.  
 

 

                                                                                                               
4  See  the  table  relative  to  dip11  
5  See  the  table  relative  to  experience  
 

14  

V)

Conclusion  

The  model  we  constructed  is  probably  too  simple  to  have  significant  and  interpretable  
result  on  the  impact  of  immigration.  
Nevertheless,  we  can  draw  the  tendencies  of  the  impact  of  the  variables  in  our  model  on  
wage  level.  
-­‐

The   level   of   education   has   a   positive   effect   on   wage   level.   The   highest   level   of  
education  has  the  strongest  impact  on  wage  level.  

-­‐

The  number  of  immigrants  relative  to  the  particular  activity’s  sector  of  a  native  
worsens   his   wage   level   since   we   found   a   negative   relation   between  
part_des_immi  and  logw.  

The   Human   Capital   Theory   and   the   law   of   supply   and   demand   implied   these   kinds   of  
results.  
 

 

 

15  

References  
 
Borjas,   George   J.   "The   Labor   Demand   Curve   is   Downward   Sloping:   Reexamining   the  
Impact   of   Immigration   on   the   Labor   Market,"   Quarterly   Journal   of   Economics   118(4):  
1335-­‐1374,  November  2003  
 
Carasco  Raquel,  Jimeno  Juan  F,  and  Ortega  Carolina  A.  «  The  effect  of  immigration  on  the  
labor   market   performance   of   native-­‐born   workers  :   some   evidence   for   Spain,   JEL  
classification  J21.J11,  2008.  
 
Ciaran   Devlin   and   Olivia   Bolt,   &   Dhiren   Patel,   David   Harding   and   Ishtiaq   Hussain,  
«  Impacts  of  migration  on  UK  native  employment:  An  analytical  review  of  the  evidence  »,  
Home  Office  &  Department  for  Business,  Innovation  and  Skills,  6  Mars  2014  
 
Gianmarco  I.  P.  Ottaviano  &  Giovanni  Peri,  2012.  "Rethinking  The  Effect  Of  Immigration  
On   Wages,"   Journal   of   the   European   Economic   Association,   European   Economic  
Association,  vol.  10(1),  pages  152-­‐197,  02.  
 

 

 

16  

 

Appendices   1:   Description   of   the   variables   in   French   (Variables  
table)  
 N°  

Variable  

Nature  

Size  

Libellé  

3  

AGE  

Char  

3  

Age  détaillé  au  dernier  jour  de  la  semaine  
de  référence  

5  

ANCENTR  

Num  

8  

Ancienneté  dans  l’entreprise  ou  dans  la  
fonction  publique  (en  mois)  

6  

ANNEE  

Char  

4  

Année  de  l’enquête  

7  

CSPM  

Char  

2  

Catégorie  Socioprofessionnelle  de  la  mère  

8  

CSPP  

Char  

2  

Catégorie  Socioprofessionnel  du  père  

 

