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Men of War AS Japan army EN .pdf



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Contents
The war in the Pacific. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
How to use this guide. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Infantry squads. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Recruits....................................................................................................................7
Assault infantry........................................................................................................7
Regular infantry........................................................................................................7
Paratroopers.............................................................................................................8
Sappers.....................................................................................................................8
SNLF platoon..............................................................................................................8
Mechanized SNLF battalion.......................................................................................9
Engineers (AP)..........................................................................................................9
Engineers (AT)...........................................................................................................9
Kamikazes............................................................................................................... 10
Machine gunners of the Empire............................................................................. 11
Marine paratroopers.............................................................................................. 11

Specialized soldiers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Rifleman.................................................................................................................. 12
Submachine gun..................................................................................................... 12
Machine gunner...................................................................................................... 12
Team with anti-tank rifle........................................................................................ 13
Anti-tank team........................................................................................................ 13
Crew........................................................................................................................ 14
Flamethrower team................................................................................................ 14
Sniper..................................................................................................................... 14
Officer..................................................................................................................... 15
Radio operator........................................................................................................ 15

Fixed weapons and artillery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Heavy machine gun Machine gun.............................................................................. 16
Type 2 20 mm AA AA defense..................................................................................... 16
Type 94 mortar Mortar.............................................................................................. 16
Type 1 47 mm AT AT gun .......................................................................................... 17
Type 2 57 mm AT AT gun . ........................................................................................ 17
Type 90 75 mm AT AT gun ....................................................................................... 17
Type 4 75 mm AA AA defense / AT gun . ...................................................................... 18
Type 91 105 mm howitzer Field howitzer.................................................................... 18
Type 96 150 mm howitzer Field howitzer.................................................................... 18
200 mm rocket Rocket mortar.................................................................................... 19

© 2011 1C Company. Developed by Digitalmindsoft. .
All rights reserved.

Light vehicles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Type 92 Scout vehicle................................................................................................. 20
Ha-Go Light tank........................................................................................................ 21
Ke-Nu Light tank........................................................................................................ 22
Chi-Ha 57 Light tank................................................................................................... 23
Chi-Ha 47 Light tank................................................................................................... 24
Isuzu AA AA vehicle . ................................................................................................. 25
SS-D Minesweeper...................................................................................................... 25

Tank destroyer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Ho-Ni 1 Light tank destroyer.......................................................................................... 26
Ho-Ri 2 Heavy tank destroyer........................................................................................ 27
Ho-Ri 1 Heavy tank destroyer........................................................................................ 28

Self-propelled artillery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Ho-Ni 2 Self-propelled howitzer..................................................................................... 29
Ho-Ro Self-propelled howitzer....................................................................................... 30
Ha-To Self-propelled howitzer....................................................................................... 31
Isuzu mortar Self-propelled mortar.............................................................................. 31

Tanks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Chi-He Medium tank................................................................................................... 32
Ho-I Medium tank....................................................................................................... 33
Chi-Nu Medium tank................................................................................................... 34
Chi-To Medium tank................................................................................................... 35
Chi-Ri Heavy tank....................................................................................................... 36
Chi-Ha 120 Light tank................................................................................................. 38

Transport and logistics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Type 97 Motorcycle.................................................................................................... 39
Ho-Ha Armored half track............................................................................................. 39
Isuzu (transport) Supply truck................................................................................... 40
Isuzu (supplies) Supply truck.................................................................................... 40
Isuzu (engineers) Supply truck.................................................................................. 40

Special attacks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
¡Banzai!................................................................................................................... 41

Japanese campaign battles
Battle of Khalkhin Gol. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May 11, 1939.
Before the beginning of the Second World War, the
Soviet Union and Japan maintained a border war
that reached its peak when the Mongolian Army

Chronology

occupied part of Japanese territory in Manchukuo.

May 11, 1939
Battle of Khalkhin Gol

The battle took the name of the river Khalkhin Gol,
which crossed through the scene of the battle.

The war in the Pacific
In 1937, Japan invaded China. In September 1940, Japan signed the Tripartite Pact with
Germany and Italy. In response to their expansionist aspirations in Asia, the western
powers ordered the blockade of oil to the Japanese Empire.

Battle of Singapore. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . February 7, 1942.
Japan attacked the fortification of Singapore, the
most important British military base in Southeast
Asia. The objective was to take control of a funda-

On December 7, 1941, the Japanese Air Force launched an attack on the American base

mental strategic point in order to guarantee supply

of Pearl Harbor in the Hawaiian Islands. Three days later, Japanese troops landed on the

routes and control communications with Malaysia.

island of Luzon and began the conquest of the Philippines.

Siam, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Java, Borneo, Burma, New Guinea and the Solomon Islands.
But in the spring of 1942, the powerful Japanese fleet was destroyed by the United

Battle of Iwo Jima. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . February 19, 1945.

States Navy in the Coral Sea and in the Battle of Midway, which put a stop to its advance

One of the decisive battles of the Second World

towards Australia. Japan began to show signs of weakness and economic inferiority in its

War. The allied landing on the island of Iwo Jima,

campaign against the United States.

converted into a fortress by the Japanese Army,

Japanese Army fought fiercely against the most powerful fleet ever seen in the Pacific. Not
even the first time use of kamikaze pilots could prevent their defeat.
On February 19, 1945, the Battle of Iwo Jima began, the most bloody of all the Pacific
battles. 20,000 Japanese soldiers died at the hands of the United States Army. On April
1, in Okinawa, the kamikazes punished the enemy fleet, but Japan lost the Yamato, their
prize battleship.
On August 6, the first atomic bomb devastated Hiroshima. Two days later the Soviet Union
declared war on Japan and invaded Manchukuo and Korea. On August 9, the second
atom bomb fell on Nagasaki. Not long after, the Emperor announced the unconditional
surrender of Japan.

