The Little Book Survival PASIMD.pdf


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I. NOTES FOR FRIENDS AND RELATIVES

A) UNLOADING, ACCOMPANYING, ARRANGING
B) PANIC ATTACKS
C) TRANSFORMING TOGETHER
D) TAKING CARE OF YOURSELF

A) UNLOADING, ACCOMPANYING, ARRANGING

FEAR
- It is important not to minimize the fear of the suffering person (nor your own!). For example,
avoid phrases such as: "It's okay", "It will pass", "You're strong". Instead, ask questions about the
nature of the fear, welcome, and listen without judgment. You can put forward the fact that you
understand, that you are afraid too, and offer to transform this together. The person needs to
"unload" their fear, at least a part of it, otherwise they will remain stuck in an obsessive circle
(ruminations). The ruminations get worse when the suffering person is left alone with their
thoughts, or when the discussion around these same thoughts drags on and on.

STIMMING
- Some PASs sometimes use self-stimulating or calming gestures (which we call stimming). These
are gestures that any human can do (touching hair, scratching, tapping), to a much more systematic,
longer, and less innocuous degree. Some PASs swing back and forth, scratch, clap their hands, need
to touch surfaces, and so on. These seemingly mechanical gestures are necessary to regain contact
with the tangible (which also means "reconnecting to a sensoriality that begins with oneself...") and
to relieve strong tension. Don't ask the person to stop stimming, these gestures are highly necessary:
think of them as self-accompaniment. Understand that the sensory treatment of PAS is not the same
as that of neurotypicals.

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