Modalités  
14  à  98  –  Age  détaillé  
99-­‐99  ans  et  plus  
Sans  Objet  (ACF=’2’,  ‘3’)  ou  non  renseigné  
0  à  60  -­‐  Nombre  de  mois  
Plus  de  60  -­‐  Nombre  de  mois  entre  l’année  d’entrée  et  
l’année  de  collecte  
2012  –  Année  de  l’enquête  
00  -­‐  Inconnue  
10  -­‐  Agriculteurs  
21  -­‐  Artisans  
22  -­‐  Commerçants  et  assimilés  
23  -­‐  Chefs  d'entreprise  de  10  salariés  ou  plus  
31  -­‐  Professions  libérales  
33  -­‐  Cadres  de  la  fonction  publique  
34  -­‐  Professeurs,  professions  scientifiques  
35  -­‐  Professions  de  l'information,  des  arts  et  des  spectacles  
37  -­‐  Cadres  administratifs  et  commerciaux  d'entreprises  
38  -­‐  Ingénieurs  et  cadres  techniques  d'entreprises  
42  -­‐  Professeurs  des  écoles,  instituteurs  et  professions  
assimilées  
43  -­‐  Professions  intermédiaires  de  la  santé  et  du  travail  
social  
44  -­‐  Clergé,  religieux  
45  -­‐  Professions  intermédiaires  administratives  de  la  
fonction  publique  
46  -­‐  Professions  intermédiaires  administratives  et  
commerciales  des  entreprises  
47  -­‐  Techniciens  
48  -­‐  Contremaîtres,  agents  de  maîtrise  
52  -­‐  Employés  civils  et  agents  de  service  de  la  fonction  
publique  
53  -­‐  Policiers  et  militaires  
54  -­‐  Employés  administratifs  d'entreprise  
55  -­‐  Employés  de  commerce  
56  -­‐  Personnels  des  services  directs  aux  particuliers  
62  -­‐  Ouvriers  qualifiés  de  type  industriel  
63  -­‐  Ouvriers  qualifiés  de  type  artisanal  
64  -­‐  Chauffeurs  
65  -­‐  Ouvriers  qualifiés  de  la  manutention,  du  magasinage  et  
du  transport  
67  -­‐  Ouvriers  non  qualifiés  de  type  industriel  
68  -­‐  Ouvriers  non  qualifiés  de  type  artisanal  
69  -­‐  Ouvriers  agricoles  et  assimilés  
71  -­‐  Anciens  agriculteurs  exploitants  
72  -­‐  Anciens  artisans,  commerçants,  chefs  d'entreprise  
74  -­‐  Anciens  cadres  
75  -­‐  Anciennes  professions  intermédiaires  
77  -­‐  Anciens  employés  
78  -­‐  Anciens  ouvriers  
81  -­‐  Chômeurs  n'ayant  jamais  travaillé  
82  -­‐  Inactifs  divers  (autres  que  retraités)  
00  -­‐  Inconnue  
10  -­‐  Agriculteurs  
21  -­‐  Artisans  
22  -­‐  Commerçants  et  assimilés  
23  -­‐  Chefs  d'entreprise  de  10  salariés  ou  plus  
31  -­‐  Professions  libérales  

17  

33  -­‐  Cadres  de  la  fonction  publique  
34  -­‐  Professeurs,  professions  scientifiques  
35  -­‐  Professions  de  l'information,  des  arts  et  des  spectacles  
37  -­‐  Cadres  administratifs  et  commerciaux  d'entreprises  
38  -­‐  Ingénieurs  et  cadres  techniques  d'entreprises  
42  -­‐  Professeurs  des  écoles,  instituteurs  et  professions  
assimilées  
43  -­‐  Professions  intermédiaires  de  la  santé  et  du  travail  
social  
44  -­‐  Clergé,  religieux  
45  -­‐  Professions  intermédiaires  administratives  de  la  
fonction  publique  
46  -­‐  Professions  intermédiaires  administratives  et  
commerciales  des  entreprises  
47  -­‐  Techniciens  
48  -­‐  Contremaîtres,  agents  de  maîtrise  
52  -­‐  Employés  civils  et  agents  de  service  de  la  fonction  
publique  
53  -­‐  Policiers  et  militaires  
54  -­‐  Employés  administratifs  d'entreprise  
55  -­‐  Employés  de  commerce  
56  -­‐  Personnels  des  services  directs  aux  particuliers  
62  -­‐  Ouvriers  qualifiés  de  type  industriel  
63  -­‐  Ouvriers  qualifiés  de  type  artisanal  
64  -­‐  Chauffeurs  
65  -­‐  Ouvriers  qualifiés  de  la  manutention,  du  magasinage  et  
du  transport  
67  -­‐  Ouvriers  non  qualifiés  de  type  industriel  
68  -­‐  Ouvriers  non  qualifiés  de  type  artisanal  
69  -­‐  Ouvriers  agricoles  et  assimilés  
71  -­‐  Anciens  agriculteurs  exploitants  
72  -­‐  Anciens  artisans,  commerçants,  chefs  d'entreprise  
74  -­‐  Anciens  cadres  
75  -­‐  Anciennes  professions  intermédiaires  
77  -­‐  Anciens  employés  
78  -­‐  Anciens  ouvriers  
81  -­‐  Chômeurs  n'ayant  jamais  travaillé  
82  -­‐  Inactifs  divers  (autres  que  retraités)  
9  