February 7, 1942
Battle of Singapore
June 4, 1942
Battle of Midway
June 7, 1942
Battle of Guadalcanal
October 20, 1944
Battle of Leyte
(Philippines)
February 19, 1945
Battle of Iwo Jima

In just a few months, the Imperial army destroyed the British Pacific fleet and occupied

On October 20, 1944, the Battle of Leyte in the Philippines began. For several days, the

December 7, 1941
Attack on Pearl Harbor

took 36 days of hard fighting for control of one of
the key strategic enclaves in the Pacific.

March 3, 1945
Fall of Manila
April 1, 1945
Battle of Okinawa
August 6, 1945
Atomic bomb on Hiroshima
August 9, 1945
Atomic bomb on Nagasaki
August 15, 1945
Capitulation of Japan

6

Japanese Imperial Army: How to use this guide

How to use this guide
M Command Points (Special)
C Control Points

Assault infantry
M 135 C 25

Quantity
6
Combat guide
Inventory:

Unit's .
equipment

Name of the unit
Icon

R Reload time
A Maximum range

66



10

63

54

30

70

110 m
A 4x
44

110 m

V 35

M Command Points (Special)
C Control Points

1 29 2
3
M5A125
Stuart
Light tank25
300
13
M 32 C
4 38 5
6 25
Main:

L 37 mm R 3
G 2x 0.30 caliber

4 SD Crew
Passengers
S

Y Can tow /
be towed

V 35

D4 S-

A 110 m

4



Type 99 rifle

Type 100 submachine gun

Inventory:

16x

6x

10

30

70

4x

8x

4x

110 m

Regular infantry
M 150 C 25.5 H 10 X 2

1 29 2 25 3 25
Inventory: 38 5 32 6 25
4

armored enemy scout vehicles such as the German SdKfz 223 and Panzer I or the Japanese Type 92s.

1 4

Front

2

Side
Rear

79x2x 0.30 caliber68x
G

5x

3.400x

1x

The British used the surname of the Confederate States Army general, Jeb Stuart, to name the whole series of United States M3 and M5

6

3

1

tanks. The M5A1 could carry the same 37 mm weapon as the Greyhound; although its speed was slower, it was better armored and had

Type 99 rifle

nearly double the emergency ammunition supply. It was efficient for providing close support to the infantry as well as confronting lightlyarmored enemy scout vehicles such as the German SdKfz 223 and Panzer I or the Japanese Type 92s.

Type 100 submachine gun

Inventory:

Inventory:

79x

Unit's .
equipment

6

tanks. The M5A1 could carry the same 37 mm weapon as the Greyhound; although its speed was slower, it was better armored and had
Armor:
nearly double the emergency ammunition supply. It was efficient for providing close support to the infantry as well as confronting lightly-

Turret

Machine guns
mounted

H 10 X 2

AP:
66
63
54
44
The British used the surname of the Confederate States Army general, Jeb Stuart, to name the whole series of United States M3 and M5

Armor (in mm of steel)

3 6

AP:

Type

6x L 37 mm 8xR 3

Assault infantry
M 125 C 25

V Speed

M1 Garand semi-automatic rifle

Armor:

Penetration into armor
according to distance .
(in mm of steel)

5

10x

M5A1 Stuart Light tank
M 300 C 13

Inventory:

MP 28 submachine gun

Inventory:

4

Thompson submachine gun

Main:
16x

1

M1 Garand semi-automatic rifle

H 8 X 1

2
Type 99 rifle

Assault infantry
8x C 25 4xH 10 X 2
M 135

6x

6

L Caliber of weapon

6

H 10 X 2

4

Thompson submachine gun

16x

Recruits
M 60 C 16

1

Weapon icon

Hull

H Number of men who make up the unit
X Weapons handling skills

Combat guide

Name of weapon

7

Infantry squads

Name of the unit
Icon

Combat guide

68x

5x

3.400x

1x

12x

3x

6x

2x

10x

Type 99 machine gun

8

Japanese Imperial Army: Infantry squads
Paratroopers
M 225 C 30

8

H 10 X 3

6
Type 99 machine gun

20x

16x

2x

2
Type 2 submachine gun

Inventory:

25x

9
Mechanized SNLF battalion
M 445 C 35 H 10 X 4

2
Type 99 rifle

Combat guide

5x

40x

2

MP 28 submachine gun

2
Type 99 machine gun

Sappers
M 50 C 6

Type 4 rocket launcher

Inventory:

20x

H 2 X 2

2

14x

10x
Engineers (AP)
M 150 C 12

Type 100 submachine gun
Inventory:

12x

H 4 X 2

4

2x

Type 100 submachine gun

SNLF platoon
M 355 C 35

6

Inventory:

60x

H 10 X 4

2
Type 2 submachine gun

2

Engineers (AT)
M 200 C 12

MP 28 submachine gun

2
Type 99 machine gun

4
Type 100 submachine gun

Type 4 rocket launcher

Inventory:

20x

Inventory:

14x

10x

12x

4x

28x

H 4 X 2

4x

10

Japanese Imperial Army: Infantry squads
Kamikazes
M 1 C 15

Combat guide
Machine gunners of the Empire
M 2 C 24 H 10 X 2

H 5 X 2

During the war in the Pacific, soldiers of the
Imperial Army won the reputation for never

11

2

surrendering, substantiated by the small number

4
Type 99 rifle

of Japanese prisoners that were taken during the
campaign, compared to their opponents.

