Res populi English n°1 .pdf



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Middle Age

Res Populi
Study of former civilian clothing

N°1

B.A. 1415
Productions

Anaïs Guyon — Guillaume Levillain

Sommaire
Preface…………………………………………………………………………..3
Introduction…………………………………………………………………….4
Undergarments……………..…………………………………………………..6
Doublet and hoses…..…………………………………………………………..8
Dress...…………………………………………………………………………10
Hood and headgear………………………………………………………...…12
Shoes and purses……………...………………………………………………14
Conclusion……………………………………………………………………..17
Bibliography…………………………………………………………………..17

Crédits:

Rédaction :

« Res Populi » est édité par :

Guillaume Levillain

B.A. 1415

Illustrations :

80 rue des écoles

Guillaume Levillain

60150 Longueil Annel

Textes :

burgundia.1415@gmail.com

Anaïs Guyon
Guillaume Levillain
2

Preface
Dear friends reenactors and lovers of history , it is with great pleasure that we
share with you this new pdf, "Res populi ."
Designed as a free supplement to the journal " Historia Viva ", " Res populi "
will address civilian clothing through iconography, from antiquity to the nineteenth century.
The approach is simple : a document , accompanied by short texts and illustrations, will be decrypted As a reconstruction assumption.
Bosses and labor councils will enhance our words.
This work is the result of our experience and our research, and is in no case a
truth first . We wanted it to serve as a basis for reflection and research for beginners as for more experienced of you .
The whole team wishes you a pleasant reading.

Anaïs Guyon

Guillaume Levillain

3

Introduction
It is not always easy to get an accurate idea of medieval costume at first. Sometimes it takes a long and tedious search and comparison of sources
(archaeological, pictures, text, etc.) to arrive at an acceptable result.
But the more time passes, the more the pictorial techniques improve, giving us
access to representations of increasingly accurate. The hinge is made in the early
fifteenth century period of profound change and political, artistic and cultural.

The miniature that we have chosen for this first work is taken from a manuscript
in the Bibliothèque nationale de France in Paris, and we judged able to serve our
words. It shows among other things a man who seems to be readily status, without having a noble setting.
It also has the significant advantage of not include the latest fashion, and therefore suitable for a reconstruction of a character for the 1380-1420 period (time
of King Charles VI of France).

BNF Fr. 9141, Folio 175
4

Obviously, at the sight of this document , certain points remain unclear . What
about the neck of the dress, or shoes or purse ?

These are the points that we will deal with you. The whole outfit, underwear to
accessories will be reviewed . But this pdf wanting to be more didactic than
pompously university , we do not intentionally go into detail so as not to lose
the reader . To you, thereafter, to supplement your knowledge , with what you
have learned .
For it is indeed a discourse on method and not a
magisterial court. Again, the findings of this work
are those us.
Similarly , bosses are indicative to give you an
idea of shapes and cuts. When you use it , be sure
to perform to your exact measurements . The garment in the early fifteenth century following its
own logic : it is at the service of the body and
supports it. What is the exact opposite of what is
done today, where we only serve as coat rack for
clothes

5

Undergarments
Apart from the form ( and matter !) , Our
model wears the same underwear today.
« Braies » fall in the middle of the
thigh , or take the form of a modern
boxer in their shorter version .
Carved in linen , they are composed of
two rectangular pieces ( closer to the
thighs) , joined together with two square
rooms . It is they who give full comfort
to this garment, and avoid tears at the
slightest deviation leg .
A belt containing a drawstring called
brehel allows tightening the fairly low
on the hips .

The shirt is also carved into the canvas, and
falls to mid-thigh. The pattern that we chose
here requires a little work .
It consists of two large rectangles (allow a
shoulder width + 5cm to determine its
width) ; neckline at the back of the room is
only slightly indented when it is frankly on
the front. This opening should be large
enough to pass the head.
Two ease of triangles together these two parts
on the sides, from the bottom of the armhole .
The arms are made of a rounded rectangle on
top, closed on itself by means of a seam under
the arm. Under the armpit , a small square of
fabric reduces tensions.

6

7

Doublet and hoses
It is carved in a wool twill woven fabric ,
softer than a canvas weaving, and thus
better able to absorb the tensions caused
by the attachment system to the doublet .
To gain even more flexibility , will be cut
on the bias of the fabric.

The doublet is four quarters, assembled at
the sides and back. It closes with a series
of padded cotton wool buttons sewn on
the edge of the garment. The sleeves fit
closely the shoulder , allowing the release
and not to hinder his movements.

These hoses are fixed inside the doublet
by estaches sewn on upside down against
the manner of it kept in museums of Lyon
Fabrics and attributed to Charles de Blois.
This system has the advantage to persist
since the last quarter of the fourteenth
century to the beginning of the following
century , when the fixation with external
knots becoming widespread.

It consists of an outer cut in the wool, a
place and against four fabric layers , and
finally a against which serves to liner.
Everything is assembled together: there is
no floating liner as today. Amidst all this ,
there is a coated cotton linter , maintained by pitting.
On his legs, our man dons tails in hoses.