DATDIP  

Char  

4  

Année  d’obtention  du  plus  haut  diplôme  

1900  à  2012  -­‐  Année  
-­‐Non  renseigné  
10  –  Licence  (L3),  Maitrise  (M1),  Master  (recherche  ou  
professionnel),  DEA,  DESS,  Doctorat  
11  –  Ecoles  niveau  licence  et  au-­‐delà  
30  –  DEUG  
31  –  BTS,  DUT  ou  équivalent  
33  –  Paramédical  et  social  (niveau  bac+2)  
41  –  Baccalauréat  général  
42  –  Bac  technologique,  bac  professionnel  ou  équivalents  
50  –  CAP,  BEP  ou  équivalents  
60  –  Brevet  des  collèges  
70  –  Certificat  d’études  primaires  
71  –  Sans  diplôme  

10  

DIP11  

Char  

2  

Diplôme  le  plus  élevé  obtenu  (11  postes)  

11  

EXTRI13  

Num  

8  

Coefficient  de  pondération  pour  les  
individus  calé  sur  les  estimations  
démographiques  de  2013  

Coefficient  numériques  sur  8  caractères  

12  

IDENT  

Char  

8  

Identifiant  anonymisé  du  logement  

Identifiant  sur  7  positions  

13  

IMMI  

Char  

1  

Etre  immigré  

14  

NAFG17N  

 

Char  

2  

Activité  de  l'établissement  actuel  (NAF  
rév2  en  17  postes)  

1  –  Oui  
2  -­‐  Non  
-­‐  Sans  objet  
AZ  -­‐  Agriculture,  sylviculture  et  pêche  
C1  -­‐  Fabrication  de  denrées  alimentaires,  de  boissons  et  de  
produits  à  base  de  tabac  
C2  -­‐  Cokéfaction  et  raffinage  
C3  -­‐  Fabrication  d'équipements  électriques,  électroniques,  
informatiques;  fabrication  de  
machines  
C4  -­‐  Fabrication  de  matériels  de  transport  
C5  -­‐  Fabrication  d'autres  produits  industriels  
DE  -­‐  Industries  extractives,  énergie,  eau,  gestion  des  déchets  

18  

et  dépollution  
FZ  -­‐  Construction  
GZ  -­‐  Commerce  ;  réparation  d'automobiles  et  de  motocycles  
HZ  -­‐  Transports  et  entreposage  
IZ  -­‐  Hébergement  et  restauration  
JZ  -­‐  Information  et  communication  
KZ  -­‐  Activités  financières  et  d'assurance  
LZ  -­‐  Activités  immobilières  
MN  -­‐  Activités  scientifiques  et  techniques  ;  services  
administratifs  et  de  soutien  
OQ  -­‐  Administration  publique,  enseignement,  santé  humaine  
et  action  sociale  
RU  -­‐  Autres  activités  de  services  
00  -­‐  Non  renseigné  

15  

NBHEUR  

Num  

8  

16  

NOI  

Char  

2  

17  

QPRC  

18  

Char  

1  

RGI  

Char  

1  

19  

SALMEE  

Num  

8  

20  

SALRED  

Num  

8  

-­‐  Sans  objet  (en  interrogation  intermédiaire)  ou  non  déclaré  
Nombre  d'heures  correspondant  au  salaire   1  à  250  -­‐  Nombre  d'heures  correspondant  au  salaire  
déclaré  
Numéro  individuel  d’identification  

Classement  de  l’emploi  principal  salarié  

Rang  d’interrogation  de  l’individu  

Salaire  mensuel  déclaré  de  l’emploi  
principal  (y  compris  primes  et  
compléments  mensuels)  
Salaire  mensuel  net  redressé  des  non  
réponses  (y  compris  les  primes  
mensualisées  et  redressées  des  non  
réponses)  

21  

SALSEE  

Num  

8  

Salaire  retiré  des  activités  secondaires  
(brut  ou  net)  

22  

SEXE  

Char  

1  

Sexe  

23  

STAT2  

Char  

2  

Statut  (Salarié,  Non  Salarié)  mis  en  
cohérence  avec  la  profession  

24  

TOTNBH  

Char  

5  

Nombre  d'heures  total  effectuées  la  
semaine  de  référence  sur  l'ensemble  des  
emplois  