Inventory:

Many United States soldiers saw how, on facing

10x

4
MP 28 submachine gun

Type 99 machine gun

4x

defeat, the Imperial soldiers would shout "Tenno

Kamikazes
To serve in the Japanese
Army was seen as serving
the Emperor. The military
culture dictated that it
was a great honor to die
in his name, following
the Samurai concept of
servitude. On the other
hand, signs of cowardice
and disobedience were
a disgrace for the
individual, their family
and community. These
beliefs were profoundly
instilled in all Japanese
soldiers, who were trained
to face death before
dishonor.

Heika Banzai!" (Long live the emperor!) before charging into battle, demonstrating, with

Marine paratroopers
M 3 C 30 H 10 X 3

this triumphal shout, their willingness to die before being defeated.
Following the Samurai code of honor, these Japanese soldiers preferred "gyokusai"
(honorable death) before being defeated. Armed with submachine guns, these soldiers

The marine paratroopers were an elite corps that formed part of the Special Naval

did not hesitate to use the powerful explosives they carried in order to exchange their lives

Landing Forces (SNLF). Equipped with light armaments, the main objective of

for those of their enemies.

these units was to attack key points in coastal areas, supporting amphibious
assaults and landings or capturing airfields and other strategic enclaves.
Equipped with an armored halftrack and armed with rifles, light machine guns

5

and antipersonnel mines, these elite troops were especially well prepared for
capturing strategic enemy positions and then securing these areas, laying
Type 100 submachine gun

minefields and resisting enemy infantry counterattacks.

8

2
Type 99 rifle

Inventory:

Inventory:

5x

26x

22x

Type 99 machine gun

16x

2x

6x

40x

12

Japanese Imperial Army: Specialized soldiers

Combat guide

13

Specialized soldiers
Rifleman
M 11 C 2.5

Team with anti-tank rifle
M 60 C 6
H 2 X 3

H 1 X 2

1

2
Type 99 rifle

Type 100 submachine gun

Inventory:

1x

1
Type 97 AT rifle

Inventory:

1x

1x

2x

2x

Submachine gun
M 12 C 2.5 H 1 X 2

1

1x
Anti-tank team
M 70 C 6

2
Type 100 submachine gun

2x

1x
Machine gunner
M 40 C 3
H 1 X 2

1
Type 99 machine gun

1x

Type 4 rocket launcher

Inventory:

1x

Inventory:

1
Type 100 submachine gun

Inventory:

H 2 X 3

2x

2x

1x

11x

Anti-tank rifles
The most effective infantry response against the threat from light
armored vehicles. These were extraordinarily powerful rifles which
fired large caliber armor-piercing ammunition. With long range and
high accuracy, they were capable of destroying scout vehicles and light tanks from long distances.
They could also be used against enemy infantry: their projectiles were so heavy that they could go
through barricades and obstacles and hit the soldiers hidden behind them, as well as the gun crews,
machine guns and other fixed weapons.
The anti-tank rifles lost efficiency as soon as medium and heavy tanks appeared on the battlefield,
as the armor of these vehicles was too tough and could only be damaged with lucky shots against
the engine and other weak points of the hull. One anti-tank projectile fired point blank could go
through a 30 mm thick steel plate. However, their penetration capacity was considerably reduced the
further the weapon was from the target. At the best firing distance possible, they could penetrate
plates up to a maximum of 10 mm.

14

Japanese Imperial Army: Specialized soldiers

Crew
M 10

C 4

Combat guide

Officer
M 160 C 8

H 2 X 2

2

15

1

1

Type 14 Nambu pistol

Type 14 Nambu pistol

Inventory:

1x

Flamethrower team
M 75 C 5
H 2 X 2

1

1
Type 100 submachine gun

4x

Flamethrower

1x

Radio operator
M 4 C 11

3

Inventory:

H 3 X 2

1
Type 100 submachine gun

Flare pistol

Inventory:

1x

1x
Sniper
M 160 C 8

1
Type 99 sniper rifle
Inventory:

3x

Flare pistol

Inventory:

1x

2x

H 1 X 3

1x

1x

4x

H 1 X 4

2x

2x

1x

21x

16

Japanese Imperial Army: Fixed weapons and artillery

Combat guide

Fixed weapons and artillery
Heavy machine gun Machine gun
M 100 C 5
Main:

Type 1 47 mm AT AT gun
M 140 C 5






L 7.7 mm R Auto A 80 m

Main:

L 47 mm R 4

AP:

73

69

59



10

30

70

Inventory:

Inventory:

1030x

51x
Type 2 20 mm AA AA defense
M 200 C 2.5

Main:





29

27

21



10

30

70

Main:

18
100 m

Y





Y





Y

39
130 m

L 57 mm R 4.5 A 130 m
88

84

72



10

30

70

36
130 m

Inventory:

51x
Type 94 mortar Mortar
M 350 C 5
L 90 mm R 5

AP:

15

15

15



10

30

70

Inventory:

121x



5x

AP:

1x

Main:



A 130 m

Type 2 57 mm AT AT gun
M 220 C 5

Inventory:

900x

50x

Y

L 20 mm R Auto A 100 m

AP:

17

A 110 m
15
110 m





50x

5x

Type 90 75 mm AT AT gun
M 280 C 5


Main:

L 75 mm R 5.5 A 130 m

AP:

107

102

93



10

30

70

71
130 m

Inventory:

1x

51x

50x

5x

1x

18

Japanese Imperial Army: Fixed weapons and artillery
Type 4 75 mm AA AA defense / AT gun
M 500 C 10

Main:

L 75 mm R 6

AP:

146

138



10

30





124

Main:

84

19
200 mm rocket Rocket mortar
M 5 C 5

Y

A 150 m

70

Combat guide





Y

L 200 mm R 80 A 180 m

In 1943, the Japanese developed a 200
mm rocket mortar that fired self-propelled

150 m

projectiles stabilized with fins. This feature made it more accurate and gave it a greater
range of fire, making it superior to conventional mortars. The first units were deployed in

Inventory:

51x

the Battle of Iwo Jima and Okinawa. Powerful and economical, considerable numbers

50x

5x

of this rocket launcher were produced and stored as a precaution against a possible
amphibious invasion of their national territory.

Type 91 105 mm howitzer Field howitzer
M 600 C 10
Main:

The 200 mm rockets had a long range and high explosive power, outperforming the





Y

L 105 mm R 70 A 220 m

infantry's 90 mm mortars by far. However, the reload time was slow, and only one projectile
could be fired every one and a half minutes. The blast radius of these rockets was
very wide and they could wipe out an entire squad of soldiers if hit in open
country, as well as seriously damage or destroy armored vehicles close to
the impact point.

Inventory:

66x

Inventory:

1x

21x
Type 96 150 mm howitzer Field howitzer
M 800 C 10

Main:

L 150 mm R 75 A 250 m

Inventory:

36x

12x

1x





Y

1x

Mortars
All nations provided their infantry with some kind of portable
mortar. These weapons were fundamental in providing support
fire during attacks on fortified positions defended by infantry
units, protected by barricades or sandbags. Mortars were also
very efficient at bombarding weapons emplacements, as the
shrapnel from their projectiles could injure a gun crew without
damaging the weapon, allowing it to be recovered.
As they had a short range, it was important to deploy mortars
behind large obstacles such as rock formations, buildings
or unevenness of the ground. The parabola described by their
projectiles reached such a height that they could even be used
to fire above multi-storey buildings.

20

Japanese Imperial Army: Light vehicles

Combat guide

Light vehicles
Type 92 Scout vehicle
M 150 C 10
Armor:

1 15 2 15 3 15
4 20 5 20 6 20
G 4x Type 99

21
Ha-Go Light tank
M 160 C 11

Main:

V 38

D 5 S - Y

L 37 mm R 3

AP:

52

48

38



10

30

70

V 38

A 110 m
28
110 m

Armor:

1 12 2 12 3 6
4 12 5 12 6 12
G 2x Type 1

Its five occupants operated the four machine
guns that covered the front and both sides
of the vehicles, as well as the machine gun
mounted on the revolving upper turret.

Armed with a 37 mm gun, the Type 95 was

Ha-Go

also equipped with two machine guns: one

The first Type 95 HaGo was manufactured in
1933. Thanks to its
limited armor, this tank
matched the speed of
transport vehicles used
by the Imperial Infantry.
Thanks to the limited
number of tanks and antitank weapons shown by
the enemy army, the Type
95 proved effective in
its interventions in
the Manchuria and China
campaigns.

on the front part of the bodywork and one on
the rear part of the turret.

This deployment of armament made the Type
92 an excellent unit for harassing enemy

Approximately 2,000 units of this model were

infantry, as long as the latter did not have

manufactured that were used by the marines

support from armed vehicles.

of the Imperial Navy during the war in the

Type 92

Pacific. Nevertheless, and in spite

This armored
reconnaissance vehicle
was used by marine
infantry troops in
support of their land
operations.

of the success obtained during
confrontations against
infantry battalions, the HaGo showed that it could not
measure up to allied tanks
of the era. Its limited armor and
armament advised against its use
for infantry support in hostile territory.

Inventory:

5.120x

D 3 S 2

Inventory:

1x

69x

50x

5x

2.460x

1x

22

Japanese Imperial Army: Light vehicles
Ke-Nu Light tank
M 180 C 9
Main:

V 38

58

52

41



10

30

70

30
110 m

To do this, the Chi-Ha
medium tank turret was
mounted on the modified
chassis of the Ha-Go,
which allowed a larger
main gun to be added.

D 3 S 2

V 29

D 4 S 4

L 57 mm R 4.5 A 110 m

AP:

58

52

41



10

30

70

30
110 m

Armor:

Armor:

1 12 2 12 3 6
4 25 5 25 6 12

1 25 2 15 3 7
4 25 5 25 6 12

G 2x Type 1

G 2x Type 1
The Chi-Ha performed well as a support tank.

Ke-Nu
Vehicle designed to
resolve the problems
presented by the narrow
turret of the original HaGo.