8

9

Dress
Our man wearing a dress : this is how we
qualify all outerwear for both women and
men . Each has its specificities ( German
dress , dress « à cueillir », etc.), and in
our case it is a very simple kind , which
falls in the middle of the calves .

We have four main quarters , each divided
into two parts.

The sleeves are widely flared at the wrists ,
and can roll up on the forearm and reveal
the doublet . The collar is buttoned meanwhile by a series of buttons.

Carved in wool and lined canvas , its
construction can range from complicated
( four rectangles trimmed triangle to give
comfort necessary) to the simpler ( four
quarters ) . We chose an intermediate assembly, based on a play found on the
website of Herfjolnes , and dated from
the late Middle Ages.

Let's use as a reminder that they are never
sewn flat but on the edge of the garment.
Note that the triangle accompanying the
handle our boss is not mandatory, but can
help you make up your business in in case
of bad paterne ( too short sleeve).

10

11

Hood and headgear
We have the simplest model of headgear for this period : a simple hat
consists of a background, and a
headband. These two pieces are cut
from wool . We decided not to
double the headband for comfort .
But you can also double bottom,
double as nothing at all!
To cover the shoulders , our man
wearing a hood , also in wool. By
observing more detail the miniature,
we find that the lining is blue.

Several interpretations are available to us . Let
us assume that the miniature is misleading ,
but in this case all the work falls into the water , and the lining is made of white cloth . Either we remember that the complexion linen
lining may be an appropriate long as it is not
too exposed to direct light. But the color will
still be in the neck . Lastly, we can double the
chaperone with a woolen cloth also blue,
thinner , made from a twill . It is this last solution we recommend . Do not fear the heat ,
wool is insulation .

12

13

Shoes sand purse
The miniature leaving some doubt , we
looked for a simple model of shoes to
achieve.

Obviously , there is nothing absolute or
fixed, but this detail is more significant to
know.

This shoe is low and indented under the
malleolus . The opening is provided with a
gusset , but you can if you want to do without . A feedback system was preferred to
lacing. It is this detail that you can play if
you want your character to be more
oriented fourteenth or fifteenth century.
Indeed , excavations in London allows us
to identify two main trends in the closure
shoes : the lacing is preferred in the
fourteenth , fifteenth and looping .

The purse is based on a model exhibited at
the museum of Dodrecht , the Netherlands . It is composed of a main body
folded on itself, and several pockets.
You can refer to the pdf "Soldiers of former No. 1" and " A Guide male costume in
the early fifteenth " construction systems
for shoes and purse .

14

15

16

Conclusion
We saw how to use a thumbnail and draw the data required to carry a full set . But it is evident that this work must be accompanied by many readings as well as a study of other documents. The more you have realistic comparables , the more you can unravel the symbolism
of reality in medieval iconography and reach a satisfactory result.

The colors and some details may also be modified to suit your tastes and what you have
seen elsewhere, there is no uniform clothing in the fifteenth century but lots and lots of possible combinations , both shoes level that the assembly of the dress or pitting of doublet .
Dare to be different and the color!

In an upcoming issue of "Res Populi " , we will address the measurement and the different
stages of editing and finishing of clothing.

Bibliography
Anaïs Guyon, Guillaume Levillain, Guide du costume masculin au début du XVe siècle,
B.A. 1415 Productions, 2013
Anaïs Guyon, Guillaume Levillain, Soldats d‘autrefois n°1: Azincourt, B.A. 1415 Productions, 2014
Olaf Goubitz, Purses in pieces, Oxbow books, 2009
Adrien Harmand, Jeanne d’Arc, ses costumes, ses armures, essai de reconstitution, 1929
17

18

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19

N°1
Edito

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Summary

"Song of Departure " ( French Revolution)

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Mon p’tit 75: the web serie ( 14/18)

Interview

The companies

Steeve Mauclert-- Ars Fabra

Maisnie Ty Varlenn (XIV century)

Historical places

Company of the Amber Moon

The tower Philip the Fair of Villeneuve- lès- Avignons

Guillaume Levillain

Letavia (fifth - sixth century )
Records

Pont-Croix , Brittany
Guillaume Levillain

The linothorax : Reconstruction ( fifth century )
Julien Hormain
The Scandinavian funeral carriage ( ninth century )

Reports
Loupian 2014 ( ancient )
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Benoît Eeckman
Western fifteenth reenactment in Russia

The Eparges 2015 ( 14/18)

Maxime Baschirotto

Elizaveta Rylova
The studios Sequana Media

Brancion 2014 ( fifteenth century )
Guillaume Levillain

Guillaume Levillain
Agincourt : Dress gross bascinet

Historic Fort Wayne (eighteenth century)

Guillaume Levillain
Military embroidery (Ist French Empire)
Frédéric Coune

Kathleen O'Connell
Receipts
The cakes of joy (twelfth century) Anaïs Guyon
20

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