25  

TRIM  

Char  

1  

Trimestre  de  l'enquête  

01  à  15  –  Numéro  d’ordre  de  la  personne  dans  le  logement  
-­‐Sans  objet  (ACTOP=’2’)  ou  non  renseigné  
1  –  Manœuvre  ou  ouvrier  spécialisé  
2  –  Ouvrier  qualifié  ou  hautement  qualifié  
3  –  technicien  
4  –  Employé  de  bureau,  de  commerce,  personnel  de  
services,  personnel  de  catégorie  C  ou  D  
5  –  Agent  de  maîtrise,  maîtrise  administrative  ou  
commerciale  VRP  (non  cadre),  personnel  de  catégorie  B  
7  –  Ingénieur,  cadre  (à  l’exception  des  directeurs  généraux  
ou  de  ses  adjoints  directs),  personnel  de  catégorie  A  
8  –  Directeur  général,  adjoint  direct  
9  -­‐  Autre  
1  -­‐  1ère  interrogation  de  l'individu  
2  -­‐  2ème  interrogation  de  l'individu  
3  -­‐  3ème  interrogation  de  l'individu  
4  -­‐  4ème  interrogation  de  l'individu  
5  -­‐  5ème  interrogation  de  l'individu  
6  -­‐  6ème  interrogation  de  l'individu  
-­‐Sans  objet  (interrogation  intermédiaire)  ou  refus  
0  à  999999  –  Montant  en  euros  
-­‐Sans  objet  (interrogation  intermédiaire)  
0  à  999999  –  Montant  en  euros  
-­‐  Refus  ou  ne  sait  pas  ou  sans  objet  (interrogation  
intermédiaire)  
0  à  999999  -­‐  Montant  en  euros  
1  –  Masculin  
2  -­‐  Féminin  
Sans  Objet  (ACT=’2’,  ‘3’)  
1  -­‐  Non  Salarié  
2  -­‐  Salarié  
-­‐  Sans  objet  
0.00  à  99.59  -­‐  Nombre  d'heures  
1  à  4  -­‐  1er  au  4ème  trimestre  de  l'année  

 
 

 

 
19  

Appendices  2:  Code  SAS:  
libname
sortie
results'; run;

'C:\Users\Lenovo\Desktop\AMSE\ECONOMETRICS

project\SAS

%macro import_dbf_file(file_to_import, sas_data_file);
proc import datafile=&file_to_import
out= sortie.&sas_data_file
dbms=dbf replace;
run;
%mend import_dbf_file;
%import_dbf_file("C:\Users\Lenovo\Desktop\AMSE\ECONOMETRICS
project\project_data\indiv122.dbf",ee122);
%import_dbf_file("C:\Users\Lenovo\Desktop\AMSE\ECONOMETRICS
project\project_data\indiv121.dbf",ee121);
%import_dbf_file("C:\Users\Lenovo\Desktop\AMSE\ECONOMETRICS
project\project_data\indiv123.dbf",ee123);
*Select useful variables;
data ee122_clean; set sortie.ee121(keep=AGE ANCENTR ANNEE CSPM CSPP DATDIP
DIP11 EXTRI13 IDENT NOI TRIM);
data ee121_clean; set sortie.ee122(keep=EXTRI13 IDENT IMMI NAFG17N NBHEUR
NOI TRIM);
data ee123_clean; set sortie.ee123(keep=EXTRI13 IDENT QPRC NOI RGI SALMEE
SEXE STAT2 TOTNBH TRIM);
proc contents data=ee121_clean; run;
proc contents data=ee122_clean; run;
proc contents data=ee123_clean; run;
*we merge
proc sort
proc sort
proc sort

the satasets i a unique file ;
data=ee121_clean; by ident noi trim; run;
data=ee122_clean; by ident noi trim; run;
data=ee123_clean; by ident noi trim; run;

data ee_all_clean; merge ee121_clean ee122_clean ee123_clean; by ident noi
trim; run;
proc contents data=ee_all_clean; run;
data ee_all_clean; set ee_all_clean;
*We convert some variables from (caractère) to (numérique);
annee_num= input(annee,4.);
age_num = input(age,2.);
datdip_num = input(datdip,4.);
totnbh_num = input(totnbh,2.);
trim_num = input(trim,1.);
*create variable for native wage;
if immi=1 then salmee=.;
hourly_wage=salmee/nbheur;
logw=log(hourly_wage);
*Definition of experience since school leaving and seniority + instrumental
variable exper**2;
exper=annee_num-datdip_num; if dip11='71' then exper=age_num-16;
exper2 = exper**2;
seniority=int(ancentr/12);