23
Chi-Ha 57 Light tank
M 200 C 13

Main:

L 57 mm R 4.5 A 110 m

AP:

Combat guide

It had slightly superior armor to that of the
Ha-Go, especially at the front, and had better

The 57 mm gun fired explosive projectiles
with greater firepower, which made it more
efficient than the Ha-Go when fighting
against enemy infantry.

armament. In spite of these advantages, the

Chi-Ha 57

front armor was vulnerable to lighter anti-tank guns, such as the American M3 or the Soviet

This improved version of
the Ha-Go was developed
in 1936. The Type 97
included a turret for two
crew and the armor and
armament was considerably
increased with respect to
its predecessor. It was
one of the most used tanks
of the war, with 1,162
units manufactured during
the first years of the
conflict.

M-37, and its low speed did not permit it to flank enemy tanks without receiving return fire.

100 units of the Ke-Nu
were manufactured.

Inventory:

51x

Inventory:

50x

5x

2.460x

1x

71x

36x

5x

2.410x

1x

24

Japanese Imperial Army: Light vehicles
Chi-Ha 47 Light tank
M 240 C 15

Main:

L 47 mm R 4

AP:

73

69

59



10

30

70

V 30

Combat guide
Isuzu AA AA vehicle
M 250 C 12.5

D 5 S 4
Main:

A 130 m
39
130 m

25

D 4 S - Y

V 18

D 4 S 4

L 20 mm R Auto A 100 m

AP:

29

27

21



10

30

70

18
100 m

Armor:

An Isuzu lorry that transported a 20 mm,

1 25 2 20 3 20
4 25 5 25 6 25

automatic anti-aircraft gun was useful for

G 1x Type 99

V 30

giving fire support to the allied infantry during
their assaults, and for defending an area with
possible incursions of light vehicles. It had two disadvantages: the chassis offered little

G 2x Type 1

protection against explosive ammunition and the driver's cab prevented the gun from

After confronting Soviet tanks, superior in range

turning through 360 degrees or from aiming to the front.

and power, the Imperial Army proposed to

Inventory:

develop better armed medium tanks. In 1941, the
design was completed for a new 47 mm high velocity gun named Type 1. This new

630x

weapon managed to increase the rate of fire with regard to the previous 57 mm
gun, which gave it greater armor penetration capacity and better range of fire.

SS-D Minesweeper
M 250 C 8

The same tank chassis underwent modifications to be adapted to the new gun:
owing to its great size, the original turret was replaced with that of a Chi-He
medium tank. Finally, 930 units of the Chi-Ha were produced between 1942 and

Armor:

1943.

1 25 2 15 3 15

Thanks to the 47 mm gun, the Chi-Ha could successfully confront light tanks such as
the Stuart. However, its limited armor (caused partly by the lack of steel, used mainly

G 2x Type 99

for the construction of warships), made it inefficient against heavier tanks like the

Constructed on the chassis of a medium tank,

United States Sherman.

the SS-D was a sapper vehicle capable of digging up mines in its path. Armed with two
machine guns and five flamethrowers that pointed towards the corners and front, this
vehicle gave a new meaning to the concept of "firepower". Unfortunately, its armor was
not enough for it to cross enemy infantry lines and deploy its weapons efficiently.

Inventory:

75x

Inventory:

45x

5x

2.440x

1x

1.710x

1x

1x

26

Japanese Imperial Army: Tank destroyer

Combat guide

27

Tank destroyer
Ho-Ri 2 Heavy tank destroyer
M 1900 C 48

Ho-Ni 1 Light tank destroyer
M 350 C 21
Main:

Ho-Ni 1
The Ho-Ni 1 was the
Japanese response to
modern United States tanks
deployed in the Pacific
war, against which the
main Imperial battle tank,
the Chi-Ha, could not
compete in armament. 124
units of the model Type 1
Ho-Ni 1 were manufactured,
based on the Chi-Ha
chassis and equipped with
a high velocity 75 mm gun
mounted on the open-top
armored roof.

V 26

D 3 S 6

L 75 mm R 5.5 A 130 m

AP:

107

102

93



10

30

70

71

Main:

D 4 S 4

L 105 mm R 12 A 150 m

AP:

223



10

Secondary:

130 m

V 20

208
30

177

116

70

L 37 mm R 3

Armor:

AP:

52

48

38

1 25 2 25 3 7
4 10 5 10 6 10



10

30

70

150 m

A 110 m
28
110 m

Armor:

1 180 2 75 3 60

The front armor was not sufficient to

G 1x Type 1

withstand the impact from any anti-tank
weapon and the weapon's armor-plated

The Ho-Ri was a conceptual design of an

covers did not protect heavy machine guns,

experimental Type 5 Chi-Ri heavy tank. There were no prototypes or documents which

therefore the vehicle was very vulnerable to

indicated that its production was being planned, but it had to be armed with a powerful

enemy fire.

105 mm high velocity gun, as well as a secondary 37 mm gun belonging to the original

However, the main weapon could be used successfully against any enemy medium

design.

tank, such as the United States Sherman (with the

Clearly inspired by the large German Jagdtiger and Elefant tank destroyers, the front armor

exception of the Jumbo series), the Soviet T-34s

of the Ho-Ri was reinforced to 180 mm, which gave it superior protection against any allied

or the British Cromwell and Comet.

tank destroyer, while the 105 mm gun, although slower and with a lower range than the one
designed for the Chi-Ri, had a far superior capacity for penetration and causing damage.
There were two variants of the original design, the Ho-Ri 1 and the Ho-Ri 2, differing from
each other mainly in the layout of their armament and engine. The Ho-Ri 2 was similar to the Chi-Ri, with the armament located at the
front part and the engine in the rear part of the hull.
The front machine gun and 37 mm gun provided a good defense against light vehicles and infantry. As it shared the hull design of the
Chi-Ri, the lack of inclination of the front part of the plate, where the secondary 37 mm gun was mounted, was a weak point. As it did
not have a turret, all its combat effectiveness was lost if it became immobilized, so that trying to get cover in the flanks and tracks was
vital for the Ho-Ri's survival.