 

20  

*The difference between experience and seniority should be positive;
dif_exp_sen=exper-seniority;
*Creation of dummy for observation relative to an individual;
lag1_ok=(ident=lag(ident)&
naia=lag(naia)
&
sexe=lag(sexe)
trim=lag(trim)+1);

&

* Creation of dummies corresponding to the level of education;
Dip_70=(dip11=70);
Dip_71=(dip11=71);
Dip_50=(dip11=50);
Dip_60=(dip11=60);
Dip_41=(dip11=41);
Dip_42=(dip11=42);
Dip_30=(dip11=30);
Dip_31=(dip11=31);
Dip_33=(dip11=33);
Dip_10=(dip11=10);
Dip_11=(dip11=11);
*Creation of instruments;
cspm_00=(cspm=00);
cspm_01=(cspm=10);
cspm_02=(cspm=21 & 22 & 23);
cspm_03=(cspm=31 & 33 & 34 &
cspm_04=(cspm=42 & 43 & 44 &
cspm_05=(cspm=52 & 53 & 54 &
cspm_06=(cspm=62 & 63 & 64 &
cspp_00=(cspp=00);
cspp_01=(cspp=10);
cspp_02=(cspp=21 &
cspp_03=(cspp=31 &
cspp_04=(cspp=42 &
cspp_05=(cspp=52 &
cspp_06=(cspp=62 &
run;

22
33
43
53
63

&
&
&
&
&

23);
34 &
44 &
54 &
64 &

35
45
55
65

&
&
&
&

37 & 38);
46 & 47 & 48);
56);
67 & 68 & 69);

35
45
55
65

&
&
&
&

37 & 38);
46 & 47 & 48);
56);
67 & 68 & 69);

proc means data=ee_all_clean(where=(dip11='71'));
var exper datdip_num;
run;
data ee_all_clean;set ee_all_clean;
imm=(immi=1);
run;
*Create the Immigration per Sector, and profession variable;
PROC SORT DATA = ee_all_clean; by NAFG17N QPRC;
RUN;
PROC MEANS NOPRINT DATA = ee_all_clean; by NAFG17N QPRC;
VAR IMM;
OUTPUT OUT = PART_IMMI MEAN=part_des_immi;
RUN;
proc print data=part_immi;
run;
*Insert the new table containing
profession in the main table;

 

the

immigration

per

sector

&

per

21  

DATA ee_all_clean; merge ee_all_clean PART_IMMI; by NAFG17N QPRC;
RUN;
*We keep only observations relative to employees;
data ee_all_clean; set ee_all_clean(where=(stat2='2')); run;
*Inspection of qualitative variables;
proc freq data = ee_all_clean;
tables cspp cspm dip11 immi nafg17n qprc sexe salmet stat2;
run;
*Inspection of quantitative variables;
proc means data= ee_all_clean;
var exper logw hourly_wage nbheur part_des_immi
seniority;
run;

salmee

salred

salsee

proc means data=ee_all_clean;
class rgi;
var salmee;
run;
proc means data=ee_all_clean(where=(salmee ne .));
var salmee salred salsee seniority datdip_num nbheur totnbh_num cspm cspp;
run;
*Identification of inconsistent observations (experience and seniority);
data ee_all_clean; set ee_all_clean;
outlier1_exp_age=(exper-(age_num-12)>0);
outlier1_exp_sen=(exper-seniority<0);
run;
proc contents data=ee_all_clean;
run;
*Clear the table from the missing values;
data ee_all_clean_nomissing; set ee_all_clean;
if hourly_wage ne . & seniority ne . & exper ne .;
run;
*Check;
proc univariate data=ee_all_clean_nomissing;
var dif_exp_sen seniority exper;
run;
*Check of main variables;
proc univariate data=ee_all_clean_nomissing;
var logw hourly_wage exper seniority nbheur part_des_immi salmee dip11;
run;
*Check if there is inconsistent value relative to wage;
proc means mean min max data= ee_all_clean_nomissing;
class dip11;
var salmee hourly_wage;
run;
*Check the importance of outliers relative to experience;
proc freq data=ee_all_clean_nomissing;
tables outlier1_exp_age outlier1_exp_sen;
run;

 

22  

*Defining outliers;
data ee_all_clean_nomissing; set ee_all_clean_nomissing;
outlier2_exp_sen=(exper-seniority<-1);
outlier_salmee=(salmee<=0);
outlier_nbheur=(nbheur<20 or nbheur>200);
outlier_hourly_wage= (hourly_wage < 5.0 or hourly_wage >100.0);
run;
*Check importance of outliers that we just create;
proc means data=ee_all_clean_nomissing;
var outlier_nbheur outlier_hourly_wage;
run;
*Clear the tables by suppressing all outliers;
data ee_all_clean2; set ee_all_clean_nomissing; run;
data ee_all_clean2; set ee_all_clean2; if outlier_hourly_wage = 0; run;
data ee_all_clean2; set ee_all_clean2; if outlier1_exp_age = 0; run;
data ee_all_clean2; set ee_all_clean2; if outlier2_exp_sen = 0; run;
data ee_all_clean2; set ee_all_clean2; if outlier_nbheur = 0; run;
*Check of main variables;
proc univariate data= ee_all_clean2(where=(hourly_wage ne . & seniority ne
. & exper ne . ));
var salmee hourly_wage exper dip11 part_des_immi;
run;
*we keep the first observation for each person;
data ee_all_clean_cross_section; set ee_all_clean2; by NAFG17N QPRC;
run;
*Check for instruments;
proc freq data= ee_all_clean_cross_section;
tables cspp_00 cspp_01 cspp_02 cspp_03 cspp_04 cspp_05
cspm_01 cspm_02 cspm_03 cspm_04 cspm_05 cspm_06 exper**2;
run;

cspp_06

cspm_00

*OLS estimation;
PROC REG data=ee_all_clean_cross_section
plots(maxpoints=30000) = residualhistogram;
MODEL logw = exper dip_71 dip_70 dip_60 dip_50 dip_42 dip_41 dip_33 dip_31
dip_30 dip_11 dip_10 part_des_immi /noint;
RUN;
*Instrumental
variables
estimation
+
Haussman
and
White
Test
(heteroskedasticity);
proc model data=ee_all_clean_cross_section;
logw= b1*exper + b2*dip_71 + b3*dip_70 + b4*dip_60 + b5*dip_50 + b6*dip_42
+ b7*dip_41 + b8*dip_33 + b9*dip_31 + b10*dip_30 + b11*dip_11 + b12*dip_10
+ b13*part_des_immi;
endogenous logw exper dip_71 dip_70 dip_60 dip_50 dip_42 dip_41 dip_33
dip_31 dip_30 dip_11 dip_10;
exogenous part_des_immi;
instruments _exog_ exper2 cspp_00 cspp_01 cspp_02 cspp_03 cspp_04 cspp_05
cspp_06
cspm_00
cspm_01
cspm_02
cspm_03
cspm_04
cspm_05
cspm_06
part_des_immi;
fit logw/ OLS 2SLS white KERNEL=(parzen,0,) HAUSMAN;
run;
*GMM estimation + White Test (heteroskedasticity);
proc model data=ee_all_clean_cross_section;

 

23  

logw= b1*exper + b2*dip_71 + b3*dip_70 + b4*dip_60 + b5*dip_50 + b6*dip_42
+ b7*dip_41 + b8*dip_33 + b9*dip_31 + b10*dip_30 + b11*dip_11 + b12*dip_10
+ b13*part_des_immi;
endogenous logw exper dip_71 dip_70 dip_60 dip_50 dip_42 dip_41 dip_33
dip_31 dip_30 dip_11 dip_10;
exogenous part_des_immi;
instruments _exog_ exper2 cspp_00 cspp_01 cspp_02 cspp_03 cspp_04 cspp_05
cspp_06
cspm_00
cspm_01
cspm_02
cspm_03
cspm_04
cspm_05
cspm_06
part_des_immi;
fit logw/ GMM white KERNEL=(parzen,0,);
run;  