Inventory:

46x

Inventory:

25x

5x

1x

26x

27x

5x

31x

30x

5x

3.530x

1x

28

Japanese Imperial Army: Tank destroyer

223

208



10

30

Secondary:
AP:


V 20

D 4 S 4

Ho-Ni 2 Self-propelled howitzer
M 750 C 11

L 105 mm R 12 A 150 m

AP:

177

116

70

L 37 mm R 3

52

48

38

10

30

70

29

Artillería autopropulsada

Ho-Ri 1 Heavy tank destroyer
M 10 C 48
Main:

Combat guide

Main:

150 m

L 105 mm R 70 A 220 m

Armor:

A 110 m

1 25 2 25 3 7
4 10 5 10 6 10

28
110 m

Armor:

1 150 2 100 3 60

As with the light Ho-Ni 1 tank destroyers,

G 1x Type 1

to infantry units. With the aim of improving

the Ho-Ni 2 was designed to give support
these performances, a 105 mm howitzer was

The Ho-Ri 1 was a variation of the Chi-Ri

added that fired explosive projectiles and

heavy tank. In contrast to the modified Ho-Ri

provided a perfect complement to the Ho-Ni

2 model, the armament was mounted on the

1. In spite of its notable efficiency in combat,

rear part of the vehicle, while the engine was

only 54 units were manufactured.

in the mid point (a similar distribution to that of
the German Elefant).

The vehicle was rapid and reliable; the weapon had good accuracy in spite of the large
distance it could fire, comparable to other similar caliber field artillery. However, its limited

It kept the main 105 mm weapon and the secondary 37 mm weapon, as well

armor did not protect it from enemy artillery fire nor from small caliber anti-tank weapons.

as the auxiliary machine gun mounted on the hull. The side protection of the
vehicle was reinforced: whereas, after keeping the same weight and speed,
the front armor was less thick. In other aspects, this model was practically
identical to the Ho-Ri 2.

Inventory:

26x

Inventory:

27x

5x

31x

30x

5x

3.530x

1x

36x

1x

V 26

D 3 S 6

30

Japanese Imperial Army: Artillería autopropulsada
Ho-Ro Self-propelled howitzer
M 1000 C 11
Main:

V 30

L 150 mm R 75 A 250 m

Main:
Armor:

1 25 2 25 3 7
4 10 5 10 6 10

1 15 2 8 3 8

by the Imperial Army in the Battle of the
Philippines. The remaining units were sent to

due to its tonnage and average weight, but it was
capable of firing 170 kg projectiles to considerable distances.

reloading, like the German Sturmtiger. Its reload time was extremely long, double that

in number by the United Sates artillery.

of the majority of artillery batteries, but the destructive capacity of the 300 mm projectile
was devastating, and could even destroy the heaviest tanks. Due to its limited speed and
armor, it was very vulnerable to return fire from enemy artillery.

Inventory:

close quarters combat. However, operating from the rearguard lines, the Ho-Ro could
efficiently bombard defensive and

10x

entrenched positions.

1x

Isuzu mortar Self-propelled mortar
M 1 C 7.5
Main:

L 90 mm R 5

AP:

15

15

15



10

30

70

A 110 m
15
110 m

The Japanese army used the Isuzu gun as a base for different armed vehicles, among which
was this mortar transport. Provided with an armament equivalent to that used by the infantry
troops, the lorry provided the mortar with great mobility. However, on increasing its profile,
camouflaging the weapon became difficult, increasing its vulnerability when firing.

36x

Inventory:

12x

1x

D 3 S - Y

mortar could not be raised more than 50 degrees

Contrary to other artillery vehicles, the Ha-To fired one single massive projectile before

Inventory:

V 30

as a mobile armament platform. Its heavy 300 mm

Battle of Okinawa, where they were exceeded

caliber and the open cab that housed the crew did not provide sufficient protection in

D 5 S -

Designed in 1943, the Ha-To was manufactured

the islands to defend national territory in the

The armor, inherited from the Chi-Ha, was not sufficient to resist attack from guns of any

V 20

L 300 mm R 150 A 180 m

Armor:

vehicles, and this was how it was deployed

The designers of the HoRo were inspired by the
German self-propelled
artillery for mounting
a 150 mm howitzer on
the Chi-Ha medium tank
chassis. Nevertheless,
due to difficulties when
producing units on a large
scale, only 25 vehicles
were manufactured.

31
Ha-To Self-propelled howitzer
M 1300 C 27.5

D 3 S 6

The Ho-Ro generally operated in units of four

Ho-Ro

Combat guide

121x

32

Japanese Imperial Army: Tanks

Combat guide

Tanks

Ho-I Medium tank
M 360 C 23

Chi-He Medium tank
M 300 C 23
Main:
AP:

88

L 57 mm R 4.5 A 130 m
84
72
36



10

30

70

V 34

D 4 S 4

Main:

L 75 mm R 130 A 130 m

Armor:

1 50 2 30 3 20
4 60 5 30 6 30

130 m

Armor:

G 1x Type 1

1 50 2 30 3 8
4 50 5 45 6 12
G 1x Type 99

33

Modification of the Chi-He tank designed
to attack anti-tank defensive positions and
fortifications against which the high velocity

G 1x Type 1

57 mm guns were ineffective.