 

 

 

24  

Appendices  3  Tables:  
Tables  Dip  11:  
DIP11
DIP11 Fréquence Pourcentage Fréquence Pctage.
cumulée cumulé
10

3394

10.76

3394

10.76

11

807

2.56

4201

13.32

30

312

0.99

4513

14.31

31

3685

11.68

8198

25.99

33

1020

3.23

9218

29.23

41

2153

6.83

11371

36.05

42

4115

13.05

15486

49.10

50

9211

29.20

24697

78.30

60

2399

7.61

27096

85.91

70

876

2.78

27972

88.69

71

3568

11.31

31540

100.00

 

Tables  Experience:  
N  

Moyenne  

Ecart-­‐type  

Minimum  

Maximum  

31540  

22.0846861  

12.3736197  

0  

67.0000000  

 
 

 

 

25  

Tables  Part_des_immi  
Obs. NAFG17N QPRC _TYPE_ _FREQ_ part_des_immi
1

217047

0.10030

2

1

0

2

0.50000

3

7

0

2

0.00000

4

9

0

4

0.00000

0

75

0.17333

5 00
6 00

1

0

59

0.25424

7 00

2

0

80

0.32500

8 00

3

0

67

0.07463

9 00

4

0

274

0.18248

10 00

5

0

56

0.00000

11 00

7

0

102

0.06863

12 00

8

0

16

0.00000

13 00

9

0

42

0.04762

0

4439

0.02005

14 AZ
15 AZ

1

0

749

0.13218

16 AZ

2

0

739

0.07578

17 AZ

3

0

112

0.00000

18 AZ

4

0

242

0.02066

19 AZ

5

0

54

0.00000

20 AZ

7

0

114

0.07018

21 AZ

8

0

16

0.00000

22 AZ

9

0

39

0.00000

0

491

0.02444

23 C1

 

0

24 C1

1

0

1009

0.07136

25 C1

2

0

1428

0.05392

26 C1

3

0

247

0.05668

27 C1

4

0

853

0.08441

28 C1

5

0

437

0.01144

29 C1

7

0

399

0.04010

26  

Obs. NAFG17N QPRC _TYPE_ _FREQ_ part_des_immi
30 C1

8

0

40

0.10000

31 C1

9

0

69

0.00000

32 C2

2

0

9

0.00000

33 C2

3

0

8

0.00000

34 C2

4

0

14

0.14286

35 C2

5

0

21

0.00000

36 C2

7

0

32

0.03125

37 C2

8

0

8

0.25000

0

56

0.12500

38 C3
39 C3

1

0

340

0.08529

40 C3

2

0

998

0.06513

41 C3

3

0

634

0.06309

42 C3

4

0

343

0.05539

43 C3

5

0

305

0.03279

44 C3

7

0

1035

0.08599

45 C3

8

0

46

0.04348

46 C3

9

0

28

0.03571

0

24

0.00000

47 C4
48 C4

1

0

312

0.13141

49 C4

2

0

1025

0.07805

50 C4

3

0

564

0.05496

51 C4

4

0

174

0.06897

52 C4

5

0

212

0.04245

53 C4

7

0

918

0.06427

54 C4

8

0

3

0.00000

55 C4

9

0

24

0.04167

0

881

0.06697

56 C5

 

57 C5

1

0

1918

0.10584

58 C5

2

0

4430

0.06591

59 C5

3

0

1750

0.06171

27  

Obs. NAFG17N QPRC _TYPE_ _FREQ_ part_des_immi
60 C5

4

0

1427

0.07708

61 C5

5

0

1318

0.04932

62 C5

7

0

1912

0.04498

63 C5

8

0

80

0.10000

64 C5

9

0

76

0.10526

0

53

0.09434

65 DE
66 DE

1

0

262

0.16031

67 DE

2

0

525

0.08762

68 DE

3

0

558

0.04659

69 DE

4

0

455

0.06154

70 DE

5

0

602

0.03987

71 DE

7

0

656

0.03963

72 DE

8

0

29

0.13793

73 DE

9

0

61

0.03279

0

3232

0.15347

74 FZ
75 FZ

1

0

1704

0.23826

76 FZ

2

0

5190

0.19904

77 FZ

3

0

819

0.09524

78 FZ

4

0

1061

0.09614

79 FZ

5

0

750

0.08667

80 FZ

7

0

1022

0.05577

81 FZ

8

0

56

0.01786

82 FZ

9

0

150

0.05333

0

3690

0.10867

83 GZ

 