The medium Chi-He tank was designed

On the Chi-He chassis, the Ho-I mounted a

before Japan entered the Second World War,

large turret armed with a 75 mm low velocity

but its mass production did not begin until
1943 because, until then, quality steel was used first and foremost for the construction of
warships.
At the end of 1944, the number of units manufactured reached 170, which were sent
to different parts of Japanese territory as defense against a possible allied invasion,
which never happened. In fact, this armored tank never went into combat. In any case,
the Japanese Army's objective was to have a tank capable of confronting the new
generation of United States tanks. Compared with the previous models, the Type 1 ChiHe had heavier armor, a more powerful engine and a high velocity 57 mm gun with high

howitzer, which provided extraordinary
firepower by firing explosive projectiles in parabolic trajectories.
Like other self-propelled howitzers, the Ho-I could take advantage of unevenness in the
ground and low obstacles in order to bombard static defenses without exposing itself
to enemy fire. Its armor was slightly reinforced on the weakest plates: on those which
protected the rear part and the upper covers. However, the size of the 75 mm howitzer
forced the removal of the rear machine gun that was characteristic of the Chi-Ha and
Chi-He models.

penetration capacity.
Slightly longer and higher than the Chi-Ha, its profile was very low compared with United States and British tanks (except the
Crusader). This was a rapid tank, with an acceptable armor for the initial stages of combat and a main gun which could destroy light
vehicles and medium tanks.
It only had two machine guns, one of which was mounted on the rear part of the turret, which restricted its defense capability against
enemy infantry. For this reason it is recommended to keep the tank away from the front line of battle.

Inventory:

71x

Inventory:

34x

5x

4.090x

1x

50x

1.280x

1x

V 34

D 4 S 4

34

Japanese Imperial Army: Tanks
Chi-Nu Medium tank
M 400 C 23
Main:

Chi-Nu
Although the Chi-He was
designed to confront
the United States M4
Sherman, the Imperial
Army needed a better tank
that could exceed the
firepower of its rivals
on the battlefield. At
the start of 1943, the
Type 4 Chi-To was already
being developed, but
delays in the programme
forced the creation of
an intermediate tank with
existing components.
And so it was that the
Type 3 Chi-Nu was born,
the design of which
commenced in May 1943
and was finalized six
months later. However,
its production was not
considered a priority and
it was delayed until 1944.

V 34

107

102

93



10

30

70

Main:

71
130 m

35
Chi-To Medium tank
M 950 C 40

D 4 S 4

L 75 mm R 5.5 A 130 m

AP:

Combat guide

L 75 mm R 6

AP:

146

138



10

30

V 32

D 5 S 4

A 150 m

124

84

70

150 m

Armor:

Armor:

1 50 2 30 3 20
4 50 5 30 6 30

1 75 2 50 3 35
4 75 5 50 6 50

G 1x Type 1

G 1x Type 99

The Chi-Nu was the last tank supplied by

In 1944, the design of the Type 4 Chi-To was

the Imperial Army until the end of the war.

completed, in which technicians and German

Between 1944 and 1945, 166 units were

war veterans participated in order to try to equal the performance of the modern German

manufactured that were assigned to the

tanks. That same year, the first prototype was built, with its mass production predicted

defense of national territory.

for 1945, but the abrupt end of the war paralyzed the project with just two tanks

G 1x Type 1

manufactured and another four hulls built.

Based on the chassis of the Chi-He, it had a new
hexagonal turret, larger and with the armor better

Although the hull of the Chi-To, with its slightly inclined armored plates, had the same

distributed, which housed a large 75 mm

profile as its predecessors, the thickness was increased up to 75 mm on the front. The

anti-tank gun, one of the largest

hexagonal turret, larger, higher and with reinforced armor, housed a large high velocity

weapons fitted to a Japanese

75 mm anti-aircraft gun with a range and penetration capacity far superior to weapons

tank during the Second World

mounted in previous tanks. Following the German school of thought, a machine gun was

War.

mounted on the commander's cupola, increasing the vehicle's defense against infantry
attacks.

In terms of the performance, the Chi-Nu was
identical to the Chi-He, except for the gun,

The Chi-To was an excellent medium tank, far superior in firepower and armor than the Soviet T-34 or the more advanced version of the

which provided greater penetration capacity and

United States Sherman, equipped with 85 mm and 76 mm anti-tank weapons. Its main weapon provided similar performance to the

fired a more powerful explosive projectile, although the effective range of the weapon was

Soviet IS-1 or the United States M26 Pershing and, although it was not capable of penetrating the front armor of the British Churchill,

the same. The large size of the projectiles reduced the quantity of ammunition that the tank

its increased mobility gave it advantages in combat. As in nearly all Japanese tanks, the armor of the Chi-To was not prepared to

could carry. Furthermore, the Chi-Nu saw the final disappearance of the rear machine gun

withstand much punishment, not even head-on, which made it advisable to use it to fire surprise shots and retreat undercover without

from Japanese tank designs.

giving away its position and avoiding the enemy counterattack.

Inventory:

53x

Inventory:

37x

5x

1.280x

1x

46x

32x

5x

1.410x

1x

36

Japanese Imperial Army: Tanks

AP:

181

L 88 mm R 8
173
158



10

30

Secondary:

70

L 37 mm R 3

AP:

52

48

38



10

30

70

V 30

A 160 m
97
160 m

A 110 m
28
110 m

Armor:

Chi-Ri
The Chi-Ri was one of
the last tank models
developed by Japan
during the Second
World War. However,
the scarcity of raw
materials and the
deterioration that
the allied bombings
had caused to
Japanese industrial
infrastructures grounded
the project. The only
incomplete prototype
built was captured by
United States troops
after the Japanese
surrender.

1 100 2 75 3 50
4 100 5 75 6 50
G 2x Type 99

37

Designed as a larger and better armored

Chi-Ri Heavy tank
M 1500 C 50
Main:

Combat guide

D 5 S 4

The upper part of
the turret housed a
machine gun operated
by the commander. An
additional machine gun
occupied the left flank
of the turret for defense
against enemy infantry.

version of the Chi-To, it had a 550 HP
Kawasaki engine that had to give it
acceptable mobility in spite of its 100 mm
thick armor on its front part.
What is certain is that if the Chi-Ri had
entered combat it would have more than
overcome the United States Shermans and
Soviet T-34s. Although its main gun did not
have as much range as the heavier antitank weapons mounted on the Tiger II and
the IS-3, its secondary gun was excellent
for attacking light vehicles or infantry

G 1x Type 1

defensive positions and anti-tank guns.
The front armor, equivalent to that of
the majority of heavy tanks from other
nations, had sufficient side protection to
resist impacts from medium caliber guns.
However, the plate with no inclination,
over which the secondary 37 mm gun was
mounted, was a weak point which could be
exploited by any weapon with the capacity
to penetrate 100 mm of steel. In fact, a
projectile that penetrated this area would
probably cause a huge explosion in the

According to design documents,
the Chi-Ri was going to be armed
with an 88 mm anti-aircraft gun,
which provided it with superior
firepower to any United States
tank and equivalent to the heavy
Soviet IS-2s and IS-3s, although
with less effective range.

inside of the tank.

The tank armament was completed
with a machine gun installed on
the front of the hull, along with a
secondary 37 mm gun prepared
for firing explosive and penetrating
projectiles.

Inventory:

51x

27x

5x

31x

30x

5x

1.740x

1x

38

Japanese Imperial Army: Tanks
Chi-Ha 120 Light tank
M 6 C 50

Main:

L 120 mm R 25

V 27

D 5 S 4

Combat guide

Transport and logistics

A 180

Armor:

1 25 2 20 3 20
4 25 5 25 6 25
G 1x Type 99

39

Type 97 Motorcycle
M 60 C 5

V 45

D 2 S 1

Ho-Ha Armored half track
M 125 C 10

V 35

D 4 S 6 Y

G 1x Type 99

G 1x Type 1

In the final months of the Second World War,
the Imperial Japanese Navy carried out
experimental modifications to the Chi-Ha tanks,
fitting them with a short, 120 mm naval gun. A
reduced number of tanks were transferred and
assigned to the special landing forces, although
their mass production was not even considered.

Inventory:

630x

Despite being a tank with reduced dimensions and lightly armored, the modified Chi-Ha
had considerable firepower. Its 120 mm gun could fire explosive howitzer shells to large
distances, competing with enemy artillery. Although it was incapable of penetrating
armor, the parabolic trajectory and extraordinary accuracy of its shots meant that it could
punish fixed enemy anti-tank defenses.
The armor of these vehicles barely protected the low caliber weapons and anti-tank rifles,
therefore they always had to operate far from enemy lines.

Armor:

1 15 2 15 3 15
G 1x Type 99
This half track was developed in 1941 and was
used by the naval forces to transport troops
and tow artillery guns. It stands out from similar
vehicles used by other nations thanks to the three machine guns with which it was armed, one on
the front and another on each side, which gave the Ho-Ha superior firepower.

On requesting this unit during the battle, two Chi-Ha 120 tanks are deployed.

Inventory:

25x

Inventory:

2.410x

1x

5.090x

24x

12x

12x

12x

1x

40

Japanese Imperial Army: Transport and logistics
Isuzu (transport) Supply truck
M 50 C 5

V 36

D 2 S 10 Y

Combat guide

41

Special attacks
¡Banzai!
M 4 C 72

Transported ammunition and supplies
for the infantry troops.

a

Deploys assault troops embarked in light tanks and takes advantage of the combination of firepower and mobility in order to rapidly get
close to the enemy and attack its weak points.

Inventory:

5.000x

During the Historic Battles, this option orders the attack on several Ha-Go light tanks supported by infantry. These forces will attack the

2.000x

500x

10x

20x

10x

10x

15x

1x

enemy independently, clearing the way for your troops.
In other game modes, two squads of paratroopers will be deployed and two Chi-Ha 47 tanks as support against infantry and enemy
vehicles. The paratroopers carry antipersonnel mines to secure the terrain conquered by the tanks.

Isuzu (supplies) Supply truck
M 150 C 5

V 36

D 2 S - Y

Transported supplies for the infantry, as well
as ammunition for all types of gun and large
weapons used by the Imperial Army. It also
carried additional Jerry cans of fuel.

Inventory:

5.000x

2.000x

500x

10x

20x

10x

100x

Ammunition for all types of weapon and gun used by the Japanese Army.
Isuzu (engineers) Supply truck
M 250 C 5

elements, as well as mines and spare fuel.

Inventory:

24x

24x

30x

20x

30x

2x

V 34

Transported supplies for the installation of defensive

14x

10x

2x

5x

D 2 S - Y


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