84 GZ

1

0

1352

0.08580

85 GZ

2

0

2904

0.08919

86 GZ

3

0

1160

0.06207

87 GZ

4

0

10578

0.07818

88 GZ

5

0

2050

0.07561

89 GZ

7

0

2986

0.05794

28  

Obs. NAFG17N QPRC _TYPE_ _FREQ_ part_des_immi
90 GZ

8

0

239

0.05021

91 GZ

9

0

214

0.09813

0

584

0.23973

92 HZ
93 HZ

1

0

703

0.13087

94 HZ

2

0

2450

0.06776

95 HZ

3

0

557

0.04129

96 HZ

4

0

3266

0.07379

97 HZ

5

0

1227

0.04238

98 HZ

7

0

1236

0.05016

99 HZ

8

0

28

0.00000

100 HZ

9

0

348

0.02586

0

1522

0.15900

101 IZ
102 IZ

1

0

326

0.21472

103 IZ

2

0

753

0.17928

104 IZ

3

0

90

0.18889

105 IZ

4

0

3819

0.18591

106 IZ

5

0

387

0.08269

107 IZ

7

0

289

0.16263

108 IZ

8

0

55

0.12727

109 IZ

9

0

131

0.20611

0

576

0.12847

110 JZ
111 JZ

1

0

33

0.09091

112 JZ

2

0

71

0.00000

113 JZ

3

0

695

0.05899

114 JZ

4

0

864

0.06597

115 JZ

5

0

387

0.03618

116 JZ

7

0

2781

0.09924

117 JZ

8

0

49

0.14286

118 JZ

9

0

103

0.05825

0

295

0.05424

119 KZ

 

29  

Obs. NAFG17N QPRC _TYPE_ _FREQ_ part_des_immi
120 KZ

1

0

32

0.00000

121 KZ

2

0

53

0.09434

122 KZ

3

0

434

0.00000

123 KZ

4

0

2361

0.03558

124 KZ

5

0

665

0.03308

125 KZ

7

0

2489

0.07151

126 KZ

8

0

125

0.09600

127 KZ

9

0

45

0.04444

0

429

0.08392

128 LZ
129 LZ

1

0

86

0.30233

130 LZ

2

0

98

0.33673

131 LZ

3

0

50

0.16000

132 LZ

4

0

1049

0.14871

133 LZ

5

0

211

0.04265

134 LZ

7

0

343

0.04956

135 LZ

8

0

28

0.00000

136 LZ

9

0

33

0.09091

0

2965

0.07825

137 MN
138 MN

1

0

2636

0.19613

139 MN

2

0

2391

0.19866

140 MN

3

0

1445

0.07336

141 MN

4

0

5992

0.14786

142 MN

5

0

1258

0.09618

143 MN

7

0

4217

0.08442

144 MN

8

0

193

0.06218

145 MN

9

0

392

0.11735

0

3253

0.06025

146 OQ

 

147 OQ

1

0

1836

0.10349

148 OQ

2

0

1829

0.09021

149 OQ

3

0

2143

0.05320

30  

Obs. NAFG17N QPRC _TYPE_ _FREQ_ part_des_immi
150 OQ

4

0

25811

0.06586

151 OQ

5

0

8871

0.02390

152 OQ

7

0

13875

0.04029

153 OQ

8

0

152

0.01974

154 OQ

9

0

4857

0.07227

0

2018

0.09861

155 RU
156 RU

1

0

774

0.19638

157 RU

2

0

824

0.12985

158 RU

3

0

484

0.07645

159 RU

4

0

6746

0.18040

160 RU

5

0

497

0.08249

161 RU

7

0

1026

0.11988

162 RU

8

0

88

0.10227

163 RU

9

0

818

0.16137

 

 

31